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Patrol vehicles, what do you get to drive?

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    What is that, red and red, or red and blue?

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  • ocp
    replied
    vehicle inspection

    incase you are wondering how we can use this set up with our vehicles. we have letters from the Dept. of Public Safety here in Columbus. we do get alot of contract security officers or smaller police dept. drive up to us and say "you cant have that". all we do is pull out the letter, copy of the laws, and advise them they are on our property, and then send them on their way. i do think that all forms of security patrol department should be able to use anything but maybe blue lights on their vehicles. yes we are not law enforcement, but we see more of the crime and deal with more criminals then alot of Police officers do. the envroment that i patrol in is mostly HUD houseing, and inner-city. the local Police officers in our area are too busy because they are under staffed, so most of the crimnals in my area see Secuirty alot more then they see the Police. futhermore, because of the under staffed local police department, you see less and less of those Police officers working extra duty at stores, apartments, and so forth. this forces the owners of these properties to hire private security to fill in for the short fall. a good example of this will be this Satuday when OSU plays Michigan, all Columbus Officers have to work 12 hour shifts, and will be patrolling a small part of our city ( around the OSU campus). so this leaves the rest of our city short of responding officers.

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  • ocp
    replied
    this is a bad pic of my office

    this pic was taken with a video cam, so the pix are low. as you can see our patrol cars do not use green in the lightbar. we are a "in-house" department, our vehicles only operate on the owners property. contract security here in Columbus can only us green or amber. we do not have cages in the cars, but we do have computers, L.E.D. lighting, spotlights, and P.A. systems. we use UHF radios, and our computers just have the paperwork and forms that we use in the field ( no records check or leads).
    Attached Files
    Last edited by ocp; 11-17-2006, 02:36 PM.

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  • Lawson
    replied
    Originally posted by ocp
    I want to place a pic of our patrol cars on this forum, can't figure it out. i am new to this.
    If it is saved on your computer, go to www.tinypic.com, then upload the photo. Copy the link that resembes this (IMG)www.tinypic.com/2j5245kl.jpg(/IMG) and paste that into your post. If the photo is already on the net, just post the URL with the IMG brackets around it. Note: replace the () with [ ]

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  • ocp
    replied
    new to this

    I want to place a pic of our patrol cars on this forum, can't figure it out. i am new to this.

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  • ocp
    replied
    not your normal security patrol vehicle

    Our department uses Crown Vics, they are marked with a door badge and lettering, the lightbars are purple to the front, and red / amber to the rear. also our Chief has installed l.e.d. bars in the back window. if i can figure out how to up load an image, i would show you. (i am new to this)

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Most states that codify arrest give private citizens the same powers as LEOs in use of force and retaking of escaped prisoners. Why? Because if the state doesn't empower LEOs to have statewide jurisdiction, then a LEO who takes action outside of their jurisdiction has to use the same powers available to the rest of us.

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  • cp73
    replied
    As far as vehicles:

    I've driven just about everything, from a beat up, POS Suburban that was literally falling apart around me, to brand new Impalas, to Quads. Currently, we're using 2004 Jeep Liberty (I do NOT recommend these things..."trail rated" my rear. They get stuck in a gob of spit.). We also have two Trek mountain bikes, and a 2006 Yamaha Rhino 660.

    As far as the "powers of arrest" question:

    I LOVE Nevada.

    NRS 171.126 Arrest by private person. A private person may arrest another:
    1. For a public offense committed or attempted in his presence.
    2. When the person arrested has committed a felony, although not in his presence.
    3. When a felony has been in fact committed, and he has reasonable cause for believing the person arrested to have committed it.
    (Added to NRS by 1967, 1402)

    Personally, I wouldn't try this one, but:

    NRS 171.138 Breaking open door or window: Making arrest. To make an arrest, a private person, if the offense is a felony, and in all cases a peace officer, may break open a door or window of the house, structure or other place of concealment in which the person to be arrested is, or in which there is reasonable grounds for believing him to be, after having demanded admittance and explained the purpose for which admittance is desired.
    (Added to NRS by 1967, 1402; A 1983, 244)

    NRS 171.134 Escape or rescue of arrested person: Pursuit and retaking at any time and place in State. If a person arrested escapes or is rescued, the person from whose custody he escaped or was rescued may immediately pursue and retake him at any time and in any place within the State.
    (Added to NRS by 1967, 1402)


    NRS 171.144 Breaking open door or window: Retaking person arrested. To retake a person arrested who has escaped or been rescued, the person pursuing may break open an outer or inner door or window of a dwelling house, structure or other place of concealment, if, after notice of his intention, he is refused admittance.
    (Added to NRS by 1967, 1402)

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  • officergossman
    replied
    When I worked security at coal mines during a layoff, we drove "white chevy 4x4 trucks" which was fun to take off road when chasing kids on ATVs

    I drove a ford focus when i did walmart security...hated it!

