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School shootings in Montreal

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  • School shootings in Montreal

    Is anyone who works or has worked school security have any comments about the incident that happened this afternoon here in Montreal?
    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

  • #2
    What happened in Montreal?

    Comment


    • #3
      MONTREAL (CP) - A trenchcoat-clad shooter with a scowl and a Mohawk haircut turned a college cafeteria into a combat zone with a commando-style assault that left him and a young woman dead Wednesday.

      Carrying an automatic rifle, two other guns, and dressed head to toe in black, the man stormed into the sprawling downtown Dawson College and began coldly cutting down students. Ninteen people were wounded, five critically.

      Several published reports identified the gunman as Kimveer Gill, 25, of Laval, north of Montreal. Police would not confirm the gunman's identity.

      An online image gallery on Gill's blog contains more than 50 photos depicting the young man in various poses holding a Baretta CX4 Storm semi-automatic rifle and donning a long black trenchcoat and combat boots.

      "His name is Trench. you will come to know him as the Angel of Death," he wrote on his vampirefreaks.com profile.

      Hundreds of screaming and sobbing students spilled out onto the city streets in the shadow of the fabled Montreal Forum hockey arena after the first shots were fired on Wednesday.

      Inside, the cafeteria was transformed for 15 minutes into a shooting gallery in a scene eerily reminiscent of the city's 1989 Ecole Polytechnique massacre in which 14 women were killed.

      The gunman took cover behind a row of vending machines and exchanged gunfire with police while petrified students dropped to the floor in an effort to elude the barrage of bullets.

      Surrounded by police, he repeatedly barked a single order each time the officers inched toward him: "Get back! Get back!"

      The exchange ended with the attacker slumped on the floor, collapsed in a hail of gunfire.

      The dead student was identified in published reports as Anastasia DeSousa, 18, of Montreal. Police would not confirm her identity.

      There have been conflicting reports about how the gunman was shot and killed.

      Police Chief Yvan Delorme said that officers killed the gunman. However, witnesses told La Presse he shot himself in the head after police a bullet struck him in the leg. Officers then dragged him outside, where he died on the street.

      Delorme said the attacker sprayed gunfire at random targets. He said provincial police had been called in to investigate, which is customary in a killing involving the local force.

      "The only thing I can say is that he was a young man of Canadian origin," Delorme said.

      He said police were able to respond quickly because two officers were already at the college on a drug-related matter when they heard gunshots and took action right away.

      Delorme said the lessons learned from the Montreal Massacre about the need to co-ordinate emergency services and act promptly helped save lives.

      "Before our technique was to establish a perimeter around the place and wait for the SWAT team. Now the first police officers go right inside. The way they acted saved lives (today)."

      The gunman stormed into the school over the lunch hour, with a scowl on his face and an automatic weapon in his hands.

      "He looked really mad," said Mathieu Dominique, 17, who was having a cigarette by the door when the shooter burst in less than three metres away from him.

      "He was really into (the) shooting. . . He looked like he really wanted to kill people. . . . It was like, bullet after bullet. It was like a burst - like at least six shots in two seconds."

      Another student, Soher Marous, said the gunman said nothing when he entered the college.

      "He had a stone-cold face, there was nothing on his face." Marous said. "He didn't yell out any slogans or anything. He just started opening fire. He was a cold-blooded killer."

      The gunman continued firing away as he approached the cafeteria. Andrea Barone was sitting there after lunch with his girlfriend when he heard shots ring out.

      "At first I thought it was a firecracker," said Barone, 17. "Then I turned around and I saw him. He was dressed in a black trenchcoat and I saw his hand firing a handgun in every direction."

      Barone said all the students hit the floor to take cover.

      A police officer emerged within seconds from a corner next to the cafeteria and fired on the gunman, he said. The shot missed.

      A few more police officers showed up, taking cover behind a wall beside the cafeteria. The gunman was surrounded with his back to the vending machines.

      Many students, meanwhile, were trapped in the line of fire.

