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  • #16
    Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
    When you go asking your senators for things, you need a rock solid base. When someone notes that "David Marchetti" is after this bill, and Google's him... They're going to find rants about how the police are evil and corrupt and anything else that he's posted.

    Corbier I can tell by your statement your a law enforcement lackey, not all police officers are angels by any means, at least I speak the cold hard truth. Come deal with some of the security hating police officers we have had contact with over the years I know not all of them are bad, but many are and that's a fact - suck it up and move along as it's getting old. I judge the cop based individually I know a lot of good cops too, ones I would trust with my life. It's the bad dishonest ones I do not like or support. Have a problem with it, tough as I really don't care. And yes, after 22 years of being in this profession and owning my own agency for 14 yes I would like to see some viable changes in the laws. Go get hit by a tractor trailer durring a burglary, have a former suspect stalk you, and bring a federal lawsuit against a city and police department then talk your nonsense. Sorry some of us are realists in life and in my eyes you don't even come close to my experience in the field, your not all that nor a bag of chips buddy.

    Here in Texas private security is taken seriously (for example, SOs are included in our "Assault of a Public Servant" statutue), if you want that to happen in your state, you HAVE to avoid giving the wrong impression. This "commentary" gives the wrong impression.

    Black Caesar our state statutes governing security have been lacking for a very very long time, just a few years ago we could not even carry a nightstick while on duty without a special permit, no state statute exists that permits us to carry mace, but their is no state statute that prohibits it so it leaves many companies and S/O's in the lurch so to speak. Do I issue my employees mace or don't I?.They have not even addressed Air Tasors being carried by Security Officers but they are addressing it for Police Officers, again we are left out in the lurch so to speak. The only law governing the use of electronic stun gun makes it a Felony to use such a devise with no statutory exemptions for Police or Security. But Police are using them are they technically violating statutory law when they use them?. I think that's a valid question don't you?. Local Police Department regulations are not LAW. No law prohibts a Security Officer from carrying one, but it's a Felony if used?, then why carry it if you can't use it legally?.

    Let's just say a lot of gaps are left wide open in state laws. Now they are they really getting some bad advise somewhere or their brains are in park. As for Assault of a Public Servant or Safety Officer they cover PRIVATE employees of hospitals and Ambulance Companies, we should have been included years ago, but we have not to date. It makes no sense you assault a emergency room nurse it's a Felony, you assault the Security Officer that act's to protect her it's a Misdemeanor?. And they want to make it a Felony to hit a kids coach?. Please explain the logic of this to me?. This is what irks the hell out of me it's like they put very little thought into the legislation.
    David - I think I see now where your problems are coming from.
    Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
    Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

    Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by HotelSecurity
      Are In-House people governed by the same laws in Conn. We bought a hotel in Hartford about 2 years ago.
      Not exactly. I don't believe that they are required to be licensed as is contract security. Furthermore, the square badge requirement is not applicable. I am unsure about the need for criminal background checks, but that part may very well apply. If not, common sense would dictate that such a check be performed.
      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

      Comment


      • #18
        David

        As a fellow CT security officer, I believe that you have the potential to influence legislatures to view contract security in a more favorable light. I understand your frustration with SOME LEO's. I had a few bad experiences myself.

        Still, we can't get prominent people to help us unless we befriend them. Sometimes that means interacting with individuals who may be somewhat hostile towards security. Diplomacy and professionalism are musts if we are to win them over. Since you have your own security company, I urge you to take positive steps towards gaining the trust and respect of the law makers and law enforcement people so that they will give you a favorable hearing regarding the difficulties that you encounter in the security field.

        You can help us, but you need to "attract bees with honey," if you know what I mean.
        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

        Comment


        • #19
          David, Nathan may be many things but to refer to him as a lackey or toady crosses the line of propriety. Few of us in this forum outwardly try to be offensive, perhaps capriciously. From the use of bold capitalization, shouting, it would appear you have made it your mission to do so. To that end, please modify your tone or kindly go elsewhere.
          Bill Warnock

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Bill Warnock
            To that end, please modify your tone or kindly go elsewhere.
            Bill Warnock
            Amen!
            "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

            "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

            "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

            "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

            Comment


            • #21
              David, you've got to be kidding, I mean you really do. I don't know what it was that caused you to have this mighty "i'm a poor victim/waaaaahhhh the cops don't like me" chip on your shoulder, but the resolution to any problem starts with self-examination.