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    I believe you Nathan. I'm not saying it's illegal. In fact, case law has been used to substantiate it. What I am saying is that a prosecutor could try to make an issue out of it since the wording is not crystal clear. The wise thing to do is make sure that you have the backing of the local DA before you arrest on a misdemeanor. If so, no problem.
    Indeed, unless you're company specifically advertises itself as private law enforcement services (and some do in this state), you won't be enforcing laws through citizen's arrest. Those that do usually have the blessing of their local DA (who is elected), their sheriff (who is elected), and their police department (who probably has half the force working for you part time for more hours.)

    One that was here that comes to mind is Metro Racine Safety Enforcement. They don't call themselves private police, but they run red lights to the front, they make arrests, they work with the local police, and some of the guys who work for them are cops.

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Keep in mind there are several companies in this state that routinely make arrests for breaches of the peace (disorderly conduct), and their respective public police agencies actually like them. I know, I've asked the cops involved, and they freakin LOVE their "private police" counterparts cause it means less work for them.
    I believe you Nathan. I'm not saying it's illegal. In fact, case law has been used to substantiate it. What I am saying is that a prosecutor could try to make an issue out of it since the wording is not crystal clear. The wise thing to do is make sure that you have the backing of the local DA before you arrest on a misdemeanor. If so, no problem.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    http://drl.wi.gov/drl/drllookup/Lice...49&credtype=62
    Name: JP DEE INC,
    License number: 16049
    Location:
    KENOSHA, WI 53143

    Profession: Private Detective Agency (62)

    Current through: 31-AUG-2007
    Status: ACTIVE
    Eligible to practice: YES
    Granted on: 14-MAR-2000
    Discipline: No
    Speciality description: Not applicable
    Doing Business As: KENOSHA PRIVATE POLICE & DIVISIONS

    ...

    The Frederick Group has recently bought Schmitt Security Police, so they're now calling themselves "Schmitt Protective Services a division of the Federick Group."

    This means I'll just go out tomorrow and get pictures of their patrol cars that say "SCHMITT SECURITY POLICE" on them.

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  • Special Investigator
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Keep in mind there are several companies in this state that routinely make arrests for breaches of the peace (disorderly conduct), and their respective public police agencies actually like them.
    That would depend on the seroiusness of the offense. You cannot make a citizens arrest for trespassing for example.


    I know, I've asked the cops involved, and they freakin LOVE their "private police" counterparts cause it means less work for them.
    I find that hard to believe. Most don't want you to do their job. If they do, then they are lazy cops. And again, "private police" are illegal in WI. Anyone who calls themselves private police can be accused of inpersanation.


    Breach of the peace is an act which involves, threatens or incites violence.
    It means just that. A act of violence and you MUST WITNESS the act.

    Too many security persons around these parts get into trouble when they step over their authority. I've seen many a security persons place citizens under citizens arrest and then get sued by the folks they arrest/detain. Your walking on egg shells when you invoke the citizen arrest thing. You must be careful when you do.


    Cheers

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    That's it in a nutshell. I don't think that Wisconsin is the only state like that either. I'll stick to felony arrests and even then, it will only be a last resort.
    Keep in mind there are several companies in this state that routinely make arrests for breaches of the peace (disorderly conduct), and their respective public police agencies actually like them. I know, I've asked the cops involved, and they freakin LOVE their "private police" counterparts cause it means less work for them.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    If citizen's arrest for breach of the peace is illegal, then there are several police officers and deputies who did not have arrest authority in their jurisdiction who need to go to jail for unlawful detainment.

    I'll need to find the cases in LexisNexis, but I learned about Wisconsin's citizen's arrest caselaw from Florida's citizen's arrest caselaw, which references it liberally.

    Till then, I'm gonna grab my copy of the Wisconsin Private Investigation and Security Guard Code Book. And link to it...

    http://drl.wi.gov/boards/ral/code/codebook.pdf

    Page 112, first column...
    Originally posted by Page 112
    You are also authorized by law to make a "citizen's arrest". Every
    citizen has the authority to arrest a person he or she has probable
    cause to believe is guilty of a felony he or she knows has been
    ´╗┐committed. A citizen may arrest a person who is committing a breach of the peace in his or her presence. Breach of the peace is an act which involves, threatens or incites violence.

    A citizen making an arrest must clearly indicate his or her intention to the other person. He or she must indicate for what offense the arrest is being made. As soon as possible, he or she must tum over custody of the person to a peace officer. If these requirements are not met, the citizen may be liable for false imprisonment. In reality, you will seldom, if ever, use this "citizen's arrest" authority. It is customary and safer for all persons involved to leave the arrest to the police.
    There is the standard "never do this" disclaimer because they'd be beaten with sharp sticks by the police unions if it wasn't there, but it IS there.

    A breach of the peace is any offense that threatens or incites violence, according to Wisconsin code. DUI is a breach of the peace, under various case laws, as there's the element of violence (ramming into people, killing them, running them off the road in an 'accident')

    This is why several law enforcement officers who have no jurisdiction outside of their municipal area in Wisconsin have gotten away with making arrests for people who are DUI.

    Special Investigator is the second police officer who has said, "You're full of sh-" about this, then reviewed the case law and went, "Wow. I was told to arrest a security guard if they ever tried to arrest anyone." They then realized that this means they themselves have "certain powers" outside of their jursidictional boundries.
    Last edited by N. A. Corbier; 11-12-2006, 09:36 PM.

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