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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by wilrobnson
    I believe it...The last arrest I made as an officer in Alaska degenerated into a brawl when another (younger) officer's manhood was insulted. Apparently, I was kicked in the head. I didn't realize it until after we had the guy seated in the back, and I became dizzy. Dash cam confirmed it, but I have no memory of it.
    Best part was the cute deputy who investigated the traffic accident. After awhile, I stopped keeping track of report numbers, found the scene lieutenant, and he gave me all five report numbers and the info. Out of the five reports, I was listed as a primary witness in 4. Only one that didn't list me was the robbery investigation, since I was in the car wash.

    Oh, and the part where the kid started screaming in the back seat, the deputy's resting on our car, and he's like, "Find out what that idiot wants..." Go up, open the front door, and ask him, "What?" "I wanna call my mommy. My neck hurts."

    "How old are you," I ask. "Twenty," he says. "You can call your mommy at intake. Now, do you want medical treatment?" He of course says yes. So, we have to call an ambulance out.

    Deputy had some choice words about a twenty year old wanting to call mommy after being arrested in a stolen car, wrecking it, attacking a deputy, fighting...

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  • OccamsRazor
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    (The deputy forgot he was struck, honestly),
    I believe it...The last arrest I made as an officer in Alaska degenerated into a brawl when another (younger) officer's manhood was insulted. Apparently, I was kicked in the head. I didn't realize it until after we had the guy seated in the back, and I became dizzy. Dash cam confirmed it, but I have no memory of it.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Heh. I had no problem backing cops up, and would throw on the light bar (Warning of a hazard). But, the primary thing was: They knew who I was, and I knew who they were, and they LIKED the additional help. Of course, in Florida, a security vehicle may run its warning lights at any time to warn of a hazard on the road.

    The only time someone should pull in behind to assist is when its obvious that the LEO is losing the fight. At that time, if you can do it safely (that's a big if there), then you can play calvary.

    I do remember one time, my partner and I were driving home from work, and the gas station we were getting a car wash at (Car better have a wash before its parked at the office in the morning...) was robbed at knife point. Guy spun out, which raised our attention. The cashier ran to us, then we noticed a deputy pulling in for coffee, and off we went. We didn't go all balls to the wall, just followed the deputy - he knew he was being followed, didn't care. It was "on" when the deputy started his traffic stop in the middle of lane 3 on a 4 lane road, and the guy HIT the deputy with his vehicle to escape. Deputy jumped in, was in pursuit (forgot to radio), and off we went. Didn't have to violate any speed laws, use our lights, anything. Found the suspect vehicle ditched IN a ditch (tore up 40 feet of fence line), the deputy's vehicle with its door open pulled to the side.

    While my partner was more concerned with us "not appearing to interfere," I had other thoughts. We were already a target. The door to the cruiser was open. There was a wreck, and no deputy, no suspect. So, I advanced, cleared the cruiser, locked and shut the door. Moved to the next point - the suspect's car, made sure it wasn't on fire, and entered the tractor trailer farm after I heard struggling. Lo and behold, the guy was winning, till I drew my ASP and extended it while running at them both. The deputy took that moment to clock the guy HARD, and he went down. And we took the guy back to the car, stuffed him in, and then tried to figure out where the hell we all were - the deputy hadn't put anything out on the air other than "suspect vehicle crashed, foot pursuit."

    I was rather happy with myself in that I executed the tasks assigned to me (cuff, search, stuff) in such a way that I recovered a crack pipe, verified he wasn't armed, verified he didn't have a hidden handcuff key, and that he didn't have any needles or any other crap, that the deputy felt no need to re-search the guy, or check his cuffs, etc.

    For 10 minutes of fun, there was 6 hours of paperwork and interviews from three different agencies, since we were the only witnesses to a traffic crash, agg. battery on a LEO (The deputy forgot he was struck, honestly), posession of paraphanelia, and aggrivated trespass. We found the knife.

    Leave a comment:


  • OccamsRazor
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Yeah. I love people like that. Several times, I've had to determine who a security officer was - public authority or private police. The term was foreign to me, being from Florida where merely the WORD police is restricted.
    Yeesh...While working in California, I was asked to cover another beat than my usual one, in an area that surrounds an incorporated resort town. I stopped a car in excess, and as I was making contact, I had a guy walk up behind me (not a good idea) and ask very loudly if I was 'code four'. This guy was a guard for some sort of company in the area. He had parked his car at an angle behind my unit, lit up his amber strobes (visor ones) and decided to back me up. Hell, the car looked at a glance like one of the town's cruisers, and the uniform was very similar.

    The driver of the car was curious was I was so pissed at this guy...He'd thought that the company was a LE agency. He told me of a couple of instances where he'd seen their cars blow lights in the city after lighting off the ambers.

    He got off without a cite for speed, but the guard got one (CVC 25279). I also told his supervisor to have the strobes removed forthwith.

    I have no problem with the lighting, as long as it's used legally. The uniform, vehicle and attitude were a different story. If the difference between a guard and a deputy is imperceptible, there are issues that need to be addressed.

    OTOH, the company that had guards in my usual beat was top-notch. Run by a retired dep, they had pretty high standards. As I was leaving the SO, 2 of the incoming FNGs were former officers for this place. Heh, I had their radio freq in the cruiser's scanner and often showed up on THEIR calls when it was slow...Always a good time.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by wilrobnson
    Sounds like one of the older (not sure if they're still around) security companies around here. The company initials were WSP, so of course a couple of their real wannabees had WSP emblazoned on the backs of their jackets. I used to live in an apartment complex they guarded, and saw this all the time. I'd ask them if they were security or Washington State Patrol officers (knowing full well the answer), and most of the time I'd get something along the lines of "I'm with W-S-P". Sometimes they'd admit after being asked again that they were security, a few of the guys got aggressive about it.
    Yeah. I love people like that. Several times, I've had to determine who a security officer was - public authority or private police. The term was foreign to me, being from Florida where merely the WORD police is restricted.

