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  • #46
    Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
    Well the statute reads:

    Sec. 34. (NEW) (Effective October 1, 2004) The licensee of a security service shall issue to each uniformed employee a metal or woven insignia of a design approved by the Commissioner of Public Safety, with an inscription thereon containing the word "security", the name of the licensee and an identification number. Such insignia shall be conspicuously worn at all times by the employee when in uniform and acting in the service of the licensee, and the commissioner may prescribe the manner of displaying such insignia. As used in this section, "uniform" means any manner or type of dress of a particular style and distinctive appearance as distinguished from clothing usually worn by the public.

    I am going to have my lawyer get a thumbs up for a patch that meets the requirements as it states " Woven or Metal " if the patch get's approval then from the statute I would think that I could use any type of badge we want as long as it states " Security " on it - No?. I'll see what the lawyer thinks :O)
    That sounds like any fabric logo or metal insignia, not just a badge. It must be approved by the Commissioner (Is this where square badges come in?) and must have some approved wording. Oh, and you have to display it at all times.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
      04-192 did not take effect until this past October of 2004
      Ah yeah, that's what I already said.

      Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
      ..it's always been the goofy looking badges as I'v been wearing them for 20 years while working for any contract service...
      Not necessarily. I have worked for at least 2 contract companies in Conn. and that wasn't the case.
      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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      • #48
        Watch your state's proposed legislation.

        As we know, several NE states have enacted laws that require contract s/o's to where heavy, ugly, square metal badges. Your state may be next. If you think that security doesn't get enough respect, wait until you are required to wear one of these. Don't let it happen in your state. Legislators like to sneak this stuff through, so keep on the watch or else you could end up looking like a bozo.
        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Mr. Security
          As we know, several NE states have enacted laws that require contract s/o's to where heavy, ugly, square metal badges. Your state may be next. If you think that security doesn't get enough respect, wait until you are required to wear one of these. Don't let it happen in your state. Legislators like to sneak this stuff through, so keep on the watch or else you could end up looking like a bozo.
          Those states also define police officers or special peace officers all over the place, I've found. Example: NY and NJ have special peace officers for all private colleges, etc. School districts also ahve specials.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

          Comment


          • #50
            Several years ago (early 1990's) in California a state assemblyman introduced a bill that would require all uniformed security in the state to wear slate-grey shirts and pants. In addition security could not wear any type of metal badge, they would all have to be a sew-on cloth badge.

            The bill was prompted by a spate of private security guards who wore uniforms, badges, and patches very similar to the local police. These guards were making traffic stops in their security cars, coincidently marked and equipped like a police car. If the occupants of the stopped cars were men they would be robbed and if women, raped.

            If I remember correctly the bill died in committee, but came very close to being passed. I kind of think this is a good idea, since only one law enforcement agency in the state wears grey. The Alameda County Sheriff's Department wears slate-grey shirt's and navy-blue pants. I understand that the other surrounding departments give the Alameda boys and girls a hard time about "looking like security guards."

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            • #51
              Indiana has a statute that protects the integrity of municipal and county police agencies. The law says no law enforcement or security agency may create/wear uniforms that closely resemble that of municiple and county police officers. The law says no law enforcement or security agencies may wear/create uniforms that closely resemble "regular" local officers. Many reserve, special, and auxillary units had to modify their uniforms.
              Last edited by Tennsix; 03-17-2006, 11:16 PM.
              I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
              -Lieutenant Commander Data
              sigpic

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              • #52
                Here in SoCal at least, you cannot tell the difference between a reserve and a regular police officer/deputy sheriff just by looking for the most part. In the LAPD, the only difference in uniform and equipment between regulars and reserves is that the badge numbers of reserves begin with "R". For example a reserve's badge number would be something like "R12345". Many departments do not even have that difference, reserves look identical to regulars. And that is how I think it should be.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by histfan71
                  Here in SoCal at least, you cannot tell the difference between a reserve and a regular police officer/deputy sheriff just by looking for the most part. In the LAPD, the only difference in uniform and equipment between regulars and reserves is that the badge numbers of reserves begin with "R". For example a reserve's badge number would be something like "R12345". Many departments do not even have that difference, reserves look identical to regulars. And that is how I think it should be.
                  In some states, reserve police officers are, in fact, not sworn police officers, and are more of a "volunteer in policing" position, much like a Community Service Officer.

                  Some sworn officers believe that the concept of reserve/auxiliary/special police take away from either their overtime potential, or their straight time potential, and view them as a threat to their livelyhood.

                  In other states, a reserve police officer is just that, a police officer who is kept in reserve for rapid deployment of manpower. They ride with regular officers, or ride alone (Reserve II deputies in Hillsbrough County, Florida, are a good example of riding alone - they are paid reserve deputy sheriffs with full powers.), and provide a doubling of force projection.

                  Up north, I've found that reserve police officers are generally there to "free up" sworn police officers from mundane or trivial tasks, such as accident reporting, etc, so that the sworn officers can focus on street level policing.
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Many of the departments in OR have Reserve programs, and it sounds like they're a mix of the different things you mentioned... They ARE non-paid volunteers, BUT they go through a (slightly) lessened academy, and DO have full police authority while they're on duty.. But ONLY while on duty...
                    The majority of them have a limit to hours worked, but also mandate that they work at least a weekend each month, sometimes more/less depending on department... On top of that, they get used routinely for special events like county fairs, etc...
                    I haven't been here in WA long enough to know the specifics, but from what I've gathered from local Officers it's pretty much the same thing...
                    Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
                    Originally posted by ValleyOne
                    BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
                    Shoulda called in sick.
                    Be safe!

