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  • adding value

    Here is a question, I need some ideas on how to add value at your site. Anything that is going to help out the client.

  • #2
    Adding Value

    Originally posted by truckstop cop
    Here is a question, I need some ideas on how to add value at your site. Anything that is going to help out the client.
    I have to applaud you for even thinking in those terms. Most company owners wished more were like you! There are many ways to add value but most will cost your company money (guard tour systems, higher tech communications, integreted surveillance equipment, online incident reporting, etc.). Some won't (more frequent client meetings, recurring post order review, logbooks, etc.). I would take any ideas to your management first. They should be appreciative.
    Richard Dickinson
    Dickinson Security Management Group, LLC
    DSMG Provides a Variety of Software Products and Consulting Services to the Contract Security Industry
    www.hrdickinson.com

    Comment


    • #3
      When I think of "value added" it brings me back to mopping floors, picking up litter in the parking lot, cleaning countertops, etc...
      "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
      "The Curve" 1998

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by BHR Lawson
        When I think of "value added" it brings me back to mopping floors, picking up litter in the parking lot, cleaning countertops, etc...
        Delivering towels, unblocking toilets etc (oh yea, that's what my staff already do )
        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

        Comment


        • #5
          Study your local laws if you are an officer.. Laws that pretain to your state, county and city, then learn what you can do legally, and go all the way with it. An educated Officer is top quality!
          Deputy Sheriff

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by hrdickinson
            I have to applaud you for even thinking in those terms. Most company owners wished more were like you! There are many ways to add value but most will cost your company money (guard tour systems, higher tech communications, integreted surveillance equipment, online incident reporting, etc.). Some won't (more frequent client meetings, recurring post order review, logbooks, etc.). I would take any ideas to your management first. They should be appreciative.
            I think of those as enhancing the services you already have and making sure you're providing the best possible service to the client. When I hear "value-added," I think the same things BHR Lawson and HotelSecurity do, unfortunately.

            Comment


            • #7
              Same here, too many times have I been called to sweep a parking lot, or clean the bathrooms... Where on my uniform does it say Janitorial?
              "What if this is as good as it gets?" ~ Melvin Udall

              Comment


              • #8
                I don't believe Guard Tour Services are "value-added." I believe they are a method for dealing with guard accountability issues which can be screened out by supervisor presence, post orders, and higher quality employees.

                I know what everyone is saying. "Value Added" to me means taking towels. But I honestly believe online reporting systems are both cheaper and a better value to client and company than guard log books. No one here can read my handwriting. But you can read my typing at 93 WPM with 5 percent error rating.

                Things like supervisor presence, client meetings, updating post orders... These shouldn't be added value to me. They should be in the contract from the get go! 2 year old post orders are a good way to get sued.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                Comment


                • #9
                  Be sure you are not stepping on any toes, specifically Union and other Workers. If a Contract, check with your Office & Client for clearance.
                  Then look who is providing monthly inspections of first aid kits, extinguishers, exit lights, daily/weekly sprinkler riser readings. Read up on the rules and make a plan. I would not suggest doing the annual performance inspections to extinguishers etc. They may need to be be performed by a certified individual, plus you do not want to take on any more insurance related problems / liabilities.

                  Once you start, be prepared to do it continually.

                  Are you able to get on the Health and Safety committee? Sit in on the meetings?
                  Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
                  Groucho Marx

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Eric
                    Be sure you are not stepping on any toes, specifically Union and other Workers. If a Contract, check with your Office & Client for clearance.
                    Then look who is providing monthly inspections of first aid kits, extinguishers, exit lights, daily/weekly sprinkler riser readings. Read up on the rules and make a plan. I would not suggest doing the annual performance inspections to extinguishers etc. They may need to be be performed by a certified individual, plus you do not want to take on any more insurance related problems / liabilities.

                    Once you start, be prepared to do it continually.

                    Are you able to get on the Health and Safety committee? Sit in on the meetings?
                    These are good, but extremely industrial. I've worked many sites that even asking those questions would draw funny looks from management, "we never do any of that. Stop making work for us." Of course, these are office and residential sites where the primary duty of the security officer is protection of life from criminal operations. In other words, private law enforcement.

                    Even if you aren't doing the certified inspections, its a good idea to check the fire extinguisher levels. I don't believe in reading the levels of every extinguisher in the building and entering them into a log every round, however, because of the likelyhood it will turn into another guard tour system and the guard will fear "if I miss one, its an evaluation of performance, so I'll ignore that noise and continue on with my fire extinguisher check lest I forget where I'm at."
                    Some Kind of Commando Leader

                    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I may not be understanding the term extremely industrial correctly. Construction, office, hospital, casino sites virtually anywhere could possibly use those ideas.
                      I would imagine each state, and up here, province have different guidelines. In Ontario, we are legislated to have a H&S group depending on employee numbers. I value add as a member of it.
                      Like wise with first aid kits and extinguishers. Our Department took this on to value add.

                      Yes it is a good idea to inspect extinguishers (and know where they all are) while on rounds, a log though with serial numbers/date inspected/by and a tag on each unit signed monthly, would be better.

                      If management are saying stop making work for us, that may be sign to move on or except the observe/report/wave free position.


                      Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                      These are good, but extremely industrial. I've worked many sites that even asking those questions would draw funny looks from management, "we never do any of that. Stop making work for us." Of course, these are office and residential sites where the primary duty of the security officer is protection of life from criminal operations. In other words, private law enforcement.

