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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by bigshotceo
    Concerning the program I was referring to: The Criminal Code says that we must "deliver" them to a peace officer. My guess is that the police stretched the term "deliver" to mean "present the suspect over the phone" ie have the sgt. talk to the arrestee over the phone. My guess is that no one's challenged it because it's not really against the fundamental principles of the law (the police are informed of the arrest, and can determine if it's valid, etc..) really convenient and no one loses (because it's very likely the arrestee will be in a lot less trouble than if the police physically showed up.
    I'd still be worried & would check with a lawyer. Some smart a*s lawyer could make something of this, claiming false arrest because the suspect was not "delivered" to a peace officer.

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  • bigshotceo
    replied
    Concerning the program I was referring to: The Criminal Code says that we must "deliver" them to a peace officer. My guess is that the police stretched the term "deliver" to mean "present the suspect over the phone" ie have the sgt. talk to the arrestee over the phone. My guess is that no one's challenged it because it's not really against the fundamental principles of the law (the police are informed of the arrest, and can determine if it's valid, etc..) really convenient and no one loses (because it's very likely the arrestee will be in a lot less trouble than if the police physically showed up.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by K-9 Aussie
    Over here down under in New South Wales, we can make an arrest under section 100 (sect 99 for Police) of the Law Enforcement Act (Powers and responsibilites) of 2002. This replaces our old section 352 for making arrests. When security officers over here make an arrest, we are executing this with the same, and no more power than an ordinary citizens arrest. Section 231 enables use to use resonable force to make that arrest.

    However subsection 2 of section 100 states we must hand the offender over to Police as soon as possible for them to be dealt with according to law. We use to be abe to take the offender before the courts ourselves etc but that's now all changed, which is a good thing because now if you arrest someone the Police must deal with them where as before if the Police didn't want to YOU had to do it which meant you had to make sure they were safe in custody etc and would cost you thousands.

    We can use handcuffs on the offender, however we must have completed to N.S.W. Police Commissioners approved course in handcuffing. Then also we can only handcuff in serious situations such as a bag snatch, serious assault. It's not like the U.S.A. where you slap the cuffs on straight away when you arrest someone.

    Only problem we have is that we make the arrest, but Police refuse to recognise that and claim our arrest power is nothing as it's only a citizens arrest. So many times I've arrested someone from being armed to serious assaults, and they take all the credit.
    Canada's law are very similar. And I can relate to your last sentence. In my 30+ years in security (last week was my 25 with the same company, I had worked other places ) I have made about 20 arrests but I don't think that the police or even the courts acknowledged this. Whenever I would turn someone over to the police they always re-arrest them.

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  • K-9 Aussie
    replied
    Over here down under in New South Wales, we can make an arrest under section 100 (sect 99 for Police) of the Law Enforcement Act (Powers and responsibilites) of 2002. This replaces our old section 352 for making arrests. When security officers over here make an arrest, we are executing this with the same, and no more power than an ordinary citizens arrest. Section 231 enables use to use resonable force to make that arrest.

    However subsection 2 of section 100 states we must hand the offender over to Police as soon as possible for them to be dealt with according to law. We use to be abe to take the offender before the courts ourselves etc but that's now all changed, which is a good thing because now if you arrest someone the Police must deal with them where as before if the Police didn't want to YOU had to do it which meant you had to make sure they were safe in custody etc and would cost you thousands.

    We can use handcuffs on the offender, however we must have completed to N.S.W. Police Commissioners approved course in handcuffing. Then also we can only handcuff in serious situations such as a bag snatch, serious assault. It's not like the U.S.A. where you slap the cuffs on straight away when you arrest someone.

    Only problem we have is that we make the arrest, but Police refuse to recognise that and claim our arrest power is nothing as it's only a citizens arrest. So many times I've arrested someone from being armed to serious assaults, and they take all the credit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Andy Taylor
    Yeah, those were the good ole' days, huh, Barn?

    Seriously though, regardless of which agency makes the arrest, they get transported downtown to the Sheriff's Main Jail. If it is Sac PD, they sometimes have a big old fashioned Paddy wagon (I think that is maily used for drunks) and sometimes the arresting officer does the transport. any other agency in the county is the arresting officers. the only exception to this is Folsom PD who run their own jail.
    Didn't realize you were here 'Ange.' Welcome.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Defensive tactics
    Your comment about the minor pecked my curiosity, Under Criminal code of Canada we can not release a minor we MUST call the police to come and "attend" to the suspect

    stay safe
    Ben Wallace
    The way I read the Crimnal Code you MUST turn ANYONE you arrest over to the police,

    Neil

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy Taylor
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    I prefer the way Andy and I did it. You know, like when Otis checked into the local jail, had a good night's sleep, and then a hearty breakfast from Aunt Bee. After that, he lets himself out and that's it here in Mayberry.
    Yeah, those were the good ole' days, huh, Barn?

    Seriously though, regardless of which agency makes the arrest, they get transported downtown to the Sheriff's Main Jail. If it is Sac PD, they sometimes have a big old fashioned Paddy wagon (I think that is maily used for drunks) and sometimes the arresting officer does the transport. any other agency in the county is the arresting officers. the only exception to this is Folsom PD who run their own jail.