      Barone said it was like a running battle with five or six shots fired in both directions every minute but he said the officers were hesitant to move in because of the students.

      Another witness said students began snapping photos and capturing videos from their cell-phone cameras as they watched the scene from a third-floor balcony.

      That's when the gunman put a scare into them.

      "The shooter sees us - and he shoots upwards," said Gianni Petrella, 17.

      "He shoots the ceiling and you could feel little pieces of cement falling down. Dust."

      Within minutes, the attacker was hit during a barrage of at least six shots fired into the cafeteria, Barone said. Police then helped the students leave the area, crawling out on their bellies along a wall.

      Barone said as they were crawling out toward an exit they saw a girl who had been shot in the torso and who was face down in a pool of blood.

      He said officers told them: 'Don't look, don't look. Keep going out.' Montreal police said one young woman died but gave no details.

      Police at one point warned students to lie on the ground again amid fears there could be another gunman. Although early reports suggested there could have been several suspects, police said there was only one.

      "For now, I am limiting it to one suspect who died after a police intervention on site," Delorme told a news conference.

      Delorme did not give details of the gunfire exchange between police and the suspect.

      Ambulance and hospital officials said the shooting victims included men and women.

      Delorme dismissed suggestions that race or terrorism played a role.

      "There's no information that leads us to believe that it's something other than what happened at the scene."

      The streets around the school filled with hysterical students in the minutes and hours after the shooting.

      Devansh Shri Vastava said he was in the cafeteria when a man dressed in black combat clothing stormed in and began shooting at people.

      "He had a laser gun or something, a big rifle, and he just started shooting at people," he said.

      "We all ran upstairs. There were cops firing. It was so crazy. I was terrified. The guy was shooting at people randomly. He didn't care he was just shooting at everybody. I just got out."

      Derick Osei, 19, said he also saw the gunman.

      "I just got out of class and I was walking down the stairs," Osei said.

      "He had one of them SWAT army guns and just started shooting up the place. I ran up to the third floor and I looked down and he was still shooting. He was hiding behind the vending machines and he came out with a gun.

      Osei said he saw a girl shot in the leg before he ran upstairs to escape.

      "At first he was shooting around the caf and he looked up and saw there were people on the third floor and he started aiming for the third floor. I thought 'I am not trying to get shot' so I got out."

      The shootings recalled Marc Lepine's murderous rampage at Montreal's Ecole Polytechnique school on Dec. 6, 1989, when he opened fire and ended up killing 14 women.

      Another shooting in Montreal occurred in Montreal in 1992 when Concordia University professor Valery Fabrikant killed four colleagues.

      Ann Lynch, chief of clinical operations at Montreal General Hospital, said 11 patients were brought in, eight in critical condition. Less critically wounded were taken to three other area hospitals as well.

      "The nature of the injuries are all gunshot wounds to the abdomen, to the chest, one head injury and also several to the limbs, peripheral limbs, arms and legs," she said.

      "At this point we are certainly watching all the patients extremely carefully and certainly the team will be doing its utmost for each and every one of those patients."

      Lynch said the emergency room was a steady stream of red-eyed students looking for information about friends.

      The hospital had a team of social workers providing support to family members.

      In Ottawa, Prime Minister Stephen Harper called the shootings a "cowardly and senseless act."

      "Our primary concern right now is to ensure the safety and recovery of all those who were injured during this tragedy," Harper said in a statement.

      "On behalf of the government of Canada and all Canadians, our thoughts and prayers are with the injured and their loved ones, and to the students and staff of the college who are all victims of this terrible tragedy."

      The shootings disrupted traffic in and around the area and also led to the closure of several subway stations for several hours.

      Dawson is a junior college which is attended by students after Grade 11 because there is no Grade 12 in Quebec. The institution is home to about 7,000 students who are usually enrolled in a two-year pre-university program or a three-year technical program.

      In Montreal, Premier Jean Charest called it a sad day.

      "Today there wasn't a Quebecer who didn't stop what they were doing to find out what was happening at Dawson College," he said after arriving from Quebec City.

