Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

2 Way Radio Terminology

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 2 Way Radio Terminology

    Hi all, new here and to the security officer role!!!
    I was interested in finding out the 2 way radio terminology, and meanings. i.e. Roger, out, standby, etc.

    Cheers guys!!
    You must accept that somedays you will be the pigeon and somedays you will be the statue!!

  • #2
    Here is a link to a site that lists all the radio codes used in the US and Canada. Keep in mind that 10-codes vary from state to state and department to department. What 10-22 means to one department may mean something totally different to another department.

    http://www.bearcat1.com/radioca.htm

    Do they use 10-codes in the UK?

    Comment


    • #3
      I dislike using codes, except in sensitive situations to minimize panic or to avoid tipping off a wrongdoer. Anytime you use codes, you are speaking in a different "language" susceptible to misunderstandings and memory recall difficulties w/ some officers. Just my opinion, but I'm not alone regarding this position.
      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Mr. Security
        I dislike using codes, except in sensitive situations to minimize panic or to avoid tipping off a wrongdoer. Anytime you use codes, you are speaking in a different "language" susceptible to misunderstandings and memory recall difficulties w/ some officers. Just my opinion, but I'm not alone regarding this position.
        I second that opinion Mr Security.
        "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by aka Bull
          I second that opinion Mr Security.
          Thanks!
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

          Comment


          • #6
            The National Incident Management System (NIMS) and its forerunners ALL did away with Codes of any type.

            One agencies 10-22 is anothers 10-12.

            Put what you have to say into clear, consice words that everyone can hear and understand.
            I don't want someone standing there scratching their head from my
            "Unit 01 has a 10-17 in progress with a suspect holding a 10-26" (Fill in your codes) when what I have is "and armed robbery in progress, Fully automatic shots fired with a suspect holding an AK-47"

            Comment


            • #7
              "Unit 01 has a 10-17 in progress with a suspect holding a 10-26" means that there is a unit out for fuel with a suspect holding a clear background.
              Robert
              Here endith the lesson

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Arff312
                "Unit 01 has a 10-17 in progress with a suspect holding a 10-26" means that there is a unit out for fuel with a suspect holding a clear background.
                Sounds like a fairly dangerous individual there! LOL

                Comment


                • #9
                  We don't use 10 codes on our radios. No need for them. As stated in another post, NIMS recommends Plain Speech at all times.
                  Hospital Security Officer

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Due to the fact that so much occurs in such a short period of time, and so many Officers radioing dispatch, running subject checks, response calls, and who knows what else, using a 10 code could keep issues sensative. But finding that during the heat of a moment, trying to remember a code to give a location can cost in many ways. So to button down on sensative transmissions, earpieces were purchased. Now, unless you are using a scanner, which most violators do not carry on themselves, hearing whats being said back to an officer about anything, is gone. We still use base codes, which there are less than 10 of them, as to keep a subject from knowing a check is being done, or results. But other than that, its radio away time!
                    Deputy Sheriff

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We use plain American English on radios. Those in congested areas use earbuds and either lapel or regular mics.

                      If you use codes yours may not agree with another responding agencies and can cause very serious problems. (out of gas/clean record )

                      As was stated earlier NIMS requires no code use. As happened on 9-11 multiple agencies responded to NYC from all over the country. There were USAR from California, Florida and everywhere in between. \

                      The original Incident Command System (ICS) was put together because units responding to large area forest fires could not communicate due to differant codes and terminology. Thus a standardised way of communicating was introduced.

                      You MUST communicate what is happening and what needs to be done whether it is on-site, in an area, city, county, state or national level.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I hate to say it, but ICS and NMIS reasons for plain English have no real bearing on security company communications. Agencies who use NMIS won't communicate with private security organizations on their radio frequencies (other than to possibly jam them during an incident containment) or will security companies really communicate with public agencies on public agency radio systems.

                        If you get access to public agency radio, you'll use their ten codes.

                        Honestly, we can talk how we want on our radios, because we're the only system user.
                        Some Kind of Commando Leader

                        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          True, you could use Klingon as long as EVERYONE understands Klingon in a st essfull situation.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ACP01
                            True, you could use Klingon as long as EVERYONE understands Klingon in a st essfull situation.
                            I don't think drilling Klingonese words into someone's head is really any different than numbers and letter combinations.

                            Under extremely stressful situations, some people may revert to their first language. If it isn't English, I hope its Spanish and there's someone else who can translate on the radio.
                            Some Kind of Commando Leader

                            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              In Montreal besides codes they use French on the air. And yes, I can confirm that in a stressfull situation people sometimes revert to their native language. Like me their are Quebecers whose native language is English. Somewhere between 10 & 20% of the Montreal Police are "Anglophones". About 15 years ago I cop I knew was in her cruiser in the middle of a downtown park getting shot. I had my scanner on. Her crys for help were in English even though it was "forbidden".
                              I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                              Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                              Comment

                              Leaderboard

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X