              If how you wrote you're "commentary" is indicitive of how you conduct affairs, then no wonder you and the people who work for you have problems with police. You can't condem people (like the Police) for a holier than thou/can do no wrong attitude when you display the same attitude when someone challenges your (poorly written, combative, confused, "tackelberryish") commentary.

              In 12 years (and some change) in private security/protection and public saftey, i've had a handful of bad contacts with other policemen. I know thats not the same for everyone, but in my honest opinion, the majority of people I've known on the private side that had problems with police on the level you suggest were people who continually overstep the bounds of their limited authority (and they always think they should be given more authority from the state....).

              LEOs are far from perfect, but (like I'd tell any criminal as well), you can spend you're whole life blaming the police for your problems, or you can stop doing the dumb things that attract police attention in the 1st place......
              ~Black Caesar~
              Corbier's Commandos

              " "The trouble with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
                Rolls his eyes another intelligent moderator heard from. My problems? another half brained individual heard from, my problem as you put it was not only my problem but a problem for all of my employees being harassed, threatened, stalked, unlawfully stopped, threatened with arrests, and a lot of other nonsense by some locals, I have not even discussed details here, so do everyone a favor if you don't know even what your talking about check your attitude and keep your mouth closed, thank you. And the harassment was not limited to our security agency. What are you folks freaking retards, you desire to be subservient to the police and ignorant to the effect " Police can do no wrong in our society " wake up all ready and smell the damn coffee.

                http://www.policeabuse.org/

                http://www.aclu.org/police/gen/14614pub19971201.html

                http://flyservers.registerfly.com/me...ice_abuse.html

                http://www.gainesnet.com/police.htm

                http://www.payles.com/fightbak.html


                A quote from the FBI's site on Police Corruption

                "Police corruption knows no state or regional borders.
                It must be attacked not only by everyone in the law enforcement
                profession but also by elected officials from the governor's
                office to the state legislature to the mayor's office to the
                city council," Freeh said. "Ultimately, it is the
                public that must demand from their elected officials and law
                enforcement executives an absolute commitment to integrity."




                No inhouse is not required to be licensed, however some in the state seem to disagree as then legally speaking unlicensed security people don't mee the definition of being " Security Officers ". Look at P.A. 04-192 definition of what a Security Offficer is under law.
                Actually, I had a brain scan last year and have the pictures that prove I have both halves of my brain. Again you write about what has allegedly been done to you and your employees. I think I hit the nail on the head.

                I've worked both sides - law enforcement (federal-state-local) and I even owned a contract security agency. I made a lot of money on the contract security side - I can't be to much of a "freaking retard."
                Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

                Comment


                • #23
                  I wonder how the state representatives who have the same feelings some of these members do are going to feel when they do a little internet research on your topic, come across this board and find you are calling people half-brained and not all that and a bag of chips. I'm sure they will be very supportive of your letter.

                  As far as everything goes, I think your heart is in the right place, Lord knows I have begun to put stuff together to try to increase the power/authority vested in certain security officers here, but reading the original article, I do agree with some people, it would have been wise to let some people read and critique it before sending it out.

                  I can only wish you the best of luck in your endevaors however.
                  "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                  "The Curve" 1998

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Security Lights - Conn.

                    While it is true that yellow is the only flashing light permitted for security on public property, you can probably use white hide-away strobes in your vehicles parking lights. Numerous utility companies do this and they are bound by the same statute as security. If you have a good relationship with the PD, then I doubt if they will give you flak over it as long as it's not abused. Cops have bigger fish to fry.
                    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Mr. Security
                      While it is true that yellow is the only flashing light permitted for security on public property, you can probably use white hide-away strobes in your vehicles parking lights. Numerous utility companies do this and they are bound by the same statute as security. If you have a good relationship with the PD, then I doubt if they will give you flak over it as long as it's not abused. Cops have bigger fish to fry.
                      I don't think he has good relations with his police department.