    Leave a comment:


  • Defensive tactics
    replied
    bigshotceo
    The protocal you are refering to is called shop theft protocal, It is rarelly actually used in LP (at least the stores in Ottawa I did) because the criteria are so strict

    1. Only applies to theft under
    2. Only 1 suspect
    3. Co operative/no resist arrest
    4. Not under the influince
    5. Over 18
    6. No priors

    Your comment about the minor pecked my curiosity, Under Criminal code of Canada we can not release a minor we MUST call the police to come and "attend" to the suspect

    stay safe
    Ben Wallace

    Leave a comment:


  • Charger
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    In Pinellas County, Florida, a police officer generally makes a physical arrest, puts himself out on the arrest, and transports the person to the 49th Street Jail, even if they are 10 miles away in Tarpon Springs. Other units take over that person's assigned area while he's transporting his prisoner.

    Unless, of course, they need to question the person beyond a field interview, then he goes to the police station and is interrogated there for a few hours. All LEOs must remand their prisoner over to the Sheriff for booking, though.
    That's pretty much the way it works around here as well... LEO makes arrest, transports either to local PD station, or county jail depending on whether or not he has further interrogation to do... Other units cover his area while he transports.. (Fortunately, this isn't a terribly large town, so transport generally takes only a few minutes... booking takes a bit longer, of course)

    The exception to the rule, of course, is the K-9 Officers... Since there's no room in the back for a prisoner they have to call another unit in for the transport... (Although personally, I think it would be quite comical to throw a perp in the dog's cage for a few, just to see him squirm... )

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    In Pinellas County, Florida, a police officer generally makes a physical arrest, puts himself out on the arrest, and transports the person to the 49th Street Jail, even if they are 10 miles away in Tarpon Springs. Other units take over that person's assigned area while he's transporting his prisoner.

    Unless, of course, they need to question the person beyond a field interview, then he goes to the police station and is interrogated there for a few hours. All LEOs must remand their prisoner over to the Sheriff for booking, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mall Director
    replied
    Shhhh.. Dont tell our PD, they would like it! LOL!

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  • bigshotceo
    replied
    I've heard of a program in Ottawa between stores and the police whereby if an LP arrests someone for shoplifting and certain conditions are met (I think it's 1st offense, compliant arrestee and the individual is a minor) the LP can speak to a Police Staff Sgt. over the phone, give them the pertinent details and the Staff Sgt. verbally authorizes the release of the individual. Works great, as no officer actually has to attend.

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  • Mall Director
    replied
    LOL.. typically...

    If any of my staff conduct an arrest, I feel for the poor fellow (in a way, shhh) as its is a long process. The time spent on one arrest takes forever.

    We bring them into our control facility, where they sit and relax, watching us paperwork ourselves to death. Anywhere from a half hour to even a couple hours (friday+saturday nights), then PD shows up and takes custody of them. This part, the subject sits in the back of the PD units car, while the PD officer and us play paperwork exchange for another 20 minutes or so. The subject is then taken to the PD, where they spend another 3-6 hours while the PD officer does his/her reports and documentation. While this is being done, the subject sits in one of there tiny holding cells. When the PD officer is done, then they take the subject on a fun ride to another town where the correctional facility is, and the subject is then turned over to the sheriff's department, where they are inprocessed. From what I hear, the inprocessing can take a half day easily, where the subject goes from one tiny holding cell to another, until finally dropped in to a "pod". God forbid any one is ever arrested on a friday.. they have all weekend before having a bond set for release on a Monday, if they are lucky.

    I sit and watch these poor subjects (lol) because I just know they are in for the most boring time ahead of them.

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  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Originally posted by histfan71

    While working at the college, we did not have a cell to put arrestees in. We had to transport our bad guys directly to the county jail and book them there. The county jail was about 30 miles away from the college. While we usually had 2-3 cops working per shift, once in a while only one cop would be working. If the lone officer had to book someone, the college would be uncovered for the time he was gone, but fortunately this never did happen.

    .
    Just about how it happens at my college. During day or evening shift, we usually have enough guys on that if we need to take someone to jail, we can. But sometimes we might only have 1 officer on duty, in that case either a supervisor has to come in and baby sit the campus, or we have to call Dallas PD (per our interagency agreement, they'll transport for us in an emergency, but I have yet to meet a Dallas Officer who who actually liked doing it lol, I wouldn't either matter of fact).

    The powers that be have been talkling about a "2 officers per shift, 24/7/365" minimum, but we know it'll never happen.....

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Both here and back home we had to transport anyone we arrested ourselves. At LAPD we had our own holding cells in the station we booked anyone into. If the arrestee were going to be held longer than about 4 hours or so, the arrestee would need to be sent to Jail Division at the police headquarters. Usually, a van from Jail Division would be sent to pick the guy up.

    While working at the college, we did not have a cell to put arrestees in. We had to transport our bad guys directly to the county jail and book them there. The county jail was about 30 miles away from the college. While we usually had 2-3 cops working per shift, once in a while only one cop would be working. If the lone officer had to book someone, the college would be uncovered for the time he was gone, but fortunately this never did happen.

    Here on Kwaj we have two jail cells in the police station. The vast majority of people we arrest and held for about two hours or so while we process them, then they are released on their own recognizance until their hearing. Since I have been here, there have been two arrests for serious felonies. One was a child molestation case and the other involving hacking into a government computer system. Both those guys got to sit in our cells for a couple of days until the Army's Criminal Investigation Division could come and pick them up.

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