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  • Favorite coffee

    A lot of folks in uniform tirelessly drink copious amounts of coffee. If you are one of these people, what is your favorite kind? Are you allowed coffee breaks on your job?

    For me, three words come to mind right now: spiced pumpkin latte.
    "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

  • #2
    We had "working lunches," in other words, find food when you were working. I've even heard that when your thirsty or hungry, patrol a bit, and then include the vending machine on your patrol - nobody's going to detect a pattern of when your hungry or thirsty in your regular patrol schedule, it keeps it very random indeed.

    I rather like Starbucks Mint Mocha Frappachino, and for hot coffee, I like the flavored millstone coffees. Your coffee interests me, as well. I usually would bring, and drink, instant cappachino mixed with hot chocolate, in a 25 percent hot chocolate, 75 percent cappachino blend to a static site if I were there for more than a week. On road, 7-11 was awesome. Non Junk Food (Sandwiches) flavored coffees, cheap.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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    • #3
      I like to treat myself to a "Starbucks" White Chocolate Frappachino, or maybe a cappachino, at any rate ones hot and ones cold, and boy are they tasty. Then I'll order a pastry, like a cheese danish, and buy a newspaper. This is probably my favorite way to start off the day, assuming I have time to enjoy it all. Unfortunately it can also get expensive, so most days I'll just drink the coffee at the site I'm at, loaded up with cream and sugar, and maybe add some hot chocolate mix.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 1stWatch
        A lot of folks in uniform tirelessly drink copious amounts of coffee. If you are one of these people, what is your favorite kind? Are you allowed coffee breaks on your job?
        Yes, I drink lots of Coffee, probably too much. On a Static Guard Post, we don't have Coffee Breaks, we just have a brew going 24/7. It's no wonder I can't sleep.

        Maybe I should switch to Tea, say Tetley's Irish Breakfast?

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        • #5
          Dunkin Donuts coffee for me. It's the only inexpensive coffee that doesn't have a bitter after-taste. Love it, love it, love it!

          PS - We can take a coffee break anytime we want. Whatever it takes to remain sharp and alert.
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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          • #6
            I like Pete's Coffee..I like mochas with a shot of Irish cream.

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            • #7
              Community Coffee Medium roast.
              Hospital Security Officer

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              • #8
                I love how 7 Eleven hands out free coffee to anybody in a uniform here
                "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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                • #9
                  I dont like coffee but i have had a capichino once in a while when im pretty tired. That costs like a dollar 12 lol.

                  Now not trying to cause anything but on the msg board we should discuss many issues that surround us as S/O's. In my comp rules we have a policy that you should not take a discount or anything free if they offer it to u etc. I dont think this is right. I mean I can see if its big money value. But a 50 cent or so cup of coffee or pop if they wanna give free is fine with me. I mean think about it. When you are at a gas station if you see something goin on u can call it in. I go to the same gas station every night for the rest room and a drink. So i know the clerks they know me. I even know some of the reg customers. And i have had the chance to scare away a susp customer. They keep doggin me and the clerk watchin us just sitting in the lot. It was makin the female clerk nervous so when i walked out of the store i acted like i had use my cell phone. They left in a hurry. So i say why not give us a free drink once in a while LOL. What do u all think on it ?

                  Stay Safe All
                  Ok now it is offical bed time for me lol.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by S/O245
                    I dont like coffee but i have had a capichino once in a while when im pretty tired. That costs like a dollar 12 lol.

                    Now not trying to cause anything but on the msg board we should discuss many issues that surround us as S/O's. In my comp rules we have a policy that you should not take a discount or anything free if they offer it to u etc. I dont think this is right. I mean I can see if its big money value. But a 50 cent or so cup of coffee or pop if they wanna give free is fine with me. I mean think about it. When you are at a gas station if you see something goin on u can call it in. I go to the same gas station every night for the rest room and a drink. So i know the clerks they know me. I even know some of the reg customers. And i have had the chance to scare away a susp customer. They keep doggin me and the clerk watchin us just sitting in the lot. It was makin the female clerk nervous so when i walked out of the store i acted like i had use my cell phone. They left in a hurry. So i say why not give us a free drink once in a while LOL. What do u all think on it ?

                    Stay Safe All
                    Ok now it is offical bed time for me lol.
                    The issue stems from "bribery," which doesn't technically apply, as you cannot bribe a private citizen - they have no official office to influence. This is yet another concept borrowed from public law enforcement.

