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  • Professional Security Training Requirements

    Criminal Justice Orientation
    Judicial Process
    Arrest, Search and Seizure
    Rules of Evidence
    State Criminal Codes
    Legal Liabilities
    Controlled Substances
    Court Testimony
    Victims Rights
    Domestic Violence
    Ethnic Intimidation & Hate Crimes
    Problem Solving
    Crime Prevention
    Officer Survival
    Pedestrian Contacts
    Gangs
    Vehicle Contacts
    Vehicle Searches
    Building Searches
    Civil Disputes
    Crowd Control
    Hazardous Materials
    Area Searches
    Private Security’s Role in Terrorism
    Incident Command System
    Biohazards Awareness
    State Traffic Code
    Traffic Direction & Control
    Traffic Accident Investigation
    Preliminary Investigations
    Crime Scenes
    Crime Scene Documentation
    Identification and Collection of Evidence
    Interview and Interrogation Techniques
    Identification of Suspects
    Report Writing
    Stress Management
    Verbal Communication Techniques
    Arrest Control
    Use of Force
    De-escalation of Force
    Personal Weapons & Potential hazards
    Alternatives to Using Deadly Force
    Searching and Handcuffing
    Control Techniques
    Sudden Custody Death Syndrome
    Weapons Retention
    Defensive Tactics
    Neck Restraints
    Impact Instruments
    Firearms Training Course (if armed)

    These are areas that I throw out as an initial idea of the basic training requirements for security officers. I haven’t listed the amount of time that would be spent on each subject. Also, some may say that there are areas listed that really only pertain to law enforcement personnel. I would say you’re right, but that those areas would be beneficial for an officer to have knowledge and understanding of the material. At any time a security officer may be interacting with law enforcement personnel they have called upon. It would be incumbent of the security officer to be knowledgeable enough not to screw a case up for the police/DA by being ignorant of – for example – how that evidence was seized and handled prior to turning it over to law enforcement.

    I have borrowed shamelessly from the Colorado Post Requirements (after all if it’s important for a leo to learn it may be similarly important for a security officer to learn). I found that the state sets a minimum of 546 hours for the Basic Academy (Academic-392 hours, Arrest Control-62 hours, Driving-40 hours, and Firearms-52 hours) and for reserve officer programs, 200-240 hours (Academic-86 hours, Arrest Control-62 hours, Firearms-52 hours, and optional Driving-40 hours).

    Programs would of course be tailored to the security industry. For example, study of the criminal codes and traffics codes may be those areas which a security officer would reasonably expect to meet. Officers should know the elements for state statutes, how to determine if the elements have been met for arrest, etc. I wouldn’t worry about teaching the law on murder for example. The aspects for weapons retention, use of force etcetera could be contained in a packaged defensive tactics program, like PPCT. This will certify an officer in 40 hours. I know this program since we use it (of which I am certified as an instructor) and it is the course given to our PD.

    The items outlined here are by no means all inclusive. In fact there could be argument over whether all of these topics would be needed even. But before we can even create a standards program for security personnel we have to have a starting point for discussion. The easiest way is to look to POST programs and work from there to develop a program for security professionals.

    These are just my initial thoughts. I open the floor for discussion.
    Last edited by aka Bull; 08-06-2006, 08:28 PM.
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

  • #2
    Wise Guy

    I recommend adding the following subjects:

    Sleeping Techniques
    Proper Donut Dunking (Borrowed from LE academy)
    Paper Tours
    Booking Off 101
    Current TV Guide Review

    Sorry. I'm a little giddy tonight.
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Mr. Security
      I recommend adding the following subjects:

      Sleeping Techniques
      Proper Donut Dunking (Borrowed from LE academy)
      Paper Tours
      Booking Off 101
      Current TV Guide Review

      Sorry. I'm a little giddy tonight.
      No problem - happens to the best of us.

      You forgot one.

      How To Get Bullet Out of Pocket and Into Pistol
      "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by aka Bull
        No problem - happens to the best of us.

        You forgot one.

        How To Get Bullet Out of Pocket and Into Pistol
        No need. Andy took my gun away again.
        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

        Comment


        • #5
          Good list but like a lot of security people it looks only on the "law enforcement" side of our job. I believe we are first responders for law, medical & fires. We should have training in first aid up to paramedic (depending on what our site requires) & from how to use a fire extinguisher & evacuation our sites to being a full member of an internal fire brigade.
          I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
          Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by HotelSecurity
            Good list but like a lot of security people it looks only on the "law enforcement" side of our job. I believe we are first responders for law, medical & fires. We should have training in first aid up to paramedic (depending on what our site requires) & from how to use a fire extinguisher & evacuation our sites to being a full member of an internal fire brigade.
            I am a Full time firefighter and part time security. To give you an idea we are required to do a 4 mth academy for my job to train us in FF1-2, Arff, Hazmat and First responder. In addition i hold certifications as a EMT-B, Hazmat Tech,D/o Pumper, Arff, MWS. As well as training in many other areas and aspects of firefighting. To keep just the basic FF1-2 Training up we have classes about 2 times a week on various subjects such as forcable entry, firefighting tactics etc.. Now why do i state this ???? Well i spend lots of time studing and attend classes to maintain all my certifications. There are very few security companies that will suppor the time or money needed to train there personnell in these area. Also they need to provide the proper equipment to do these things. To keep up EMT it is 24 CE Hrs every year plus a certain number of patient contacts. etc... I think you get my point. There are very few security companies that will support you with a police academy (which is directly related to security) So they will probably not support these extra functions. Plus they probably wont pay you extra, i know that im having a hell of a time getting EMT pay from my company. Now i do feel that the basic security officer class should be at least 160 hrs (4 Weeks) and cover arrest procedures, Tactics, self defense and the others that are listed.
            Robert
            Here endith the lesson

