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In the Client's Interest: Criminal Street Gang Elimination

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  • In the Client's Interest: Criminal Street Gang Elimination

    Criminal Street Gangs are nothing new to public law enforcement, or private security. To public law enforcement, the criminal street gang is responsible for multiple serious criminal offenses, creating a network of violence and terror. From the Bloods to the MS-13, criminal street gangs carve a bloody path in their quests for territory, exclusive distribution of drugs, and domination of the areas they control.

    To the clients who hire private security companies, criminal street gangs create and maintain huge losses to the client's profitability. In apartment complexes, they lower the average occupancy rate - people move from the complex fearing street gang violence. They increase loss through tagging (placing graffiti), destruction of client property, and paying out claims to resident/visitor property which is destroyed/defaced.

    Clients hire private security companies to reduce loss. Many security companies will point to the gang problem and say, "This is a police concern." However, I am of the opinion that this is of an immediate concern for the private security company as the client suffers extreme and grevious loss from criminal street gang operations. Revenue from units is lost, management and maintenance personnel are attacked, public perception of the market value of the property is decreased, and residents who look to the client for a safe enviornment are let down - creating a litigious enviornment against the client.

    Aggressive but sane methods can be employed to curb criminal street gang activity. Security Officers, in most states, are already given the tools to protect their clients, gather intelligence on criminal street gangs operating on/near their client's properties, interrogate and remove gang members through trespass statutes, and seek the removal of resident gang members through management eviction.

    How can private security officers decrease client loss by aggressively targeting and requiring criminal street gangs to "give up" client territory, making them shift into the open streets where police have a better chance of doing detentions?

    Several methods, such as the CCBPI Program (CIS CCBPI Program Info), address the problem of criminal street gangs in high risk residential communities. In all these programs, a concerted effort is needed to Identify, Interdict, and Maintain. The company, working with the police and the client must:

    Identify the signs of criminal street gangs, their personnel, and their mission.

    Interdict the operations of criminal street gangs on or near client properties through aggressive enforcement of client rules, private property laws, and criminal laws.

    Maintain control of the property after successfully interdicting gang activity through actively patrolling, maintaining a high level of overt survelience targeted at gang activities, and enforcing quality of life rules/laws to prove to the residents the enforcement activity will "clean up" the area, and keep it clean.

    The police can be instrumental, when properly approached, in identification, interdiction, and maintenance of the gang problem. Coordination with specialized gang and drug units, developing intelligence for police, security, and client use, and sharing of information between all three is paramount.

    The client, as well, is instrumental. The police have the power to arrest, the security company has the power to remove non-residents, and the client has the power to evict residents. Any resident who uses their residence to engage in the manufacture, distribution, sale, or purchase of illegal drugs can be evicted under HUD rules in a Section 8 housing development. It violates most residential leases to associate with known drug dealers. These things, when properly documented and substantiated, can give the client the reasons they need to evict gang members from the property.

    Seeking credible, court admissible, gang training for employees who work in high risk gang areas is also useful. Through this training, the employee can write reports based on their professional training and experience which are submitted to management, documenting gang activity. These are, of course, admissible as evidence in any subsequent criminal cases against the individual to build a history of gang activity. The key, of course, is to have the training credible by law enforcement gang standards. Several gang familarization or gang investigator courses are available to the general public - to aid law enforcement in recongizing and documenting gang activity.

    I am interested in knowing how security officers recongize and identify gang activity on their properties, what damages the client sustains due to these gang activities, the methods used to interdict gang activity (and their outcome - success or failure), and the methods used to maintain client control of the property.
    Last edited by N. A. Corbier; 11-28-2005, 01:57 AM. Reason: CCPBI, CCBPI, Whatever... Edited to reflect proper acronym
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

  • #2
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    I am interested in knowing how security officers recongize and identify gang activity on their properties, what damages the client sustains due to these gang activities, the methods used to interdict gang activity (and their outcome - success or failure), and the methods used to maintain client control of the property.
    In my area, I recognize gangs by color and graffititi. Both the Nortenos and Surenos use tags with roman numerals. Nortenos sport red and Surrenos sport white. Damages range from the cost of painting over grafitti to the businesses loosing out on retail customers due to gang presence.

    First, I document everything. If a lone certified gang member sets foot on my property then I put that in my report. Even if there is no criminal offense..it still gets documented. Second, I take pictures of all certified gang members who wander the shopping center and I keep them on file for intel purposes.

    Third, all the rules that apply to any patron..apply to gang members. If a gang member is loitering and the property manager or a business owner complain, then they get kicked out as any one else.

    For Officer safety reasons, I do not approach multiple gang members. I will converse one on one..but if there is more than that..I always approach with another SO.

    ALthough the pd's patrol is not up to par..in my county there is a sophisticated multi-agency gang enforcement task force that I've found to be excellent. The task force is very professional and our company has no problems working with them.

    When interviewing a gang member always keep a distance, watch their hands, and let your post know exactly where you are and who you are dealing with. Although, not all gang member's carry guns..most carry knives. They can flip out their knife and rush you in an instant.

    Do not give a gang member an order that you can't back up. If you order him to leave and he doesn't then have him arrested no questions asked.

    Remember that they are not always the "bad guy". Last week we had a gang member buying clothes with his girlfriend. Minding his business, just him and his gf. For whatever reason a couple of military guys called him names thus instigating a hostile environement. In this case he was the victim and the the others were banned from property.

    Don't give them special treatment..but be respectful.

    Just my .02

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    • #3
      I know that I don't have nearly the experience you folks have I thought that I would chime in anyway on this thread.

