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  • Certification of in-house staff

    I'm 50 years old. I work in-house & have been in-house since 1977. The law in Quebec only required contract security people to be licensed. A new law was recently passed (but not yet in force) that will require ALL private security to be licensed. There will be conditions to get the license including required courses. Has anyone had this happen to them where they've been doing the job for years when all of a sudden they had to meet new requirements like this? In your experience have there been "grandfather clauses" set up so oldtimers don't have to start at zero? Could I be out of a job?
    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

  • #2
    I wouldn't worry about it. I work in a state where any type of security guard is required to be licensed and the licensing requirements for unarmed security aren't very difficult to meet.

    I'm sure you'll have no problem meeting the new requirements.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jackhole
      I wouldn't worry about it. I work in a state where any type of security guard is required to be licensed and the licensing requirements for unarmed security aren't very difficult to meet.

      I'm sure you'll have no problem meeting the new requirements.
      My worry is that in Quebec every profession requires that you write the examin in French. I can't
      I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
      Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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      • #4
        It really depends on who's creating the act. If its a "consumer protection" gimmick, then "you're part of the problem," and licensing will "fix that problem."
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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        • #5
          Originally posted by HotelSecurity
          My worry is that in Quebec every profession requires that you write the examin in French. I can't
          Ohh, that could be a problem.

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          • #6
            California recently did this. To be licensed in CA you have to pass a 40-hour training course which is spread out over six months. Anyone who was licensed before this law went into effect, which I believe was July 2005, was grandfathered in and did not have to take the training.

            California also just required that all in-house security guards get licensed through the Bureau of Security and Investigative Services; however, in-house security is exempt from taking the 40-hour training! Does that make any sense?!?

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            • #7
              In Washington State, proprietary (in-house) security is not required to take any type of training. Contract Security however; has to pass an 8-hour class with a test.

              Every security co. where I worked I took the same training, but now that I am proprietary, the only training I took was called "Pro-ACT" and that is in-house training for restraining and defending yourself from patients, it's not mandated by the state.
              "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
              "The Curve" 1998

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              • #8
                What is the logic behind licensing contract officers and not licensing in-house officers?

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                • #9
                  Pure Consumer Protection. Neither Wisconsin nor Florida license in-house personnel unless they wish the authority to carry firearms.

                  Basically, since unregulated contract security is a threat to the safety of the people of Florida, the state regulates contract security personnel and companies. In-house security, unless armed with firearms, is considered "any other profession" and is not regulated in the slightest bit.

                  The idea being that contract security companies contiously violate laws, but in-house security departments don't or something.
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                  • #10
                    Nathan,

                    I also think a big difference between contract and in-house is that with a contract company you are purchasing a service from a third party. In California, almost all service industries are regulated in some way by the state. To be a barber, plumber, auto mechanic, contractor, etc. all require you to be licensed by the state. Consumer protection is the name of the game.

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                    • #11
                      Yeah, I wouldnt worry about it too much.. Anything new that they require for you to conform to, exam wise or other, they allow for training time, and every state I have worked in, its not hard to pass, especially since you have been doing this for as long as you have, it will be second nature to you.

                      These license issues, IMO, are new methods for your local government to make a profit on. Tax this, tax that, ohh, and charge for that too.. LOL.. I will admit, sometimes these licenses can get a little expensive. In California, I spent close to a grand getting all the different licenses, where in Wyoming, it was 30, then Colorado is like 150, and other states varied as well. Most Security Opps dont care for the yearly renewel fee's as they already paid once. Its a slight nuisance, thats all!
                      Deputy Sheriff

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                      • #12
                        Some Kind of Commando Leader

                        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                        • #13
                          I forget that he isnt in the states, where you dont even have to be able to read, and can still be qualified to work, per affirmative action or descrimination laws....LOL!

                          I like french toast, does that count?
                          Deputy Sheriff

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                          • #14
                            I don't speak French, but I think I understood the question and the answer choices. I think the answer is D

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                            • #15
                              I can read French so if the exam is multple choice I'm ok

                              By the way Nathan I'm an Anglophone. A French speaking Quebecer is a Francophone & someone who doesn't speak French or English is an Alophone.
                              I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                              Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                              Comment

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