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by HotelSecurity
              Good list but like a lot of security people it looks only on the "law enforcement" side of our job. I believe we are first responders for law, medical & fires. We should have training in first aid up to paramedic (depending on what our site requires) & from how to use a fire extinguisher & evacuation our sites to being a full member of an internal fire brigade.
              Also:

              Preventing Workplace Violence
              Fire Panel Operation
              Perimeter Security
              Bomb Threats
              Workplace Safety
              Natural Disaster Preparedness
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by HotelSecurity
                Good list but like a lot of security people it looks only on the "law enforcement" side of our job. I believe we are first responders for law, medical & fires. We should have training in first aid up to paramedic (depending on what our site requires) & from how to use a fire extinguisher & evacuation our sites to being a full member of an internal fire brigade.
                Good point. As I stated this was the initial take off point. Other importants training topics should be added. Even in this list there will be areas that may be dropped.

                As to fire training - well I can see some level of training would be required, but if it's a full firefighting job then I would say they should have fully trained firefighters, just like there should be fully trained leos if we're talking a police dept.

                I would also say that if they want medical to the level of EMT's, then get fully certed EMT (and like anything else pay them accordingly - it shocks me how little the EMT's here with the local ambulance company make).

                Having some level of first aid/CPR, or fire fighting basics, is reasonable. Depending on how deeply you want someone trained should depend on what specialty you hire.
                "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mr. Security
                  Also:

                  Preventing Workplace Violence
                  Fire Panel Operation
                  Perimeter Security
                  Bomb Threats
                  Workplace Safety
                  Natural Disaster Preparedness
                  Other good topics as well.

                  We might add:

                  Sexual harassment
                  Discrimination
                  Child Abuse Recognition
                  At Risk Adult Abuse Recognition

                  There are many topics. Lets keep adding to the list. Then we can discuss why/why not a subject should be on the list.

                  Keep it up ladies and gentlemen. Who knows, we could be writing a future security academy cirriculum.
                  "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Arff312
                    I am a Full time firefighter and part time security. To give you an idea we are required to do a 4 mth academy for my job to train us in FF1-2, Arff, Hazmat and First responder. In addition i hold certifications as a EMT-B, Hazmat Tech,D/o Pumper, Arff, MWS. As well as training in many other areas and aspects of firefighting. To keep just the basic FF1-2 Training up we have classes about 2 times a week on various subjects such as forcable entry, firefighting tactics etc.. Now why do i state this ???? Well i spend lots of time studing and attend classes to maintain all my certifications. There are very few security companies that will suppor the time or money needed to train there personnell in these area. Also they need to provide the proper equipment to do these things. To keep up EMT it is 24 CE Hrs every year plus a certain number of patient contacts. etc... I think you get my point. There are very few security companies that will support you with a police academy (which is directly related to security) So they will probably not support these extra functions. Plus they probably wont pay you extra, i know that im having a hell of a time getting EMT pay from my company. Now i do feel that the basic security officer class should be at least 160 hrs (4 Weeks) and cover arrest procedures, Tactics, self defense and the others that are listed.
                    And there's the rub. If a security company is going to take advantage of your level of training and say it is a part of your job, then they should pay you accordingly. They're getting a free benefit by having you and using your talents outside of security work primarily. If not, then when the fire happens - call the FD.

                    I also agree that in the state of private security today no company is going to pay for training to the levels we (hopefully) will continue discussing - until the industry is forced to. It's much like police training - police departments didn't want it mandated - it costs them too much. In this day and age you can't get on (speaking generally - I know there are exceptions) without going through an academy.
                    Last edited by aka Bull; 08-07-2006, 02:08 AM.
                    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My company required I get the CPR/AED/First Aid Permit only because the company they contract with required it. As far as getting additional certification/permits/training all the security companies I've worked for do nada to promote it, though of course they all say otherwise. Any additional training I get is done on my own time and with my own money. And at $8 to $12 dollars an hour most security officers aren't willing to get the additional training as they don't see any incentive in it. Most of the officers at my site only last a few months before moving on to something else that pays better, like working for FedEx or UPS, moving into the facilities department at my site and tons of other better paying jobs. I've considered getting some POST training or taking the pc832 class (which, for all I know is part of the POST training). But the bottom line is as long as I'm "just" a security officer I get paid the same either way. It seems either your a LEO or ex-LEO and make decent money or your security and make peanuts. Unfortunately there doesn't appear to be much middle ground.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Look at my post under the Towing thread. In Quebec most contract security people are covered by this contract which requires that security that are part of a fire brigade get paid a premium. First aid requires another.

                        And I guess I'm a little out of touch with contract security in general. I've been doing security since about 1975 (it was the year after Nixon resigned). I only did contract for about 2 years. The rest has all been in-house for hotels. Working in-house in hotels we are expected to take care of ANY emergency until help arrives.

                        As a result on my own I first took the 45 hour first responder course & then the 200 hour EMT course. I had an advantage in that these college courses were free in Quebec. I took firefighting, rescue & emergency communication courses as a member of Civil Protection. Again, these courses were free.
                        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Keep in mind that having an EMT on the account when the client is not paying for professional rescuer services can be problematic. In my own state, if I so much as offer professional rescuer services, the Wisconsin division becomes a "rescue squad."

                          To me, this is a good thing, and we're looking at WI Certification for First Responder. Maybe a few EMTs, but having a full fledged Para without a Rescue Ambulence dosen't make sense - no toys to go with the Para.
                          Some Kind of Commando Leader

                          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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