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Verbal Judo

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  • Tennsix
    replied
    Good utilization of the force continuum.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    Yeah, you are right but some guys just won't play ball until CPT Taser shows up.
    I had a guy, military or something, play the "you can't do anything to me game." Came up at me, got pushed back, started circling me. After talking to him for a minute, asking him what he was doing, I got bored with him and drew my OC. He was like, "What's that?"

    "This is pepper spray. I'm going to spray you with it if you don't move back, because your very confrontational and make me afraid you'll attack me."

    He jumped back about 10 feet, trying to get far enough away from me to be out of the spray range.

    Things like this is why I got very few deployments of OC, and alot of half deployments. Most people like to "test" security officers, even police officers, trying to get control of the situation. So long as you can clearly articulate that you have control, and will use force to maintain it, they tend to back up - or they attack and its game on.

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  • davis002
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    Yeah, you are right but some guys just won't play ball until CPT Taser shows up.
    Mental Health incidents are never fun.

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  • Tennsix
    replied
    Originally posted by davis002
    I agree, but if you apply it correctly it will subdue a vast majority of incidents without force.
    Yeah, you are right but some guys just won't play ball until CPT Taser shows up.

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  • davis002
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    ...and it doesn't always work.
    I agree, but if you apply it correctly it will subdue a vast majority of incidents without force.

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  • Tennsix
    replied
    Originally posted by davis002
    Everyone needs to remember that Verbal Judo is not an exact science, it's an art form.
    ...and it doesn't always work.

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  • davis002
    replied
    Excerpt from "Verbal Judo: The Gentle Art of Persuasion"

    The 'Wanna Bet?" Guy
    "I discovered early on as a police officer that one thing I hated was having my authority challenged. There was always somebody who'd say in a nasty, whiny, contentious voice, "You can't do that to me!" It seems I heard that twenty or thirty times a day, and it always angered me. Every time, a little voice went off in my head, 'You wanna bet? Watch me!' Imedialtely I would take a more aggresive, attacking stance, and each time I made errors I was not able to explain them on paper or justify to a superior.
    The only person who had ever said anything about that problem was the old Indian who taught me things while i was growing up. One day when I was eleven, he said out of the blue, 'Thompson, some day you will have enemies. Here's how you handle 'em. First always define. Then, name them. Then you will own them.' The indian walked off into the forest and I thought, 'What? What does that mean?' It sounded kind of like some Indian folklore, and I hardly gave it another thought until I was thirty-five. Then I was on the streets, making enemies and not being able to handle them.
    I still didn't understand his advice, but I acted on it anyway. What did I have to lose? I knew my biggest enemy was anyone who challenged my authority. One day I wrote that down. I had defined him. Naming him was more difficult, but I finally decided to call him by the voice that went off inside me. That voice always said, 'Wanna bet?' So I named my enemy the 'Wanna Bet?' Guy. I said to myself, 'George, be careful of the 'Wanna Bet?' Guy or he'll own you somewhere, sometime.'
    The very next night I placed a young man under arrest, and he came back with 'You can't touch me. I'll do what I want. MY father's on the city council; he'll have your job!'
    Immediately I thought, 'Wanna Bet?' But at the same time, a warning bell went off in my head. 'There he is, the 'Wanna Bet?' Guy! Be careful! He's gonna get you!'
    I literally took a step back, forcing myself to remain calm and not say or do anything that would jeoparidize the integrity of that very legitimate arrest. I wantedd the bust, all right, and I wanted it to stick because of the kid's snotty attitude. I could have lost it all - and maybe even my job - if I had let him get to me and make me do something stupid. I dodn't, and he got in big trouble.
    To this day you cannot challenge my authority and make me show anger. Sure, I'm still angry inside. My trigger has been cocked, but you can't pull it. My trigger guard is in place. I defined my enemy, and I named him. Now I own him, rather than the other way around. What is your enemy? Define it. Name it. Own it."

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  • davis002
    replied
    Everyone needs to remember that Verbal Judo is not an exact science, it's an art form.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charger
    replied
    I've been through a couple Verbal Judo courses, and they helped IMMENSELY on dealing with difficult people... I'm trying to convince my co-workers to go through at least one course on it, or read the book...

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  • davis002
    replied
    Originally posted by CAR54
    I did a quick search and found the writer has 3 books out. While they all probably cover the same material is there one in particular anyone would recommend?

    The one which sounded closest to what I'd be looking for was, "Verbal Judo: Words As a Force Option"..unfortunately that was selling for $60 on Amazon (kind of steep for an underpaid security guard).
    I suggest picking up "Verbal Judo: The Gentle Art of Persuasion". That is all you need to get a great understanding of the concept and techniques of Verbal Judo. The best part is... it's only about $10. I've read it a few times, and it's a great book with alot of even greater stories.

    Leave a comment:


  • CAR54
    replied
    I did a quick search and found the writer has 3 books out. While they all probably cover the same material is there one in particular anyone would recommend?

    The one which sounded closest to what I'd be looking for was, "Verbal Judo: Words As a Force Option"..unfortunately that was selling for $60 on Amazon (kind of steep for an underpaid security guard).

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Verbal Judo is great. Its also often called TactCOM or Tactical Communications. I like the techniques taught in the book because I've found they are effective in overcoming resistance on part of the subject.

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  • jmaccauley
    replied
    I am a Verbal Judo instructor and have practiced it for many years. It is simply a great tool for cutting through the "posturing" and getting the desired results. The bottom line in any encounter is to get the job done.It can be the hard way, but most times thats not necessary. Many people need to save face, so let them. This is what I teach my rookies; "say what you want, but do what I say." Explain yourself and the response that you expect. If after exhausting the rational approach, try saying, " is there anything I can do to convince you to comply?" Thats when you make the force option available.

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  • davis002
    started a topic Verbal Judo

    Verbal Judo

    First let me start off by saying that I am new to this forum. I have briefly browsed through some of the threads/posts, and finally decided that I would like to throw in my two cents.

    How many individuals in this forum have received training in "Verbal Judo"? I have noticed when I was reading "What's your style?...", that a certain forum member, of whom I won't single out, could learn a great deal from Verbal Judo.

    Basically, i'm just wondering who has received formal training or who has read the book?

    Also, does anyone have any personal experiences where applying Verbal Judo techniques helped in the field?

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