      "Our life was literally stopped today."

      School officials said the college will remain closed until Monday.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll bet they will find out that this guy had a facination with Harris and Klebold, the Coulimbine killers.

        I'm glad to hear that Canadian cops know how to deal with an active shooter. I was impressed.

        Comment


        • #5
          I work for Campus Security at a Downtown University. This is all to close to home. Security patrolls were increased.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by gloria_00748
            I work for Campus Security at a Downtown University. This is all to close to home. Security patrolls were increased.
            I'm sure the guards are unarmed, right? An unarmed security guard in this case would have simply been another victim. I'm one of the rare people on this board that believed only police should be armed. I'm rethinking my position.

            Last week I had a meeting with the Director of Security at McGill. I was not impressed that a large institution like this believed in Observe & Report security only
            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

            Comment


            • #7
              With the proliferation of cell phones, the point of having unarmed "observe and report only" security is quickly becoming useless. The faculty and students can call the police just as easily as the unarmed "observe and report only" security could.

              Neither are equipped to deal with an active shooter.
              Some Kind of Commando Leader

              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                With the proliferation of cell phones, the point of having unarmed "observe and report only" security is quickly becoming useless. The faculty and students can call the police just as easily as the unarmed "observe and report only" security could.

                Neither are equipped to deal with an active shooter.
                This also explains why daytime security is becoming rare in hotels. If all they do is observe & report ANY manager can do it. They only keep overnight security because it's cheaper than paying a manager
                I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by gloria_00748
                  I work for Campus Security at a Downtown University. This is all to close to home. Security patrolls were increased.
                  My sister used to run the daycare at Place Ville Marie. (One of Montreal's tallest skyscrappers). My daughter worked at the A&W. The day after 9/11 the place was swarming with unarmed contract security guards. As if a security guard could stop a plane from hitting a building. And the fact that they were brought in by a contract company seems to me that they wouldn't know the place & probably wouldn't have been much help in an evacuation either. False sense of security to make the people FEEL secure maybe?
                  I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                  Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by histfan71
                    I'll bet they will find out that this guy had a facination with Harris and Klebold, the Coulimbine killers.

                    I'm glad to hear that Canadian cops know how to deal with an active shooter. I was impressed.
                    Apparently he liked to play a video game based on Coulimbine (sp?).

                    The police are now saying that he might have actually shot himself. The rumours are that a Montreal Officer hit him in the foot. He then shot himself. The Surete du Quebec is investigating. In Quebec when the police shoot someone another police force has to do the investigation.
                    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Another police force to investigate.....Is there not a SIU in Quebec?? A civilian Special Investigations Unit appointed by the province to oversee (investigate) the police??
                      The news I saw indicated the suspect was shot in the arm by police and then he turned the gun onto himself and shot his head to commit suicide.
                      1 young lady is dead and 2 or 3 are "extremely critical". The news report also showed cellphone camera action of the students yelling and running away as the suspect was nearby!
                      What the police have learned from the 1989 14-student murders was to not standby and wait...this time, the police stormed into the campus building to engage the threat. The actions taken by the Montreal police no doubt saved numerous lives! I dont know of any armed campus police in Canada. Most seem to have security or a mix of special constables and security personnel.
                      I used to work in highschool security for the local school board. Hated it! I enjoyed being outnumbered 100 to 1 during a confrontation with a misbehaving student. So I quit and continued to work for the City.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Cityguy
                        Another police force to investigate.....Is there not a SIU in Quebec?? A civilian Special Investigations Unit appointed by the province to oversee (investigate) the police??
                        No there is not! The SQ usually investigates Montreal shootings & Montreal investigates SQ shootings. Either investigate in other cities.
                        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm glad they got him. To me it just goes to show the need for more people to be armed in order to defend themselves.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            At least the media is saying some good things about Dawson's unarmed security. http://www.canada.com/montrealgazett...3-6bd1e6f97a8e
                            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                            Comment

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