    I had two of em stop me, their jackets (They weren't wearing uniforms like we would refer to, unless there's some cool jeans and sweatshirt uniform I don't know about...) said SECURITY POLICE, with the police in two inch print, and the security in 1/4th inch print.

    I could of had two SECURITY POLICE jackets, because by the time I was done with them, I had completely dominated the situation. They carried, and did a pedestrian stop on public street with, those yellow "director lite" flashlights. Nothing else, not even a cell phone.

    Oh, I had one. The city police said they were within their rights to detain me for "suspicious activity," because I was out at 9 PM at night near an area with reported burglaries.

    Leave a comment:


  • OccamsRazor
    Guest replied
    Sounds like one of the older (not sure if they're still around) security companies around here. The company initials were WSP, so of course a couple of their real wannabees had WSP emblazoned on the backs of their jackets. I used to live in an apartment complex they guarded, and saw this all the time. I'd ask them if they were security or Washington State Patrol officers (knowing full well the answer), and most of the time I'd get something along the lines of "I'm with W-S-P". Sometimes they'd admit after being asked again that they were security, a few of the guys got aggressive about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Echos13
    You should see PPO and under it Private Protection Officer. We just settled for Security in bold letters for the time being. We thought it would confuse people that we might me with probation and parole. We are considering PSO, but then that looks to much like PCSO. It is amazing how little people pay any attention to what's on a shirt or jacket these days though. Unless it says Police or something like that.
    My favorite one:

    Private 1/2 inch
    POLICE 2 inch
    Officer 1/2 inch

    Leave a comment:


  • Echos13
    replied
    You should see PPO and under it Private Protection Officer. We just settled for Security in bold letters for the time being. We thought it would confuse people that we might me with probation and parole. We are considering PSO, but then that looks to much like PCSO. It is amazing how little people pay any attention to what's on a shirt or jacket these days though. Unless it says Police or something like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by jimmyhat
    Once again, a pulg my state. You'd think I was getting paid for this.

    Virginia started a Private Crime Prevention Practitioner Program for private security personnel. Here's the link if anyones interested.
    http://www.dcjs.virginia.gov/pss/special/pcpp.cfm

    I've alreaay seen a couple of Hard-Core's running around with the title on their jackets.
    You know, I thought PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICER was alot to put on the back of a jacket. That's a mouth full.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by talon
    If you use the word "Security" you are only asking for trouble. Use anything but security. Before I became a "Sworn Officer ooh ahh" I had uniforms with the words "Officer Private Sector" on them, people just couldn't figure out who we were or what our authority was. but Crime Prevention Officer is a great title.
    Most of the states I've seen reserve that title now for a public sector operation, "National Association of Crime Prevention Specialists," which are non-sworn or sworn police officers / reserves trained in crime prevention strategies. They will go INSANE if someone calls themselves a "Crime Prevention Officer," and seek injunction.

    This seems to be related to the fact most crime prevention sections in PD agencies charge for their services. They seemed to have noticed an untapped resource, and are cashing in on it using the public's trust in public law enforcement to do a "better job."

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    You catch it, you clean it.
    You made me laugh. Honestly, I couldn't see arresting someone, and then calling locals or the Sheriff to process them. They don't have that ability, why should a private law enforcement agency think they should?

    Besides, how would they fill out the warrantless arrest affidavit? They didn't establish the probable cause to arrest the suspect.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tennsix
    replied
    Originally posted by talon
    Here in my home state the locals will not transport for you at all. They will say " don't your badge say police?"

    Also Jimmyhat, tell me if I'm right about this, but I believe an armed Security Officer can make an arrest in Va.? and doesnt that include transporting to the magistrate?
    You catch it, you clean it.

    Leave a comment:


  • talon
    replied
    Crime Prevention

    If you use the word "Security" you are only asking for trouble. Use anything but security. Before I became a "Sworn Officer ooh ahh" I had uniforms with the words "Officer Private Sector" on them, people just couldn't figure out who we were or what our authority was. but Crime Prevention Officer is a great title.

    Leave a comment:


  • talon
    replied
    Academy

    If you have completed a full police academy in another state NC will accept it as long as it is Equal to NC's academies, our standards division is very anal about these things.

    Also in order to attend an academy you have to be sponsored by an "agency"
    but private agencies in this state must pay to attend the academy where as public agencies attend for free.

    Last year they raised the annual in service training requirements and I had to pick up the dime for all of my classes while all the other public officers got theirs free.

    It really pisses the public agencies off that now police hopefuls don't have to count on being picked up by them. Now there are more choices and that really pisses the "good ole boys" off because they don't have the final say.

    Like I've said before... they make us abide by the exact same standards but we don't get the same treatment here.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    I hadn't thought about that with you folks, but yeah, I could see why the locals are going, "Your the police, act like it." In that capacity, you'd need a "wagon" unit to process and and book.

    I would of thought that a company who offers private law enforcement services, with sworn officers, would of thought of the transport problem. You are the police, why should another agency transport your prisoners?

    But, then, I'm all for putting cages in cars and trucks. There is an onus on the company to provide a safe and secure place to store their prisoner, special police or private citizen, away from harm and public ridicule. I'd call that the back of a patrol car.

    Leave a comment:

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