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  • #16
    Originally posted by LPGuy
    Is this based on statistics? Or just assumptions? I'm not disputing the fact that officers occasionally get into a accidents when going code, but the statement that it's "usually" a mistake on their part.



    Again, this is an assumption on your part. I don't know of very many officers "in their early twenties" (in fact, many local police departments in my area prefer candidates in their mid- to late-20s). Irregardless of age, all officers go through EVOC training while in the police academy, which in my opinion, makes them better drivers that most everyone else out on the road. Most citizens don't gain driving experience "over time" that prepares them to drive in excess of the speed limit and perform vehicle pursuits.

    I would guess that the majority of officer-caused accidents are not caused by lack of driving experience, as you suggest, but instead based upon the number of things an officer is trying to do while driving code. Case in point: An officer friend of mine was involved in a nighttime vehicle pursuit while it was snowing on the highway. With his left hand, the officer was trying to use his spotlight to read the vehicle's plate, and with his right hand, he was holding his radio mic and trying to read it off to dispatch. It then dawned on him that he was driving 90 MPH and holding the steering wheel with his knee.

    He decided to wait on the plate and just focus on getting the vehicle stopped after that.
    I've been following the fatal vehicle accidents involving police officers on the ODMP for some time. Too many times the narrative says that "the vehicle left the roadway" when responding. That means that the vehicle was not driven in a controlled manner. Also, I've been on 4 ride-alongs and have personally witnessed reckless driving. Regardless of how much training a police officer receives, only time and experience improve the wisdom and judgment needed to minimize the risk involved in driving fast.

    That's why many departments want a supervisor to decide when to continue a pursuit, and in my area, when they can use a code response.
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Mr. Security
      I've been following the fatal vehicle accidents involving police officers on the ODMP for some time. Too many times the narrative says that "the vehicle left the roadway" when responding. That means that the vehicle was not driven in a controlled manner. Also, I've been on 4 ride-alongs and have personally witnessed reckless driving. Regardless of how much training a police officer receives, only time and experience improve the wisdom and judgment needed to minimize the risk involved in driving fast.

      That's why many departments want a supervisor to decide when to continue a pursuit, and in my area, when they can use a code response.
      Fast car, flashing lights, siren blaring, adrenaline kicks in and sometimes adrenaline is not a good thing. It sometimes fogs good judgment and common sense. It has been my experience that this happens more with young officers that the “seasoned vet.” I have been at both ends.
      Last edited by T202; 11-12-2006, 08:35 PM.

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