Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Securi-Maintenance

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Charger
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    So if someone vomits on the floor & since I am a SECURITY OFFICER who is not allowed to mop it up & someone slips on the vomit, hurts themselves & sues the hotel for negligence, this is ok? Not in my hotels. Our job is to prevent loss to the hotel. Getting sued is a loss. And remember in 2 of my 3 hotels there is only the Night Auditor & Security on duty overnight.
    Had this scenario happen a lot when I worked in a mall... Security's job when the vomit happened?: Grab a nearby 'wet floor' cone to mark it off, notify janitorial, and stand by in the area until they arrived to clean it up. Security should NOT be doing the mop-up themselves.

    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    Or the toilet gets blocked. There is a family with kids in the room. What do they do? Use the bathtub? They won't come back. Another loss for the hotel.
    Again, call someone from housekeeping/maintenance. Unless this is a little 10-room ratshack motel, someone from one of those departments should be on duty at all hours. Security should NOT be doing this stuff.

    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    An hotel is part of the SERVICE industry. We have to do extras.
    So is Law Enforcement... But you don't see them responding to calls to unclog toilets, now do you?

    I'm not trying to be a jerk, and I apologize if I came across as kinda brash... I just woke up.. I just think it's ridiculous that companies expect security to do this kind of stuff, and that some SOs are actually OK with it...

    Leave a comment:


  • cnick001
    replied
    A campground is just an outdoor hotel, however I do have to agree that painting is extreme. For the guardbooth, I was happy to do it just to improve my workplace and maintain a more professional appearence.

    Time to look for a new job.

    Oh, and further, I'm privately employed by the facility, no contact to fall back on. (hence why the boss can order me to paint on a slow night)

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    So if someone vomits on the floor & since I am a SECURITY OFFICER who is not allowed to mop it up & someone slips on the vomit, hurts themselves & sues the hotel for negligence, this is ok? Not in my hotels. Our job is to prevent loss to the hotel. Getting sued is a loss. And remember in 2 of my 3 hotels there is only the Night Auditor & Security on duty overnight.

    Or the toilet gets blocked. There is a family with kids in the room. What do they do? Use the bathtub? They won't come back. Another loss for the hotel.

    An hotel is part of the SERVICE industry. We have to do extras.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    And if you work in Maintenance, you get 10 bucks an hour.

    Leave a comment:


  • mh892
    replied
    Originally posted by cnick001
    Windows and water pipes break, seemingly always at 3 am when I'm on duty, but some plywood and a drill, or shutting off a well are nice easy fixes. However recently since the end of the summer has brought calm to my facility, I've had "suggestions" from the manager to paint the guard shack since otherwise I'm not very busy.
    However,, silly me, I painted it too well, and now I'm painting the barn next to it. The troubling part is, while I'm up on the ladder painting, just anyone can, and does blow past the booth. And the annoying thing, the pay for putting 10 gallons on one side of a barn in 3 days is the same as for sitting in a booth, or patrolling (which I enjoy).
    Sorry for the bit of a rant, but I'm curious to see if anyone else has seen this crossover from security to "night maintenence" in their workplace?
    This is the way it is;
    Security matters= Security Officer.
    Corperate Management= CEO
    Hiring= Personnel Office
    Water pipes= Maintenance Dept.
    Painting= Maintenance Dept.
    Plywood and drill= Maintenance Dept.
    Picking up trash= Maintenance Dept.
    MAINTENANCE= MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT

    I've seen job advertisements like; Security Guard, $7.00 Hour. Job includes cleaning, taking out trash, changing light bulbs, assisting others setting up and breaking down conference rooms, repairing (pick an item), cetra, cetra.

    Bottom line. The job is Security or it is not Security.