                      Mr. Security, do you feel that you have more power than a private citizen? You're in CT, is any of what he's been saying resonating with you?

                      Its sad that I can point out flaws in his logic, and all he can do is mount ad hominem attacks against me, and anyone else who dares question that he is not "better" than a private citizen.
                      Some Kind of Commando Leader

                      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        This is part of an article written by David A Smith a couple of years ago. It is reference training and licenses for security officers in Ct.

                        "Participants should come out of this class with a solid understanding of what they can and cannot do under the law -- and most of it covers thing they cannot do," he said. "There are no special laws for security officers. Their job is to observe and report. In most instances, they're not allowed to even stop an individual, let alone frisk them or put them in handcuffs."

                        This is the full article.

                        http://www.jrrobertssecurity.com/sec...e-news0036.htm

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                          I don't think he has good relations with his police department.

                          Mr. Security, do you feel that you have more power than a private citizen? You're in CT, is any of what he's been saying resonating with you?
                          Its sad that I can point out flaws in his logic, and all he can do is mount ad hominem attacks against me, and anyone else who dares question that he is not "better" than a private citizen.
                          Absolutely not. I’m also afraid that his relationship with LE is strained. His best bet is to work with the police officers that he does respect and try to gain credibility with those who are in a position to change the restrictions that are affecting his company. Diplomacy is essential for any success. For some, this is difficult and it may be wise to hire a PR person to work with the powers that be. Name calling and angry remarks just make matters worse.
                          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by T202
                            This is part of an article written by David A Smith a couple of years ago. It is reference training and licenses for security officers in Ct.

                            "Participants should come out of this class with a solid understanding of what they can and cannot do under the law -- and most of it covers thing they cannot do," he said. "There are no special laws for security officers. Their job is to observe and report. In most instances, they're not allowed to even stop an individual, let alone frisk them or put them in handcuffs."

                            This is the full article.

                            http://www.jrrobertssecurity.com/sec...e-news0036.htm
                            The article is interesting, but not entirely accurate. For example, security can handcuff individuals. This is commonly done in LP and at malls when observing an offender committing a felony. In addition, 8 hours is hardly sufficient for a "solid understanding" of applicable laws. The test is very basic. If it were more difficult, many security guards would have a difficult time passing it. Security companies know that and you can bet that they fought hard to keep it simple. Otherwise, they would have to pay some of us what we are really worth.
                            Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Mr. Security
                              Absolutely not. I’m also afraid that his relationship with LE is strained. His best bet is to work with the police officers that he does respect and try to gain credibility with those who are in a position to change the restrictions that are affecting his company. Diplomacy is essential for any success. For some, this is difficult and it may be wise to hire a PR person to work with the powers that be. Name calling and angry remarks just make matters worse.
                              Mr. Marchetti has already been in the media, it seems. His plans to have our name, identification number, and photo ID applied to every bit of mail under federal law from 2002 got him a newspaper story.

                              Article about Marchetti and ID Postage

                              I'm not sure a PR person could help, a spokesman, maybe. After all, this is what people remember in his region when they see "Force-1 Security," the guy who wanted to do away with post boxes and make you go to the fire department to send mail, which will bear your Name, DL, and photo ID.
                              Some Kind of Commando Leader

                              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Say what??

                                The postage system is functioning at capacity as it is. I get my mail later than ever. We have seen the cost for postage increase considerably over the last ten years. The principle behind tracking mail is sound, but this method is not feasible. Furthermore, I don't want my DL information with my DOB and address floating around for identity thieves. Some states use the SS number for a DL. GA did; not sure if that's current.

                                Terrorist planners could easily defeat such a system by obtaining false ID or having low ranking members who are willing to sacrifice everything (9/11) do the mailing for them.
                                Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                                Comment

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