      We deal alot with known "bangers" and many "busters", I helped my company implement a contact list for these individuals. Each and everytime we contact these people they get a contact card (much like PD's use) and all their information get's added to our database (which honestly I am still working on). Information collected includes but not limited to, set claimed, known associates, address, any distinguishing marks, reason for contact, and of course if any known contact included criminal charges. We just started taking digital photos of these guys if an arrest takes place and gets added to their file as well. This helped but is still a work in progress, but so far the input even fron the local PD's has been very good. If any of you more experienced folks have some more input I would appreciate it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by SeanCO
        I know that I don't have nearly the experience you folks have I thought that I would chime in anyway on this thread.

        We deal alot with known "bangers" and many "busters", I helped my company implement a contact list for these individuals. Each and everytime we contact these people they get a contact card (much like PD's use) and all their information get's added to our database (which honestly I am still working on). Information collected includes but not limited to, set claimed, known associates, address, any distinguishing marks, reason for contact, and of course if any known contact included criminal charges. We just started taking digital photos of these guys if an arrest takes place and gets added to their file as well. This helped but is still a work in progress, but so far the input even fron the local PD's has been very good. If any of you more experienced folks have some more input I would appreciate it.
        This is outstanding, and more than alot of companies do to address chronic property offenders. I want input from everyone on this, quite frankly, because with the more people chiming in, the more we see what's working and what's not.

        Does your company contact and maintain relations with the street officers and gang units?
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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        • #5
          That's interesting, I hadn't thought about that. In Florida, when you were in a public place - you had no expectation of privacy, nor did your minor children. The only thing we had to be careful of was pointing the video cameras into units accidently, as that would be an invasion of privacy.

          If you were in a public area, even if it was private property, you had zero expectation of privacy. None.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

          Comment


          • #6
            Well i work at a mall in a not so great area. We try to maintain a high level of security there. We are known for having few problems relative to the area around us. We are a proactive group. We do have our regular mall rats and then the gangs. For my safety i never approach a group of people with out first notifing dispatch and getting a cover unit started. I would rather start them and cancel them then need to start them in the middle of a problem. I work exterior most of the time and the other officers who i am normally assigned with are good about starting for cover with out requesting. Any time i hear an officer go out with a group i respond to them wether or not asked, If they are interior i start towards the closest door. We really dont have too many gang related incidents here because it has become known that 1. Most of our officers are LE or Military. 2. We have a good relation ship with the local PD. 3. We have direct lines to LEO's in the area. I also FI Most contacts i make (like PD) they are then entered into a system. Many other officers do the same. We also keep logs of photos of people we have arrested in the office.
            Robert
            Here endith the lesson

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            • #7
              Criminal street gang elimination works with a proactive approach..that seems to be the consensus here.

              It certainly works in my area. Drug dealing has gone way down. Now and then I encounter a random wannabe buster selling by himself. However the gang presence is way down. They know that we have a proactive approach so they tend to go elsewhere for there criminal activities.

              Comment


              • #8
                My experience with gangs in apartment communities has been one of caution. The security working those places usually works alone or with limited reinforcements available. Be aware of who you are speaking to. If there are too many in one group it may the best idea to wait for your cover to arrive before approaching. Always stress respect when speaking to these folks. Knowing how to talk to people the right way is paramount to success here. Act like billy-badass and you'll get killed, quickly. Enforce the curfew rules and property regs if you have them. Write up violations thoroughly and impartially. Usually if there's a lot of non-resident traffic in the complex, that indicates a drug house or a gang house. Work on getting that problem apartment evicted. In some places cooperation with the local pd is tremendous. Take advantage of that if it is. In any case, choose your battles carefully.
                "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Wow thanks guys for the positive feedback on my contact list! I am actually working with the local PD and gang unit in regards to some of our more "known" offenders, and they have been very helpful in working out the kinks in my system. The hardest thing for us to overcome is getting the one property where we have the most problems to actually evict the troublemakers. But when we continually contact certain individuals, or arrests are made they get a full report with pics and everything. And they are starting to come around, slowly but surely. As for the legallity of taking pics we are the same here in Colorado as some of the others said, you have no expectency of privacy in public. And where criminal charges or even a trespass is concerned we always take pics of the offenders.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Instant rewind: I posted in this forum about the time I had to roll to a situation to pull a fellow officer out of a jam, and made a big show of coming out of my car with a shotgun, ending the situation right there.

                    Dumb cluck was working at a conveinence store, where about 15-20 "Crips" were going to have it out with about 15-20 "Vice Lords." Most of the so called gangs in this city are really no more trouble than a fly on a horse's butt, but they can still be dangerous in large numbers. Dumb cluck got forced against a wall; he had the last shred of sense to just key up his radio. Didn't take long to figure out who it was, and all patrol units responded right away. Idiot thought he was going to talk them down himself.
                    Mopes all scattered for the hills, and dumb cluck got a 9.2 Richter scale chewing out from your's truly; I had just told him a few nights earlier about how, contrary to what that conceited idiot thought, those gang bangers all thought he was a joke, and that he was going to get himself into some serious trouble if he didn't watch out, and that it would most likely be me to pull his ass out of a jam!

                    Word was put out, and all gangs suprisingly complied with an agreement that that store property was hot; no gang controlled it, and any who thought of trying otherwise would be dealt with severely.

                    Not long after, city PD formed an anti-gang unit similar to CRASH of the LAPD, and they kept the gangs on the run a lot, so we didn't have too much trouble with them after that.
                    Never make a drummer mad; we beat things for a living!

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                    • #11
                      DMS 525:
                      Do you have at hand "The Ten Commandments of Security/Law Enforcement"
                      aka "Ten Deadly Sins?"
                      Forgot on which of these topics/threads I posted them.
                      You did a good job in letting him know he just violated Sin #2, Tombstone Courage.
                      Enjoy the day,
                      Bill

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