                      Even if you aren't doing the certified inspections, its a good idea to check the fire extinguisher levels. I don't believe in reading the levels of every extinguisher in the building and entering them into a log every round, however, because of the likelyhood it will turn into another guard tour system and the guard will fear "if I miss one, its an evaluation of performance, so I'll ignore that noise and continue on with my fire extinguisher check lest I forget where I'm at."
                      Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
                      Groucho Marx

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Adding Value

                        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                        I don't believe Guard Tour Services are "value-added." I believe they are a method for dealing with guard accountability issues which can be screened out by supervisor presence, post orders, and higher quality employees.

                        I know what everyone is saying. "Value Added" to me means taking towels. But I honestly believe online reporting systems are both cheaper and a better value to client and company than guard log books. No one here can read my handwriting. But you can read my typing at 93 WPM with 5 percent error rating.

                        Things like supervisor presence, client meetings, updating post orders... These shouldn't be added value to me. They should be in the contract from the get go! 2 year old post orders are a good way to get sued.
                        Let me clarify my point! I was speaking of "adding value" from the viewpoint of a security contractor. In those terms, a value added service or program is anything that you can offer to differentiate your company from the competition. This can run the gamut from a shiney new Ford F-150 on site, to higher paid officers with benefits, to online report generators, to guard tour systems. Tour systems are a value added feature. They can provide virtually realtime verification of presence and activities to a supervisor, or a client for that matter, depending on how they are configured.

                        I don't know about the world of inhouse security but sweeping floors and similar chores is lunacy! Unless it's in the post orders, you don't do it. I would tell my people that when requested by a client to perform an unauthorized task, to be polite and call their supervisor immediately. You are there to protect the client's property and employees, not ingratiate yourself with the client contact or other employees.

                        (Oh boy, I can't wait to see the heat I have to take on this one)
                        Richard Dickinson
                        Dickinson Security Management Group, LLC
                        DSMG Provides a Variety of Software Products and Consulting Services to the Contract Security Industry
                        www.hrdickinson.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Tomorrow night the emergency power circuit for my 25 floor hotel will be shut off so that the newly renovated elevators can be connected to it. We will have no water, stairway lights or elevators. (It is something that has to be done there is never a good time to do it). As a result I will double my in-house staff from 1 to 2. I will also be hiring 2 agents from a contract company. 3 Managers will be there as well as a Bellboy & Houseman. There are very few check ins after 23h00. However if someone does arrive with baggage we ALL are expected to help them get to their room. Do you think the contract people are going to refuse?
                          I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                          Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by hrdickinson
                            Let me clarify my point! I was speaking of "adding value" from the viewpoint of a security contractor. In those terms, a value added service or program is anything that you can offer to differentiate your company from the competition. This can run the gamut from a shiney new Ford F-150 on site, to higher paid officers with benefits, to online report generators, to guard tour systems. Tour systems are a value added feature. They can provide virtually realtime verification of presence and activities to a supervisor, or a client for that matter, depending on how they are configured.

                            I don't know about the world of inhouse security but sweeping floors and similar chores is lunacy! Unless it's in the post orders, you don't do it. I would tell my people that when requested by a client to perform an unauthorized task, to be polite and call their supervisor immediately. You are there to protect the client's property and employees, not ingratiate yourself with the client contact or other employees.

                            (Oh boy, I can't wait to see the heat I have to take on this one)
                            These are the things that security companies are calling "value-added services" now days. It is common for a contract security guard to have such value added services as: Weigh Scale Operator, Janitoral Engineer, Concierge, First Aid Squad Member, etc.

                            Some of these are not bad. The issue, of course, is that many supervisory personnel and many companies are putting these into the post orders. A common example was that a security guard was ordered to turn his "security guard" badge over to the supervisor as he showed up for work. He did so. The new one said "Securex Services," a now-bought out Tampa company, and he was told that his duties were expanded to include mopping floors. He refused, as he was not informed of this and was an armed officer. He was terminated on the spot for failing to obey his post orders.

                            Value Added Services has become another term that the security companies are using to ensure that they can "prove a negative" not by articulating the security services they provide, but by adding non-security functions to the job.

                            Many guards double as valets, for example. Who's watching the property while your parking cars? Nobody.

                            This is why the term "Value Added Services" has been corrupted.
                            Some Kind of Commando Leader

                            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Eric
                              I may not be understanding the term extremely industrial correctly. Construction, office, hospital, casino sites virtually anywhere could possibly use those ideas.
                              I would imagine each state, and up here, province have different guidelines. In Ontario, we are legislated to have a H&S group depending on employee numbers. I value add as a member of it.
                              Like wise with first aid kits and extinguishers. Our Department took this on to value add.

                              Yes it is a good idea to inspect extinguishers (and know where they all are) while on rounds, a log though with serial numbers/date inspected/by and a tag on each unit signed monthly, would be better.

                              If management are saying stop making work for us, that may be sign to move on or except the observe/report/wave free position.
                              H&S Groups are not required in the United States. Basically, a contractor who sells that equipment must inspect it semi-annually as part of the contract.

                              I don't have a problem with monthly in-house inspections of life safety equipment. But, I've seen client administrators decide to do it every round because "the guard isn't doing anything else." This is the mentality that surrounds "Value Added Services" in the US. The guard's patrol function isn't a real function (it doesn't uncover things every round), so therefore, the guard is free to perform other services - ranging from life safety to janitorial.

                              "Oh, the Guard just walks around. He should take the trash out while he's doing that, it'll give him something to do. And you know, a reason for us to actually pay those guys! It isn't like they earn that money, just walking around."
                              Some Kind of Commando Leader

                              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                              Comment

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