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Why the F*** don't people pay attention to signs?!

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Eric
    Alcohol, groups of people, men showing off in front of women, are all excuses for "missing" a sign or "forgetting" a rule. It is tragic when someone loses a life because of it.

    Love getting the Night Auditor involved comment, teamwork is a wonderful thing.
    Night Auditors are KINGs in the hotel business The new day can not start before the audit of the previous day is done & it's night work. Hotels beg Night Auditors to stay! (In small to medium hotels they are also the Night Manager)

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric
    replied
    Alcohol, groups of people, men showing off in front of women, are all excuses for "missing" a sign or "forgetting" a rule. It is tragic when someone loses a life because of it.

    Love getting the Night Auditor involved comment, teamwork is a wonderful thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • cnick001
    replied
    The best is when hospital auto doors break down and only let people out. One out of order sign on each door, one over the employee card reader, hospital wide e-mail and memo, and a big arrow board directing everyone to the other lobby. Yet still, somehow, nurses and doctors stand there looking in the doors knocking for help. We even had one Doctor outright walk into the doors.

    You'd think PHD's and med school would be indicative of common sense, but no, only of payrate.

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  • Mall Director
    replied
    Signs are for "pretty", not for reading.. Shhheeeeshh, didnt ya know? LOL!

    Its common for people to find signs apply to everyone else but themselves!

    Leave a comment:


  • flashlightcop509
    replied
    By the way in the post above you wrote that you responded with OTHER Officers. How bg is your hotel? My biggest is 500 rooms & unless we have a special group that is paying extra I work alone!
    Overnights, we have 3 Officers on duty on overlapping shifts; 1600 - 0200, 1800 - 0400, and 2000 - 0600 (my usual shift). We don't just provide coverage for the hotel, normally the Ski 1 Officer covers the hotel, and any guest service calls that occur before 1800. The Ski 2 and Ski 3 Officers cover the other properties which include the hotel, 5 base lodges, 6 condo villages, 3 wastewater treatment pump stations, 2 administration buildings, 2 vehicle maintenance shops, snowmaking ops building, and a retail outlet.

    Up until last year there were only 2 Ski Officers on duty during the night, but as hectic as it gets during the ski season, they added the 2000 - 0600 shift to provide additional manpower.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    Remember the Montreal Police interpretation of our charter of rights? We can not evict someone from their home. (And an hotel is considered a temp home).

    What I used to do in cases like this was remove the battery from the back of my walkie-talkie & tell them, "if you don't come out, it gets thrown in" LOL
    The police response was, "We're not coming in, we'll just spray you with OC till you come out."

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    Remember the Montreal Police interpretation of our charter of rights? We can not evict someone from their home. (And an hotel is considered a temp home).

    What I used to do in cases like this was remove the battery from the back of my walkie-talkie & tell them, "if you don't come out, it gets thrown in" LOL
    Tell 'em you haven't had a chance to clean the water since the Moms took their 2-year-old infants into the pool.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    I used to love it when we'd have people in the pool. I'd ask nicely. They'd be like, "Screw off, we're not getting out. What do you think of that?" I'd nicely ask if they were guests. "Yeah, so? You still aren't coming in here to bring us out."

    I'd give em five minutes to get out. After 5 minutes, the night auditor would come out, say, "We're evicting you for failing to obey our security guard's order to get out of the pool. Please leave the pool and gather your belongings from your room(s)."
    Remember the Montreal Police interpretation of our charter of rights? We can not evict someone from their home. (And an hotel is considered a temp home).

    What I used to do in cases like this was remove the battery from the back of my walkie-talkie & tell them, "if you don't come out, it gets thrown in" LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Keep in mind you can be clinically dead (no breath, no heart beat) and an AED won't go off. It only goes off under certain conditions (Sudden Cardiac Arrest.)

    They're a nice tool and all, but they won't save everyone.
    The survival rate wth just CPR = 4%

    The survival rate with CPR & AED = 40%.

    Not a large survival rate but I hope someone had an AED if I needed it!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    A Flawless Response, But.....

    Some lawyer will still try to sue. Nevertheless, your performance is worthy of recognition.

    Leave a comment:


  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Keep in mind you can be clinically dead (no breath, no heart beat) and an AED won't go off. It only goes off under certain conditions (Sudden Cardiac Arrest.)
    beat me to it. I was just going to point out that you must have a compatable rhythm to adjust before the AED will function. The name Defibrillator tells you alot. When a heart is fibrillating it's electrical signal is all mixed up causing the heart to 'quiver' instead of pump correctly. The AED basically treats a fibrillating heart the way you'd treat an old LP which was skipping on a record player. Just like when you BUMP a record palyer, making the needle skip and the record resume playing, the AED pops the hearts electrical current in an effort to get it to flow correctly. There are several electrical pulse patterns which may be present but not shockable. The absence of any rhythm also would preclude shocking.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Keep in mind you can be clinically dead (no breath, no heart beat) and an AED won't go off. It only goes off under certain conditions (Sudden Cardiac Arrest.)

