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2 Way Radio Terminology

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  • ValleyOne
    replied
    One of my favorite Scanner Land stories...

    A long time ago a Trooper I knew resonded to back a county guy up on a Domestic Distubrance call. This was in the day before cell phones and such, anyhooo. The Trooper advised his dispatch that he was going to give the female a ride to her parent's house, the female was distraught didn't know the numbers just that they were headed to "Pine Street" he would advise of the number upon his arrival. This was given out over the air in Trooper speak (12 Codes). Upon his arrival the Trooper anounced his arrival, gave dispatch his mileage and advised the numbers were obscured and he would advise of them when he got out and saw them. As he was dong this the front door of the house swung open and the dad screamed out; "123 Pine St.!!!!"

    Use all the codes you want kids, if people want to 'know' them they will...

    I fully understand the concept of using codes, but if you don't the guy yor dealing with to know he's listed in your company's Bad Guy file, just get a good Otto earpiece and no one will hear but you.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by jeff194307
    We can agree to disagree on this, but we have a number of dorms here on campus and we really do not wish that they know what we are saying a all times. ( They have radios and are monitoring our transmissions) It is entirely possible that the dorm monitor may have a friend who may be the subject of our incident and it would not be appropriate to use plain english and allow everyone on campus to know what we are doing.
    Jeff my hobby is ;istening to the "police" scanner. For some of us part of the hobby is decoding the codes. If people have radios & are monitoring you don't be surprised if they also know your codes. Now-a-days with the internet it does not take long for information to be exchanged. A few years ago when the Montreal Police changed it's codes most of us in the hobby knew them before the Officers!

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  • jeff194307
    replied
    We can agree to disagree on this, but we have a number of dorms here on campus and we really do not wish that they know what we are saying a all times. ( They have radios and are monitoring our transmissions) It is entirely possible that the dorm monitor may have a friend who may be the subject of our incident and it would not be appropriate to use plain english and allow everyone on campus to know what we are doing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Codes

    Unless you use codes all the time (especially the trouble ones), you're likely to revert to plain language anyhow when things go south. Speaking in code is similar to learning another language. A novice has to "think" of the right interpretation to the new language instead of saying it automatically. Notice how some videos on TV demonstrate this in a crisis. The officer, pilot, etc.,starts yelling in plain English when the emergency reaches its peak.

    Having a few codes might be appropriate. Otherwise, stick to normal everyday language on the radio to minimize confusion.

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  • jeff194307
    replied
    At the college where I work, we recently started using a special 10 code when the police are needed. We began using this code to lessen the amount of offenders running from us. This has worked very well so far, the bad guy has no idea what is happening until he is talking with P.D. instead of security.

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  • locknid
    replied
    our company uses minimul 10 codes. mainly for on duty, off duty, break, requesting for police, dispatch telling police is on its way, emergency traffic, police on/off property, enroute somewhere, stuff like that. there have been many times I need pd but do not want the BG to know, but then a stupid dispatcher decides to use the word pd and freaks the BG out. many times we'll have a guard conducting an arrest and wants to get pd rolling before the cuffs are on because it might go bad, codes are a plus then.

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  • Squidly
    replied
    We have just started on this caper at work. Usually there is only two of us per shift so it was security 1 to security 2.
    Now every officer as there own code from Seirra Mike (the boss) then seirra 2 to 15. Phonetics and 10 codes we do not use. In emergency situations we use Colour Codes ie Code Red - Fire, Code Blue - Medical Emegency etc

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    HotelSecurity, how do you maintain a quiet post? Moreover, if there is an altercation what happens to your hand-held radio? In hotels, as in other locations in society we have an element who have turned "let us prey" into an art form? How can you effectively respond?
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    WHen necessary I turn down the volume! Another things is that overnight there are, at the most, 3 walkie talkies & 1 base in use, not much traffic. After doing this for so many years you'd be surprised how you can still use your hand & hold onto the walkie-talkie. When things get real rough, it fits into the jacket pocket.
    Last edited by HotelSecurity; 02-06-2007, 02:16 PM.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    Working in a suit & tie with no duty belt my pants would fall down if I carried my walkie-talkie on my belt so I carry it in my hand. Can't really have an earphone if you are carying it!
    HotelSecurity, how do you maintain a quiet post? Moreover, if there is an altercation what happens to your hand-held radio? In hotels, as in other locations in society we have an element who have turned "let us prey" into an art form? How can you effectively respond?
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Working in a suit & tie with no duty belt my pants would fall down if I carried my walkie-talkie on my belt so I carry it in my hand. Can't really have an earphone if you are carying it!

    Leave a comment:


  • ValleyOne
    replied
    As far as being concerned that person with whom your runnin' a check on would hear your traffic, why not just go and get a earpiece? I use otto earpieces, think the little clear tubes the alphabet soup agencies wear. I love it, they can't hear a thing and it doesn't interfer with your normal hearing.

    As far as radio codes and what not. Free speach is the way to go. With the sole exception being client codes, or for example, "117 I'll be out at 321 on foot" My competition doesn't need to know where I am. But that's just my thought. Besides in Oregon it isn't illegal to scan anyone ('cept cell phones and home phones etc), the only exception is if you did so for financial gain. Or, used it o find out who has who for clients and then went and poached them... Then of course YOU would have to proove they did, so just keep 'em in the dark as long as possible.

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  • Central
    replied
    I agree, keeping in plain speech is safer but for really hostile/dangerous or you feel uncomfortable use these codes from the website for important stuff and everything else can be in speech.


    When talking to dispatch always first provide Unit number followed b location if you havnt already done that when leaving your vehicle in the first place (but you should always do that)


    example. Unit 11 *code*


    Code 3 Emergency
    10-15 Prisoner in Custody
    10-23 Stand By
    10-97 Arrived At Scene
    11-42 Paramedic Required (E M T)
    11-98 Officer Requires Help, Emergency
    10-4 Acknowledgement
    10-6 Busy, stand-by
    10-7X Out on portable
    10-32 Man with gun
    10-67 Person yelling for help
    10-71 Shooting
    10-72 Knifing
    Code 4 No further assistance

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by ACP01
    Three things that just about all people do in their native language...
    When reacting to stress
    When having sex
    and cursing

    These are all baseline mental functions which takes VERY intense training to overcome. These are deep cover operatives nightmares.

    When you talk about using codes and have been trained by departments using two differant codes most wil revert to the earlier codes because thay are ingrained deeper.

    When my FD dropped codes I still would throw one out during a tough call as did most others.
    I've streamed codes during SHTF situations myself, even after my previous employer dropped codes. It was also used as a "secret language" that only old-timers knew.

    Leave a comment:


  • ACP01
    replied
    Three things that just about all people do in their native language...
    When reacting to stress
    When having sex
    and cursing

    These are all baseline mental functions which takes VERY intense training to overcome. These are deep cover operatives nightmares.

    When you talk about using codes and have been trained by departments using two differant codes most wil revert to the earlier codes because thay are ingrained deeper.

    When my FD dropped codes I still would throw one out during a tough call as did most others.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Mall Director
    What about Russian? LOL.. when my assistant gets going, its "nif nif nif".. I give him a hard way to go over that, LOL!
    Then pray someone knows Russian.

    Leave a comment:

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