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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    All I can say is, I knew what a nanometer was, as well as monochromatic.

    All light can be measured in Kelvin. I learned this when I started playing with Photoshop, as well in studying photography, and playing with lasers.

    I'm not that well versed in measuring lighting in nanometer on the EM field, I'm usually describing lighting in Degrees Kelvin (3000-5000 or so) for getting rid of red eye and other crap.

    Thanks, Bill. Both for telling everyone what it was way better than I could, and for whipping out the Phillips Lighting Manual.
    You and Mr. Security are most welcome. All of us in this business, security companies, security consultants should have a Lighting Manual at hand. I like Philips because they explain every aspect. I can not speak for other luminary makers.
    N.A., it is neat, the Kelvin scale its temperature scale has its zero point at -270 degrees Celsius.
    As for the explanation, it is so important in a survey when you are trying to help a fellow professional. Most of my training was at government expense for the work I was doing within the DOD and DOJ communities.
    Thanks again.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by ACP01
    All I can say is, "I am glad someone with your indepth knowledge and experieance is willing to share what they have learned. Thank you."
    You are welcome.
    We are all in this together and there is more than enough work for all of us, so if we share, we all gain, if we don't, none of us gain.
    If you have a chance, please see if any of your company's management has any association with the Illumination Engineers Society-North America? Those folks are a godsend for us in this profession.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    All I can say is, I knew what a nanometer was, as well as monochromatic.

    All light can be measured in Kelvin. I learned this when I started playing with Photoshop, as well in studying photography, and playing with lasers.

    I'm not that well versed in measuring lighting in nanometer on the EM field, I'm usually describing lighting in Degrees Kelvin (3000-5000 or so) for getting rid of red eye and other crap.

    Thanks, Bill. Both for telling everyone what it was way better than I could, and for whipping out the Phillips Lighting Manual.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by ACP01
    All I can say is, "I am glad someone with your indepth knowledge and experieance is willing to share what they have learned. Thank you."
    I second that. I thought I did well in physics, but I guess I missed a few lessons.

    There isn't going to be a quiz on this, is there? By the way, here's a layman's method for determining which flashlight is brighter: Simply point it at your eyes and turn it on for a moment. The longer you're blind the brighter the flashlight. (I know; not very bright - pun intended)

    Leave a comment:


  • ACP01
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    You must use a footcandle meter. Select a matte surface. The light-sensitive element is faced toward the surface and slowly withdraw about 2 to 6 inches until the meter reading (A) is constant. A second reading (B) is taken when the light-sensitive element on the surface facing out to measure the incident light. Reading A divided by Reading B gives an approximate value for the reflectance on the surface.
    CP= Footcandles X D(Superscript 2)
    (D= Distance in feet from source to illuminated surface.)
    Please remember: Inverse Square Law. The strength of a field or the intensity of radiation decreases in proportion to the square of the distance from its source.
    Mr. Security, that information comes from Philips "Lighting Handbook." I take it along with my guide on every survey I conduct.
    I normally recommend a "Lighting Consultant" visit the site and make this recommendations which are appended to my report along with other speciality consultants reports for a particular survey. We just can't wing it. That is why completed surveys are so expensive, minus travel, food and lodging.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill
    All I can say is, "I am glad someone with your indepth knowledge and experieance is willing to share what they have learned. Thank you."

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Bear with me on this one. If I have a Surefire that's rated at 175 lumens, how much candlepower is that and how did you calculate it?
    You must use a footcandle meter. Select a matte surface. The light-sensitive element is faced toward the surface and slowly withdraw about 2 to 6 inches until the meter reading (A) is constant. A second reading (B) is taken when the light-sensitive element on the surface facing out to measure the incident light. Reading A divided by Reading B gives an approximate value for the reflectance on the surface.
    CP= Footcandles X D(Superscript 2)
    (D= Distance in feet from source to illuminated surface.)
    Please remember: Inverse Square Law. The strength of a field or the intensity of radiation decreases in proportion to the square of the distance from its source.
    Mr. Security, that information comes from Philips "Lighting Handbook." I take it along with my guide on every survey I conduct.
    I normally recommend a "Lighting Consultant" visit the site and make this recommendations which are appended to my report along with other speciality consultants reports for a particular survey. We just can't wing it. That is why completed surveys are so expensive, minus travel, food and lodging.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Bear with me on this one. If I have a Surefire that's rated at 175 lumens, how much candlepower is that and how did you calculate it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Is there a formula for converting candlepower into lumens?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    Gentlemen: These is a security lighting term. A nanometer is a unit of measure equal to one billionth of a meter. So are lux, lumen, luminous intensity or candlepower and luminous flux. When we discuss visible light, which is very small part of the electromagnetic spectrum, wavelength is measured in nanometers...
    Is there a formula for converting candlepower into lumens?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    [QUOTE=Wisconsinite] nanowhaters? monochrohuh? speak english, man! LOL
    [QUOTE]
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    English version please.
    Gentlemen: These is a security lighting term. A nanometer is a unit of measure equal to one billionth of a meter. So are lux, lumen, luminous intensity or candlepower and luminous flux. When we discuss visible light, which is very small part of the electromagnetic spectrum, wavelength is measured in nanometers.
    These are the kinds of things we in this business need to know to insure we go home at night in the same physical condition as when we reported to our post or job.
    When you are on post and you know in your heart of hearts the lighting stinks where you patrol either not enough or you instead of the perimeter is lighted, your very life may depend on adequate lighting of the proper kind and intensity. Lighting is just a tool like your radio, flashlight, baton, sidearm and chemical spray.
    Your company may request the client conduct a lighting survey. If your company is worth its salt, a knowledgeable person will visit the site to observe what you observed and hopefully push the client into hiring a lighting consultant.
    Various manufacturers publish lighting handbooks. ST&D from time to time publish articles written by lighting consultants.
    I would encourage all of us to obtain a handbook from the company's library and read. Suggest you further purchase such a handbook to add to your personal security library.
    Please remember, if we screw up, we may not go home at the end of the shift!
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    N.A., LPS characteristics in which virtually all the visible energy is emitted from the "D" lines double at 589 and 589.6 nanometers (yellow) near the peak of the visibility curve of the eye, monochromatic.
    Safety markings, black and yellow jumb out at you when illuminated by LPS.
    Enjoy the snowfall and the day,
    Bill
    English version please.

    Leave a comment:


  • wisconsinite
    replied
    nanowhaters? monochrohuh? speak english, man! LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    You know, people do look creepy under that unnatural pale... what is that? Pink? lighting.
    N.A., LPS characteristics in which virtually all the visible energy is emitted from the "D" lines double at 589 and 589.6 nanometers (yellow) near the peak of the visibility curve of the eye, monochromatic.
    Safety markings, black and yellow jumb out at you when illuminated by LPS.
    Enjoy the snowfall and the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by wisconsinite
    You wanna repel teenaged loiterers? teenagers intent on doing ill deeds? Blast some .....classical music... That'll get them running like cockroaches when the lights go on! LOL
    I like this idea. Opera would be another fine choice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charger
    replied
    We use the icky bluish-green sodiums here... And it works quite well... People tend to slink away from those areas... Somethin about those unnatural colors, I guess... lol

    Leave a comment:

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