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Calling in License Plates?

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  • LPGuy
    replied
    This reminds me of a situation in which my manager and I apprehended two male juvenile subjects for shoplifting. They both appeared to only be 11 or 12 years old, and we didn't handcuff either one of them. However, I'm always very observant of a subject's hands if they are not handcuffed. One subject in particular attempted to reach into his pockets even after I had warned him to keep them folded together in front of him. When I warned him, I told him I would handcuff him if he started fidgeting again. My manager gave me the "don't worry about it, he's just a kid" look.

    When we arrived in the office and performed a cursory search for weapons, to my manager's surprise, the subject in question had a very large knife on him. After that, he understood my concern for safety, regardless of who the subject is.

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  • LPGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTjon
    At my site, there are a few officers, including myself, that will let dispatch know when we are out of our vehicle investigating a suspicious vehicle. We will call in our location and the vehicle license plate.

    I've had officers ridicule me for doing this, saying that I'm being a cop wanna-be. I see it as a safety measure, as some of our properties are gated, but others are open to anyone.

    Does anyone else do this?
    If I did patrol/vehicle patrol, you're darn right I'd do the same. Remember that your safety and the safety of your fellow officers is always your number one priority. Develope good safety habits and it could save your life someday.

    If you only practice good safety habits situationally, you're going to get blindsided by the unexpected.

    Leave a comment:

  • Mr. Security
    Senior Member

  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Read my Proverbs signature and BTW, keep on doing it.

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  • Arrowslinger
    Member

  • Arrowslinger
    replied
    Pay it no mind and keep performing your duties the RIGHT way, I had a few officers when I did mall security that felt the same way. Until you fully explain details as just what may happen when a person lunges from a vehicle with a weapon. When I left we had it down pat, from “lighting them up” to the proper approach, and no one ever went up to a vehicle unless one of our cameras had a great view of the vehicle AND officer.

    The industrial setting I am at now gets an updated CD-ROM from the DMV; with this, we have the ability to know if the vehicle is registered to an employee. If not 97% of the time a lookup of the owners name and a phone call gives us the information we need. I have also implemented the procedure here on vehicle approach, although a very different place than a public mall, my officer’s safety comes first.

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  • 1stWatch
    Member

  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTjon
    At my site, there are a few officers, including myself, that will let dispatch know when we are out of our vehicle investigating a suspicious vehicle. We will call in our location and the vehicle license plate.

    I've had officers ridicule me for doing this, saying that I'm being a cop wanna-be. I see it as a safety measure, as some of our properties are gated, but others are open to anyone.

    Does anyone else do this?
    We are required to do that anytime we approach a vehicle. Ridicule comes from a few, but they're usually dispatchers who have no other experience and have never worked in the field. I think everybody else here understands the purpose of the policy.

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • jimmyhat
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by EMTjon
    At my site, there are a few officers, including myself, that will let dispatch know when we are out of our vehicle investigating a suspicious vehicle. We will call in our location and the vehicle license plate.

    I've had officers ridicule me for doing this, saying that I'm being a cop wanna-be. I see it as a safety measure, as some of our properties are gated, but others are open to anyone.

    Does anyone else do this?
    Do it all the time, and I think what you're doing is a good defensive tactic.

    When working by myself, before approaching a vehicle I'll right down the tag, make/model, date/time and location. I leave that in an obvious location, like the dashboard of my vehicle. If things go bad at least the follow-up Troops will have a direction to go in.

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  • Mall Director
    Member

  • Mall Director
    replied
    Ooooooo.. I want one of those! Its like ani-theft for my Officers!!!

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  • HotelSecurity
    Senior Member

  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTjon
    Duress Code? What is that?

    I understand what you are referring to, but could someone either post or PM me an example or two?
    Montreal police use 10-07, Officer in trouble.
    They have a button on their walkie-talkies & on their car computers that transmit at 10-37, same thing as a 10-7. When the 10-37 goes off they have a special phrase to answer If they don't answer it correctly it is assumed they are in trouble. In either case they must stay where they are until another patrol car comes to check on them.

    The security in the métro have a mercury swith inside their walkie-talkies. If they fall down, the walkie-talkie automatically sends out a duress code.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    Senior Member

  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    A duress code can be any predetermined code or wording that indicates without giving the enemy understanding that you are in trouble and need immediate support and assistance.

    First, most of the other guards that ridicule you for this may not be used to actually having radios, or they do not understand what the function and purpose of a radio is. Find someone you can trust to acknowledge the information you give on a stop, because I guarantee you that the others are not listening.

