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College Student Tasered

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  • College Student Tasered

    This is becoming a popular thing, students getting tasered. Maybe they should get credit for it. Tasered 101.

    http://abclocal.go.com/wjrt/story?se...cal&id=4738161

  • #2
    Perhaps he understands the need to respect authority now.
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Mr. Security
      Perhaps he understands the need to respect authority now.
      Doubtful. The day of the incident, he had a quote on his Facebook profile that said something like "I'm always testing the limits of authority to see how far I can go." Since then, it's been changed to a Thoreau quote.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jackhole
        Doubtful. The day of the incident, he had a quote on his Facebook profile that said something like "I'm always testing the limits of authority to see how far I can go." Since then, it's been changed to a Thoreau quote.
        This is not the same incident... This is not the UCLA student, this is something else.
        "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

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        • #5
          Originally posted by davis002
          This is not the same incident... This is not the UCLA student, this is something else.
          Oh, my bad. See what happens when you don't click the link?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jackhole
            "I'm always testing the limits of authority to see how far I can go." Since then, it's been changed to a Thoreau quote.
            If thats true, I say don't be suprised when authority tests your limits to see how far you can go.
            "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
            "The Curve" 1998

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            • #7
              The important thing to keep in mind here: the student was not Tased for refusing to remove his hat. The student was Tased because he, of his own free will, escalated the situation and assaulted a police officer. The headline for this story should instead read, "Student Tased After Assaulting a Police Officer."

              He has no one to blame but himself.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by LPGuy
                The important thing to keep in mind here: the student was not Tased for refusing to remove his hat. The student was Tased because he, of his own free will, escalated the situation and assaulted a police officer. The headline for this story should instead read, "Student Tased After Assaulting a Police Officer."

                He has no one to blame but himself.
                LPGuy: Absolutely correct; however, that will not sell as many newspapers or cause public indignation so sought by some reporters. Because of the story, LE or SO is made to appear hubristic. The journalist may even win an award for the trash he presented.
                Enjoy the day,
                Bill

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by LPGuy
                  The important thing to keep in mind here: the student was not Tased for refusing to remove his hat. The student was Tased because he, of his own free will, escalated the situation and assaulted a police officer. The headline for this story should instead read, "Student Tased After Assaulting a Police Officer."

                  He has no one to blame but himself.
                  Unfortunately the video of the incident was unavailable, but if you go by what is written in the story, the officer is the one responsible for escalating the situation by trying to "grab the hat and then tried to grab the man." This situation could've ended differently depending on how the officer handled it (and remind you the video was not available for me to see so I'm going off of what was written). If the officer asked "Sir, would you mind removing your hat?" and explaining why he has asking, then the person may have complied. If the officer approached the person in a confrontational manner and said "take off the hat.." you're going to get a different response. We cannot assume with any certainty that the gentleman knew why he was being asked to remove his hat, I personally couldn't tell you what rules my city council has for its meetings. Yes, the gentleman overreacted by raising his voice, but from where I stand so did the officer.

                  I am an avid supporter of police and the work they do, but I also believe they need to be held to a certain level of accountability for their behavior, if and when that behavior plays a role in unnecessarily escalating a situation to point that force has to be used.

                  Having not seen the video, my take of the situation may be completely off, but from going by what was written, this is how I view it.
                  Last edited by EPS-CEO; 11-25-2006, 03:15 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by EPS-CEO
                    Unfortunately the video of the incident was unavailable, but if you go by what is written in the story, the officer is the one responsible for escalating the situation by trying to "grab the hat and then tried to grab the man."
                    No, you are incorrect. The man was asked to remove his hat. The man raised his voice and became unruly, according to the news report. This is disorderly conduct in a public place. The officer had every right to grab the hat and/or the subject. At this point the man would likely have been escorted out of the meeting if he was lucky. When he then tried to kick the police chief, he was now committing felony assault on a law enforcement officer.

                    Originally posted by EPS-CEO
                    This situation could've ended differently depending on how the officer handled it (and remind you the video was not available for me to see so I'm going off of what was written). If the officer asked "Sir, would you mind removing your hat?" and explaining why he has asking, then the person may have complied.
                    The news story indicates that this is exactly what happened. Regardless of the fact, how the officer asked and the tone of voice he used does not give the student a green light to disobey and assault the officer. The command was a simple one and the student was expected to follow it immediately.

                    Originally posted by EPS-CEO
                    If the officer approached the person in a confrontational manner and said "take off the hat.." you're going to get a different response. We cannot assume with any certainty that the gentleman knew why he was being asked to remove his hat, I personally couldn't tell you what rules my city council has for its meetings.
                    As I said above, how the officer asked does not make a difference. Police officers are not required to sit down with you and explain exactly why they are requesting you to do something. They are not paid to hold your hand and be warm and fuzzy with you. When issued a command by a law enforcement officer, you are expected to comply immediately. Not understanding the reason for their request is not a valid justification for disobeying.

                    Originally posted by EPS-CEO
                    I am an avid supporter of police and the work they do, but I also believe they need to be held to a certain level of accountability for their behavior, if and when that behavior plays a role in unnecessarily escalating a situation to point that force has to be used.
                    This incident happened with at least three officers, the entire city council, and probably other civilian observers present as well. I'm sure something would have been said if some huge breach of authority occurred. In fact, it says the council went right back to their meeting. The disruption was removed and business carried on as usual.

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                    • #11
                      Here is a follow up story to this situation...

                      http://abclocal.go.com/wjrt/story?se...cal&id=4757721

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                      • #12
                        The guy has a defiant tone to his comments in that latest article. I don't believe he would have complied regardless of the officer's "bedside manner."
                        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by EPS-CEO
                          Here is a follow up story to this situation...

                          http://abclocal.go.com/wjrt/story?se...cal&id=4757721
                          I see nothing in the follow-up that changes anything. The man says he didn't assault the officers in any way, shape, or form. Hard to swallow. I find it hard to believe that a police officer would use a Taser against a peaceful, compliant subject while the police chief, the county sheriff, the entire city council, and civilian bystanders stand by and watch. That sounds like a recipe for losing your job. Since I haven't heard any outrage of behalf of anyone else present at the meeting, I'm inclined to disbelieve the student's claims.

                          Further, the student shows his ignorance in the rest of his statements. Losing his rights? Discrimination? What?

                          A lot of the government proceedings or formal, professional atmospheres I can think of would have some sort of dress code. Even many schools do not allow students to wear hats. This is common sense. It doesn't take a whole lot of brain power to figure out why you are being asked to remove your hat. Even if it's just too much for you to comprehend--"ignorance of the law is no excuse."

                          The guy showed his incredible ignorance by making a big deal out of a very simple matter. I don't feel bad for him in the slightest.

                          "They just want to control us and tell us what we can or cannot do. I will not bow down and bow out and follow blindly."

                          Sorry, buddy. Dress codes are not the rumblings of government abuse of authority. In fact, they're pretty standard in many situations.

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