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  • #31
    Originally posted by SecTrainer
    I didn't personally care much for this arrangement, frankly. People would treat my house as if it were a precinct station, coming to the door during the day when I was on nights and was trying to sleep, complaining that someone's dog had gotten out again, and there were occasional things like eggs thrown at the squad or the house, etc., among others. You can't sleep in your uniform so you can go screaming out the door after an egg-thrower, or sit behind some drawn curtains watching to see who's gonna sneak up and let the air out of one of your tires, etc. When the car was gone, there would be things done like the occasional yard-farming.

    It also had certain effects on the family and there just really wasn't much you could do about it. Most of the "pranks" weren't of such severity that they amounted to "serious crimes" and much would happen to them if you caught someone (and most were also juveniles), but collectively they added up to make life at home much less relaxing and enjoyable than a police officer or his family should have. You think, "Well, if I can just catch one of them, word will get out", but that wasn't how it worked either. We set up a little "sting" and got lucky on a yard-farmer one Saturday night, but it changed absolutely nothing.

    All of this is to say nothing of being put into a position of possibly having to arrest your neighbors...which might happen anyway during the course of your duties, of course, if you ran across them out in your beat while they were DUI, etc., but that's different from becoming the "heavy" in the neighborhood where you live.

    Naturally, most people in a copper's neighborhood know that he's LE, but somehow the presence of the squad either painted a bull's eye on the house for pranksters (and twice someone worse than that), or else made people think they could just pop next door or across the street whenever they had something to report instead of calling dispatch, etc. like people two blocks over would have done if they had the exact same thing to report.
    Most cops take great pains to keep their occupation private for the very reasons that you site. In addition, if a cop parks a cruiser in his driveway, s/he might catch the attention of someone who's looking for an assassination opportunity to settle a grudge or pass initiation into a street gang.

    I have found that people disrespect security more than LE, but hate LE more than security. Once neighbors know that you are security and not LE, the risk of an ambush decreases, IMO.
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Bridgegate
      In some of the high-end complexes, maybe. But I highly doubt you're going to find LEOs living in a run-down complex in the "ghetto."

      I did it for 3 years from the time I was 23 till I was 26 (and never ever again lol). It's pretty common here. I gave it up when I got custody of my little girl, I couldn't just leave her in the Apartment while I went to deal with a complaint, and didn't want to live in the Ghetto (Pleasant Groove Area for anyone who knows Dallas lol). Lucky I did, a few months later our Chief stopped letting us take Courtesy Officer gigs.

      Around here, the more "upscale" apts hire courtesy patrols. The lower end Apts (in my experiance) are something of a mix of off duty police living on property, and courtesy patrols. It's great not having to pay rent, but being awaken at all hours for non-sense was very taxing....
      ~Black Caesar~
      Corbier's Commandos

      " "The trouble with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Mr. Security
        Most cops take great pains to keep their occupation private for the very reasons that you site. In addition, if a cop parks a cruiser in his driveway, s/he might catch the attention of someone who's looking for an assassination opportunity to settle a grudge or pass initiation into a street gang.

        I have found that people disrespect security more than LE, but hate LE more than security. Once neighbors know that you are security and not LE, the risk of an ambush decreases, IMO.
        I think thats more an Eastern thing. No one I know around here in North Texas (or in Georgia, my wife's cousin is a Detention Deputy with the Chatham Sheriff's Office) goes to great pains to hide it. There are 2 officers in my neighboorhood with Take home cars, and they park them right out front. My College is down the street from Dallas PD's Southwest Division station, and on several occassions we've pulled over people in Dallas PD uniforms.

        I wear my uniform to and from work, as does out entire department (unless someone has a hot date or something). All except our Captain. He's from Upstate New York, wears Civies to Work, changes, and then changes back into civies before going home. Perplexed, we asked him why. He used to Work for the Albany PD and thats how they did things from the day he started working.

        When I was a PSO (Public Service officer, a non-sworn job) at a hopsital police department, one of the Police Officers was from Boston, he did the exact same thing.. Tradition I guess.

        Are people that hard on police back east?
        ~Black Caesar~
        Corbier's Commandos

        " "The trouble with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Black Caesar
          I think thats more an Eastern thing. No one I know around here in North Texas (or in Georgia, my wife's cousin is a Detention Deputy with the Chatham Sheriff's Office) goes to great pains to hide it. There are 2 officers in my neighboorhood with Take home cars, and they park them right out front. My College is down the street from Dallas PD's Southwest Division station, and on several occassions we've pulled over people in Dallas PD uniforms.