    These suggestions for added services are NOT for your benefit. Someone else will reap from your free labor. You work in Security or you work in the Maintenance Department.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTGuard
    I don't volunteer for anything.
    Unfortuantly there are some SOs at my site who are more than willing to do such added services. Before I was assigned to the site a couple of officers painted the inside of the building which houses the Guard Shack and scale operators office. They've replaced ceiling tiles, worked on monitors and video systems, plugged tires on client vehicles and even picked up trash in parking lots.
    Of course, don't tell them to go into the parking lot and confront someone who not supposed to be there. Suddenly they are all timid and frightened. Sometimes I think it would be better for them to go apply for jobs as janitors and get out of the security business altogether.
    Either way, when they volunteer for these little extra duties it becomes expected of the rest of us and then the next thing I know I'm doing twice the work and getting paid the same as before. Screw that.
    Exactly. And when it comes time to do their job, they're busy doing something that's "value added" and the client gets to have a field day with them. Even if the client doesn't sue, kiss your job good-bye, and perhaps your security licensing.

    If something big does happen... Expect to be fired, and sued in court.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Are you contract? If so, you have completely opened your employer to a "lessening standard of care" lawsuit by performing tasks that are not contractually required. Only, they are now, because you (as an agent of the company) have accepted the added duties and are doing them.

    Your job is outlined in your post orders. If you are doing anything but what those post orders say, you are derelict in your duties, and the courts have found that anything that happens on your shift is your fault, and your company's fault.

    I've used this example before:
    Security in hotels take towels to guests. Nowhere in the contractual obligations or post orders does it say security takes towels to guests. If there is an incident in the parking lot or lobby or another floor, the client has an easy scape goat in their negligence lawsuit: The security company and the security guard.

    In this case, if someone blows by your booth while you are painting the barn and steals property or harms people, you are directly responsible for that. In some states, criminally responsible (criminal negligence). As you can't prove that its anywhere in your contractual duties to paint barns or guard shacks, the client will say "the guard did it of his own free will. He didn't protect us! Your honor, we want the security company to pay for any damages real or percieved" and the company will say "the guard did it without our knowledge or consent. Your honor, we ask that the guard be found to be negligent in his duties and apply for injunctive relief against the respondant superior claim by the client."

    Never, ever, allow a client to "add" services without getting those services in writing to your company, and your company issuing new post orders. We went round and round with a client on this at my former employer. He would issue verbal orders relating to such things as towing and barring people from the property (actual security issues as outlined by the contract.) He refused to put them in writing, as the contract specified. The next day, he would claim those orders were never issued, and "security is towing cars on their own!"

    Why, you may ask, would he do this? Irate residents having to pay 300-400 dollars in fees from the impound lot. They wanted his head, so he blamed "those courtesy guards are doing things that they're not supposed to," and then demanded the guard pay for the towing fees!

    Leave a comment:


  • EMTGuard
    replied
    I don't volunteer for anything.
    Unfortuantly there are some SOs at my site who are more than willing to do such added services. Before I was assigned to the site a couple of officers painted the inside of the building which houses the Guard Shack and scale operators office. They've replaced ceiling tiles, worked on monitors and video systems, plugged tires on client vehicles and even picked up trash in parking lots.
    Of course, don't tell them to go into the parking lot and confront someone who not supposed to be there. Suddenly they are all timid and frightened. Sometimes I think it would be better for them to go apply for jobs as janitors and get out of the security business altogether.
    Either way, when they volunteer for these little extra duties it becomes expected of the rest of us and then the next thing I know I'm doing twice the work and getting paid the same as before. Screw that.

    Leave a comment:


  • cnick001
    started a topic Securi-Maintenance

    Securi-Maintenance

    Windows and water pipes break, seemingly always at 3 am when I'm on duty, but some plywood and a drill, or shutting off a well are nice easy fixes. However recently since the end of the summer has brought calm to my facility, I've had "suggestions" from the manager to paint the guard shack since otherwise I'm not very busy.
    However,, silly me, I painted it too well, and now I'm painting the barn next to it. The troubling part is, while I'm up on the ladder painting, just anyone can, and does blow past the booth. And the annoying thing, the pay for putting 10 gallons on one side of a barn in 3 days is the same as for sitting in a booth, or patrolling (which I enjoy).
    Sorry for the bit of a rant, but I'm curious to see if anyone else has seen this crossover from security to "night maintenence" in their workplace?

Leaderboard

Collapse
Working...
X