    "So, Jon was killed tonight. The state police want to know if any of you heard the plate he said."

    Response #1: "No, I don't really pay attention to the radio unless I need it, its not really useful to me."

    Response #2: "Jon was always a wanna-be cop..." ... ask again to answer the question... "I'm sorry. No, I did not remember what plate number he said, no."

    I've met many people who think the radio is there for two reasons: 1. To let them talk on it when they want to, usually to go, "Get back to the guard booth so I can take a leak," and 2. "That's so the client can call us and tell us to go fix maintenance problems, not for our use."

    A fixed post I was on with a WBS company actually was issued a police radio, given a police call sign, and the radio was kept off at all times. When I asked management, the management replied, "Security guards should not be having police radios. Its only there because its part of the contract. You're not the police, don't use it, call 911."

    When the airport police found out what happened to their radio, they simply took it away and we lost all contact with them.

    Leave a comment:

  • Mall Director
    Member

  • Mall Director
    replied
    Safety Safety Safety

    Duress code, on a national standard is 10-33. Calling in that you are clear and Ok, is Code 4.

    PS: My response to your fellow "commrads" ridiculing you.. You will see them at their funeral! It's a crazy world out there now days. Older security personnel, that havent had the benefit of good training, or think they know better since they have been doing this work for so long, tend on an occassion to say "are you trying to be a cop?", not realizing the safety factor.

    All of my staff use safety protocol when getting out to make contact:
    - Before getting out, call in location, reason, plates and vehicle descript.
    - approach from subject cars blind spot, at night, light em up to prevent watching,
    - Touch, not drag fingers across trunk lid.
    - Stay out of direct sight of the contact subject

    If you call out contact reason, ie: suspicious vehicle, suspicious subject, generally a second unit is already rolling to location for assistance. I know some like to use a specific code for the location of contact, I highly suggest to my staff that its not overly necessary. Reason: If you are on the edge or have a bad vibe, you tend to get info mixed up if adrenaline is flowing. You dont want to give out a bad location, then have something go wrong. You need to be as descriptive as possible. More info you get out before contact will increase your chances of survival. Yes, others may have scanners and listen in, and its a chance you take, but its better to be clear and concise with your "10-20" than to be wrong. If someone is listening in, and decides to join the party, report in immediately when another unidentified vehicle arrives or comes by. If nothing happens, you will be relieved, but after getting done with your first contact, finish up, and locate that passerby and make contact. Catch em, and let it known you noticed them "rubber necking" as they appeared during a safety contact. Likely, if they have a scanner, you may see it, if not, no worries, you have made it known that if anyone shows up after listening in, they will get contacted. Make things very unpleasant and uncomfortable for those that want to stick their noses in where it doesnt belong. Likely, the word will get out that its not a fun thing to do.

    Dont trade your values in over some air head ridiculing you over your procedures. You will live longer then them, and thats all that matters!

    Leave a comment:


  • EMTjon
    replied
    Duress Code? What is that?

    I understand what you are referring to, but could someone either post or PM me an example or two?

    Leave a comment:

  • Bill Warnock
    Senior Member

  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTjon
    At my site, there are a few officers, including myself, that will let dispatch know when we are out of our vehicle investigating a suspicious vehicle. We will call in our location and the vehicle license plate.

    I've had officers ridicule me for doing this, saying that I'm being a cop wanna-be. I see it as a safety measure, as some of our properties are gated, but others are open to anyone.

    Does anyone else do this?
    EMTjon:
    It sounds like the officers are disfunctional, delusional or just plain stupid. May I assume these Einstein want-to-be's have never heard of the "Ten Deadly Sins" or "Ten Commandments of Security and Law Enforcement?" Anytime you leave your vehicle for any reason, common sense and experience dictates you notify someone.
    If you are out of your vehicle and have a hand-held radio, you may get a chance to pass the duress code to let someone know you need assistance.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric
    replied
    Yes, it depended on the area / time. It is a good follow up method.
    Can you get Management to impliment it as procedure for all?

    Would a code be needed when using the radio in case of scanner use, you do not want to broadcast your location.

    Leave a comment:


  • EMTjon
    started a topic Calling in License Plates?

    Calling in License Plates?

    At my site, there are a few officers, including myself, that will let dispatch know when we are out of our vehicle investigating a suspicious vehicle. We will call in our location and the vehicle license plate.

    I've had officers ridicule me for doing this, saying that I'm being a cop wanna-be. I see it as a safety measure, as some of our properties are gated, but others are open to anyone.

    Does anyone else do this?

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