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                    • #55
                      In California it is a little more complicated. There are three levels of reserve officers:

                      Level I: Gets exactly the same basic academy training as a regular officer, must complete 400 hours with an FTO, can work solo, and do everything that a regular officer can do. Generally they only have peace officer powers while on duty and directly to and from their assignment. However, the chief of police or county sheriff can "designate" a Level I reserve to have 24/7 peace officer status. Most departments do not "designate" their reserves, but LAPD was one of the few that did.

                      Level II: Their academy is about 150 hours less then a full basic academy. While California POST does not require FTO training for Level II's most departments put them through the full 400 hour program. Level II's cannot work alone and must be in the immediate vicinity of a regular officer or a Level I reserve. Otherwise they can do most everything a regular officer can do, except work solo.

                      Level III: Their academy is only about 200 hours long; it varies by the training provider. Again, no FTO is required, and most departments DO NOT require FTO training for Level III's. They are only allowed to do support roles, so they cannot go on patrol or perform duties where arrests are likely. They do such things as work the front desk, the jail, transport prisoners, parade and special event security, etc. Like Level II's, they cannot work alone unless transporting prisoners, and must be under the immediate supervision of a regular officer or Level I reserve when doing anything else.

                      As far as pay goes most reserves are volunteers, some departments do pay, but will put a limit on the number of hours you can work. One small department here (the city is just over 1 square mile and has a population of about 100 people) pays their reserves the same rate as regular officers but they limit you to no more than 1000 hours per year.

                      Most regular officers like and respect reserves, since unlike most other states, Level I reserves have to meet exactly the same hiring and training standards as regular officers. Also many departments, especially the smaller ones, hire extensively from their reserves, so many regular officers started their careers as reserves. Sure, there are a few hardcases who think that reserves are not "real" cops and that reserves are out to steal their jobs, but thankfully those are in the minority. In my 10 years as an LAPD reserve I got nothing but praise and thanks from the regular officers.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by histfan71
                        Several years ago (early 1990's) in California a state assemblyman introduced a bill that would require all uniformed security in the state to wear slate-grey shirts and pants. In addition security could not wear any type of metal badge, they would all have to be a sew-on cloth badge.

                        The bill was prompted by a spate of private security guards who wore uniforms, badges, and patches very similar to the local police. These guards were making traffic stops in their security cars, coincidently marked and equipped like a police car. If the occupants of the stopped cars were men they would be robbed and if women, raped.

                        If I remember correctly the bill died in committee, but came very close to being passed. I kind of think this is a good idea, since only one law enforcement agency in the state wears grey.....
                        I have no issues with embroidered badges that are sown on, and gray is fine with me as well. It is not difficult to manufacture metal badges that clearly distinguish security from LE w/o requiring it to be square. For example, crossing guards have badges that are not square, and so does the AAA School Patrol program.

                        Unfortunately, it only takes a couple numbskulls in security pretending to be LE coupled with some paranoia from a state representative to ruin it for the rest of us.
                        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Firemankoz
                          No you'll laugh to hard!
                          We also wear a white shirt, navy pants with a grey stripe, and the navy trooper hat. winter we wear the blue turtle neck under the long sleeve shirt..
                          ( I hate ties) and summer short sleeves, allthough I am in short sleeves year round!..........tried to send pix but file is to large, give me your e-mail and I'll send them to ya
                          Koz
                          i have to wear a tie(clip on) we dont wear badges.we have to have our licence displayed i wear mine on my duty belt.my uniform is white shirts with company name in blue,black slides (cant remember what they are called)with company name in blue,black tie,black pants.

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                          • #58
                            In Indiana, reserves must be volunteers. The unit may be paid but the individual officer may not. The moment the officer receives pay, he is considered a professional police officer and must complete the police academy within one year. However, only regular officer may attend the academy. The only reserves with academy training are those that were once regulars.

                            A big reason my previous PD disbanned the reserve unit was because they worked for free. If shift was short, a reserve would be called in. In turn, that cost a regular officer eights hours of O.T.
                            Last edited by Tennsix; 03-18-2006, 11:03 AM.
                            I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
                            -Lieutenant Commander Data
                            sigpic

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by histfan71
                              Several years ago (early 1990's) in California a state assemblyman introduced a bill that would require all uniformed security in the state to wear slate-grey shirts and pants. In addition security could not wear any type of metal badge, they would all have to be a sew-on cloth badge.

                              The bill was prompted by a spate of private security guards who wore uniforms, badges, and patches very similar to the local police. These guards were making traffic stops in their security cars, coincidently marked and equipped like a police car. If the occupants of the stopped cars were men they would be robbed and if women, raped.

                              If I remember correctly the bill died in committee, but came very close to being passed. I kind of think this is a good idea, since only one law enforcement agency in the state wears grey. The Alameda County Sheriff's Department wears slate-grey shirt's and navy-blue pants. I understand that the other surrounding departments give the Alameda boys and girls a hard time about "looking like security guards."
                              I shudder when thinking about that. Grey is just ugly to me.
                              "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Tennsix
                                Indiana has a statute that protects the integrity of municipal and county police agencies. The law says no law enforcement or security agency may create/wear uniforms that closely resemble that of municiple and county police officers. The law says no law enforcement or security agencies may wear/create uniforms that closely resemble "regular" local officers. Many reserve, special, and auxillary units had to modify their uniforms.
                                I heard they tried passing something like that here as well in 2003, but there was talk about statewide ugly looking goober uniforms. We would have been mandated to wear yellow or red polo shirts with khaki pants and the uniforms I have been so proud to wear would have been outlawed. The following colors would have been prohibited: navy blue, light blue, black, brown, tan. I heard they were discussing banning things like leather gear and making regulations for security vehicles that would have banned any and all flashing lights and blue striping. I am happy this was either just a vicious rumor or it died in committee.
                                "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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