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gifts & ethics

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  • CameraMan
    replied
    See? That's what I'm saying.

    Leave a comment:


  • Curtis Baillie
    replied
    Originally posted by CameraMan View Post
    Vendors give us free crap all the time. I mean, all. The. Time. Seriously, I'm at my computer at work as I type this, and ten minutes ago a vendor just walked up to me and handed me a flashlight- I didn't even know he was here.

    Is that ethically dubious?

    I don't know- I am more inclined to push a vendor who gives us free stuff. I will never sell anything I don't believe in, however. if your product sucks it sucks and I simply won't recomend it.
    I don't know your companies policys, but your statement I am more inclined to push a vendor who gives us free stuff' would be cause for concern if I was your ethics officer.

    Leave a comment:


  • CameraMan
    replied
    Vendors give us free crap all the time. I mean, all. The. Time. Seriously, I'm at my computer at work as I type this, and ten minutes ago a vendor just walked up to me and handed me a flashlight- I didn't even know he was here.

    Is that ethically dubious?

    I don't know- I am more inclined to push a vendor who gives us free stuff. I will never sell anything I don't believe in, however. if your product sucks it sucks and I simply won't recomend it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Curtis Baillie
    replied
    Originally posted by craig333 View Post
    I'm not sure what company policy is. In training we were told we shouldn't. Personally I believe as long as it doesn't effect the way you provide services, I don't see a problem with it. Only thing I've ever received was a cup of coffee.
    I recommend that everyone be aware of what their company's ethics and conflict of interest policies are. They should be in writing.

    Badge 714 - I once had a manager contact me if it was OK to take an expensive, ($300), leather jacket from a vendor. My response was, - if he wants to give the same jacket to all of your employees, then it's OK. That would of included about 150 employees, ($45,000). You can guess what the response was.

    Leave a comment:


  • craig333
    replied
    I'm not sure what company policy is. In training we were told we shouldn't. Personally I believe as long as it doesn't effect the way you provide services, I don't see a problem with it. Only thing I've ever received was a cup of coffee.

    Leave a comment:


  • Badge714
    replied
    When I used to work for the biggest guard outfit in the US, we had a client who gave each of his employees a turkey and a ham at Thanksgiving. He included the guards in this program for years.
    One year, a shiny new site supervisor thought that is was wrong to accept the client's turkeys, because it looks bad, and might lead him to expect special treatment. The District Manager agreed, and told the guards "no turkeys!"
    The guards squawked to me, and I reminded the District Manager that the person who was giving us the guards turkeys was the same person who signed our contract - and our checks - and he BETTER get "special treatment!"
    The District Manager reversed himself, but not in time for the guards to get their turkeys.

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Just thought I would bring this 1 forward since we are discussing accepting gifts in a hotel security post.

    The day I resigned from 1 LPM job to accept an NLPM role, a lady whose bag stolen that I recovered from a thief (he dumped it not knowing it was loaded with $$ from her firm) came to see me with a thank you card + $250.00 gift card. I declined her offer until she reminded me I had resigned and would be let go soon, so I could technically accept it from her. After a big thank you to her , I purchased a new leather work bag for $10.00 more than the card and was let go 1 hour later. This same bag has travelled around Australia with me and still reminds me of the day my life moved on.

    Leave a comment:


  • DizZy SO
    replied
    Originally posted by BHR Lawson
    I do hope you mean, "white collar" folks.
    Yes I do. White collar not color. Sorry about that. Hope I didn't offend anyone or myself for that matter.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Andy Taylor
    I was using "bribe" as in being paid to do something you should not do, such as "Hey Mr. Security Guard, disappear around back for 15 minutes and I will give you this $50." While technically not illegal as a bribe (aiding and abetting issues aside) it is definatly unethical. As opposed to escorting a customer to their car, and upon arrival at the car, the customer offering a $5 tip.
    I was not using "bribe" as a legal term.
    Every one in a while, someone's been told by their company that you can bribe a security guard, and both the guard and the person can go to jail for it (Or only the guard, usually...)

    Its amazing what companies will tell employees.

    Leave a comment:


  • flashlightcop509
    replied
    Per company policy, we are supposed to decline any tips or offerings as it were; However, and mind you, we're not talking about a guest offering me a Fifty because I wrote him up for parking in a tow zone or likewise another guest offering me Five bucks because I brought them fresh bedsheets or a blanket and some firestarters...

    That said, if the situation arises where a guest offers me a gratuity, I will of course decline...

    BUT

    If they press the issue and ask me a second time to accept it, then there is nothing my Office can do since I truthfully rejected the first offer...

    Leave a comment:


  • copelandamuffy
    replied
    Excluding the BFI trashman we have no one visit our closed down Industrial site. But do read below


    With the many wildlife on site of 144 acers of woods occasioanlly we do
    offer baby sitting services to the Deer, Bobcats, and Badgers, and they
    reward us with cups of coffee.

    Have a Good Christmas Guys and Gals.

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy Taylor
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Its amusing because you can't actually bribe a security person unless they have specific authority vested in them by the state, and are considered "public employees."

    While it may be against company policy to take tips, you can't usually bribe a security person legally.
    I was using "bribe" as in being paid to do something you should not do, such as "Hey Mr. Security Guard, disappear around back for 15 minutes and I will give you this $50." While technically not illegal as a bribe (aiding and abetting issues aside) it is definatly unethical. As opposed to escorting a customer to their car, and upon arrival at the car, the customer offering a $5 tip.
    I was not using "bribe" as a legal term.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lawson
    replied
    Originally posted by DizZy SO
    (which is going to be thrown in the garbage if we don’t take it anyway because these white color folks wont eat perfectly good food made the day before).
    I do hope you mean, "white collar" folks.

    Leave a comment:


  • DizZy SO
    replied
    Our company policy is that we are not allowed to aspects any gifts, tips, food or anything that may construe as a conflict of interest and/or involvement with or compromise our official position with the company. If the person wont take "no thank you" for an answer than we can take it and send it to the regional manger and they’ll keep it , well they are to return it to the person.

    I work in a corporate setting and like cp73 said some of them feel like they own us. The only stuff we get is food from facilities (whatever they didn’t eat), cleaners, and the cooks (which is going to be thrown in the garbage if we don’t take it anyway because these white collar folks wont eat perfectly good food made the day before).
    Last edited by DizZy SO; 12-07-2006, 09:50 AM. Reason: typo

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Special Investigator
    I very often get free cups of coffee, soda or food because the business wants me to stop in. My presence at these businesses often scares off the panhandlers, drug dealers, gangbangers and those who loiter and normaly bother their paying customers. I hang around for awhile and make my presance known and then slip away usally unnoticed. I see nothing wrong with accepting small 'gifts'.
    There was a company in Florida that had a Circle K go after them for failing to provide services. They alleged that the company was compensated in product (free food and coffee) for providing security services several times a night.

    Normally, this would be a no brainer, but the security company's agents took on the role of service provider, by removing people or "patrolling" on site, in the name of the Circle K. This created all that was needed to hit them with "failure to provide services," the only saving grace was that in Florida, any contract over $500 dollars must be written.

    Leave a comment:

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