          I wear my uniform to and from work, as does out entire department (unless someone has a hot date or something). All except our Captain. He's from Upstate New York, wears Civies to Work, changes, and then changes back into civies before going home. Perplexed, we asked him why. He used to Work for the Albany PD and thats how they did things from the day he started working.

          When I was a PSO (Public Service officer, a non-sworn job) at a hopsital police department, one of the Police Officers was from Boston, he did the exact same thing.. Tradition I guess.

          Are people that hard on police back east?
          Around here, the only cops that take a marked unit home are the K-9 officers. The state police take units home, but they are unmarked (just plain colors like dark blue, silver, brown, etc.) and the officers usually remove the light bar from the roof.

          The NE area isn't too friendly to begin with, and CT is home to some of the wealthiest and best educated people in the nation. Most LE positions up here don't require a 4-year degree and frankly, sometimes it shows. I don't see too many people interacting with the police unless it's business. It's similar to the clicks in high school with college kids and the jocks; not much in common.
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Mr. Security
            ...the officers usually remove the light bar from the roof.
            Interesting - what kind of light bars are that easily removed (other than magnetic, I mean)?
            "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

            "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

            "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

            "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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            • #36
              Originally posted by SecTrainer
              Interesting - what kind of light bars are that easily removed (other than magnetic, I mean)?
              I watched one trooper do it. I believe the light bars are Whelen and each end has quick connect/release hardware (requires a key) made specifically for their cruisers. The wiring harness disconnects as well. I asked him why they do it and he explained that they have had problems with theft/vandalism in the past.
              Last edited by Mr. Security; 12-16-2006, 05:26 PM.
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

              Comment


              • #37
                Kewl beenz! I'll have to look into that, thanks.
                "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by SecTrainer
                  Kewl beenz! I'll have to look into that, thanks.
                  You're welcome.
                  Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Black Caesar
                    I think thats more an Eastern thing. No one I know around here in North Texas (or in Georgia, my wife's cousin is a Detention Deputy with the Chatham Sheriff's Office) goes to great pains to hide it. There are 2 officers in my neighboorhood with Take home cars, and they park them right out front. My College is down the street from Dallas PD's Southwest Division station, and on several occassions we've pulled over people in Dallas PD uniforms.

                    I wear my uniform to and from work, as does out entire department (unless someone has a hot date or something). All except our Captain. He's from Upstate New York, wears Civies to Work, changes, and then changes back into civies before going home. Perplexed, we asked him why. He used to Work for the Albany PD and thats how they did things from the day he started working.

                    When I was a PSO (Public Service officer, a non-sworn job) at a hopsital police department, one of the Police Officers was from Boston, he did the exact same thing.. Tradition I guess.

                    Are people that hard on police back east?
                    In the northeast they are. Take-home vehicles are very uncommon up there and all the cops I know from NY (I lived there my entire life until a few months ago) take great pains to make sure that no one knows that they're affiliated in any way with law enforcement. I've heard stories of deputies getting their vehicles vandalized in store parking lots because they had PBA stickers, etc. on the window.

                    I move down south and I can pick out a cop from 1000 yards. Police-style t-shirts, "thin blue line" stickers on cars, ballcaps, etc. I'm not completely sold on the idea of driving my marked vehicle off-duty, but everyone in the state does it and you can't really argue with a free car and fuel, can you?

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Mr. Security
                      I watched one trooper do it. I believe the light bars are Whelan and each end has quick connect/release hardware (requires a key) made specifically for their cruisers. The wiring harness disconnects as well. I asked him why they do it and he explained that they have had problems with theft/vandalism in the past.
                      Tampa Police had this problem. Someone went into the Franklin Street parking lot, next to the main police headquarters, and removed every lightbar. They immediately switched to bolting the light bars through the roof, instead of the gutter attachments.

                      Whelen, Code 3, and Federal Signal all make gutter "grippers" that do not require bolting on. Yeah, after that, they stopped using the gutter grippers and went to bolting through the roof.
                      Some Kind of Commando Leader

                      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                        Whelen, Code 3, and Federal Signal all make gutter "grippers" that do not require bolting on. Yeah, after that, they stopped using the gutter grippers and went to bolting through the roof.
                        Of course they do...it's the quick-disconnect wiring harness that intrigues me.
                        "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                        "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                        "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                        "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          I think that's a Whelen thing. Although, if you factory order, they'll do anything you want to the wiring harness for a price... I haven't seen it offered, though, through any vendor I know of.
                          Some Kind of Commando Leader

                          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                          Comment

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