    They're a nice tool and all, but they won't save everyone. And unless you've got a Zoll or Meditronic Lifepack in "12 lead" or "EMS mode," it won't tell you much about their cardiac state. (Some of those units are designed for professional EMS to just unlock and use as a manual defib. You can't get to it without the code, but its a fully working Lifepack dumbed down in "AED mode.")

    Also, people don't think signs apply to them. They're not going to get caught, and if they do, it doesn't mean much.

    I used to love it when we'd have people in the pool. I'd ask nicely. They'd be like, "Screw off, we're not getting out. What do you think of that?" I'd nicely ask if they were guests. "Yeah, so? You still aren't coming in here to bring us out."

    I'd give em five minutes to get out. After 5 minutes, the night auditor would come out, say, "We're evicting you for failing to obey our security guard's order to get out of the pool. Please leave the pool and gather your belongings from your room(s)."

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Itès crazy how guests donèt think of their safety at pools, even when not under the influence. In the past our pools were locked when the lifeguards were not on duty. Now we have installed gates around the pool themselves but leave the area unlocked after the lifeguard has gone home so guests can use the gym. We are always finding people who have jumped over the gate & gone into the pool. Downtown they even jump from the upper deck where the entrance is, into the pool 20 feet below. A Maintenance man was serious hurt a few years ago when he fell from the same area. He hit the side of the pool.

    To try & stop "after hours swimmers" I now post a sign at the entrance to the pool after the lifeguard leaves says " Danger=water treatment in progress". It helps!

    By the way in the post above you wrote that you responded with OTHER Officers. How bg is your hotel? My biggest is 500 rooms & unless we have a special group that is paying extra I work alone!

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy Taylor
    replied
    To much alcohol is never a good thing. Sorry you had such a bad night.

    Did the missing female ever turn up?

    Leave a comment:


  • Why the F*** don't people pay attention to signs?!

    Okay, slow night at work until this point... Forgive the slight rant...

    Get info from my Team Leader regarding a missing/unaccounted for guest...

    So, with the info, I go down to the last known location where she was to look for the person in question; Halfway down, I get called over the radio to respond to the hotel for a possible drowning (yep, November in Vermont) in the hotel pool... I arrive and 2 other Officers are already on scene. CPR is being administered, the phone call requesting 911 had been called; Bit of back story info at this point... There was a conference going on from what I understand for a good sized group of New England bartenders, sponsored by Anheiser-Busch, which meant open bar for the attendees... A call comes in from an ETOH person from the phone in the pool area, the night auditor suspects its a prank call but summons an Officer regardless... The Officer arrives on scene to find an intoxicated male trying to revive his equally intoxicated female aquaintance, who he had pulled out of the closed and locked up pool area after she dove in and disappeared under the pool cover for approx. 3 minutes give or take...

    I go upstairs and speak with the 911 dispatcher for an ETA of the rescue squad; Once they arrive I escort them down to the pool area where the victim is... They continue to administer CPR, check for vitals, then try to use a portable defibrillator to revive the victim who had been unconcious and unresponsive since being pulled out of the pool...

    Did I mention that by appearance of the male and under the circumstances they were both highly inebriated going by the statements given?

    The victim still had some life signs apparent, because the portable defib would not discharge when the pads were placed, so she was guerneyed and transported to the local hospital; From what I understood of the Det. Sgt. when he questioned the male who was with her, she had either expired during transport or upon arrival at the hospital...

    Anyhow, a couple of intoxicated individuals decided to completely disregard the fact that the hotel pool was closed and covered, "jumped the fence" per the males statement, and decided to go swimming in a pool that wasn't being monitored by anyone... Add the fact that it was a heated pool, and that the victim was well intoxicated IMO leads me to believe she may have simply passed out while in the pool, or became disoriented under the pool tarp, panicked, and inhaled a lungful of water...

    Regardless at this point of what actually happened (as it is still under investigation), a couple of people decided that they would disregard the rules and policies of the hotel, circumvent the safeties in place around the pool, and basically do what they wanted While in no condition to do anything more than go back to their rooms and sleep...

    The girl who drowned was only 22 years old, and based on what the State Trooper as well as my fellow Officers told me, the male that was with her changed his "story" of what happened about 4 or 5 times after the fact, so who knows...

    And BTW, the girl who drowned wasn't the missing girl we had originally been given info on...
    Last edited by flashlightcop509; 11-15-2006, 09:40 AM.

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