                    However, on the other side of the coin, there are the twin evils of public perception and expectation of favors by the compensator. First, the public generally gets pissy when they find out a uniform gets free "something." Most chock it up to them being police, and it either being a "necessary evil," or some sort of crime prevention thing - or they don't care. When citizens who DO care that the police get free things find out that the uniform recieving free items is NOT a sworn police officer, they get even more pissy - after all, they're just a security guard. They will usually go on and on about bribery, etc.

                    The realistic side is much more dangerous, however. This is expectation of favors or other compensation by the person giving free food. From a logistical standpoint, your standing there in uniform at 7-11 is providing security services to a client we don't have. In other words, your giving out free protection. The company is paying for your liability insurance in case something bad happens to you while your "off your property," or "out of your patrol vehicle," and they don't like the idea. If your getting free stuff, your staying longer, making the company - I mean you - a target.

                    Eventually, 7-11 argues that your employee was giving out de facto protective services, at specific times, and they failed to perform those de facto protective services, and the place got Xed. I don't know if anyone's won a cupability suit based on that argument, but its bandied about as one reason why you don't.

                    From another standpoint, if your recieving compensation from the employees of the client, they may expect the employee to be derelict in his duties, and use the threat of "bribery" as a leverage in their expectations.

                    HOWEVER, unless you have a specific public office, such as Police Officer, you cannot be bribed under most statutes. It comes back to "the public gets pissy, your providing free services, we're paying the bill if your hurt playing cop at the donut shoppe, and the employees feeding you free soda expect you to remain silent about the hooker they bought."
                    Some Kind of Commando Leader

                    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                    • #11
                      Actually the bribery statute would not apply here, at least in this state, since it defines "gift to public servant" as "being on account of such employment". A security officer is considered a "public servant" in Texas now that the Department of Public Safety assumed regulation, licensing, and enforcement of private security in 2003 and the penal code refers to "public servant" as "one who performs a governmental function."
                      The stores I have gone to that decide to give out coffee do so for pretty much any worker in a uniform, including road crew and emt's. Whether they are supposed to according to store policy, I wouldn't really know.
                      "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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                      • #12
                        Its cool of a store who wants to do that. I see no problem in it at all. Unless a Officer is taking advantage of such offerings then i would find a problem a little with that. Ohio has done the same thing with Security Officers and Private Investigators. We use to be under the Dept of Commerce somethin like that. Then after 9/11 they moved security and investigators to ohio homeland security. We are licensed under the Ohio Dept of Public Safety. From what i hear and read on the site it seems like they are trying to change Security in Ohio for the better. They are working on better training and making it more easy to run background checks etc. And many other things.

                        When i was a Police Explorer we had the same rule in our policy rules and regs that said you can use badge uniform etc or anything else to obtain something free or a discount. But on duty when we rode with a PO once in a while the store gave us a free pop etc. I think if a place wants to do this for you on duty its all fine. I dont think anyone should obtain a discount or free thing off duty by using you badge etc. Unless the people know you and want to give it free.

                        Stay Safe All

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                          When citizens who DO care that the police get free things find out that the uniform recieving free items is NOT a sworn police officer, they get even more pissy - after all, they're just a security guard. They will usually go on and on about bribery, etc.
                          I think it's fine for the police to get free coffee and discounts at restaurants. Their presence at these establishments is good for the business and bad for the 'crooks.' As a S/O, I do not accept free or discounted coffee. I am careful to make sure that I am charged the regular price because I have been offered discounted coffee on a couple of occasions. After all, I am still a private citizen.

                          N.A. Corbier's remarks about the liability issue should make any S/O think twice about accepting free food/drink or anything else.
                          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 1stWatch
                            A security officer is considered a "public servant" in Texas now that the Department of Public Safety assumed regulation, licensing, and enforcement of private security in 2003 and the penal code refers to "public servant" as "one who performs a governmental function."
                            Are you certain that a S/O is performing a "governmental function?" How can that be if your client is in the private sector?
                            Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mr. Security
                              Are you certain that a S/O is performing a "governmental function?" How can that be if your client is in the private sector?
                              Texas is orientating their Commissioned State Security Officer program towards limited peace officer status. Its already a felony to batter or assault a Commissioned State Security Officer in uniform, or displaying a badge and clothing plainly marked "SECURITY" on it. The state subcommittees are already pushing limited police powers for CSSOs through the legislature.

                              This is one of the states that believes in public regulation of all private policing functions, including giving public authority to demand public responsibility.
                              Some Kind of Commando Leader

                              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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