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  • Overseas security work.

    Hello,

    I am interested in overseas security work. I have found alot of jobs that entail unarmed work, I have 3 years experienced armed. I've worked for a DoD contractor for a year and have done several assignments. Is it possible to obtain a armed position without the experience of being in the military or law enforcement?. For most PSD or convoy operations, the reoccurring answer seems to be " no". I am more interested in a static position, such as a compound guard. Which appears im capable of doing.
    Last edited by Gshock; 03-28-2012, 07:50 PM.

  • #2
    What kind of security jobs have you found that are unarmed overseas?

    Yes it's possible, but it's becoming more and very competitive due to the fact the gold rush in Iraq has ended and you have several experienced guys competing against you. Not only that, but lots of jobs overseas sometimes pay less than what you can make domestically.

    To increase your odds of getting a job overseas, and a good paying one, I would suggest that you get a top secret clearance with a polygraph and your paramedic license. Take lots of training courses from reputable training facilities, and do some executive protection stateside. Another option you have is to go into law enforcement with a large department for five years, and apply for the CivPol criminal justice mentor program which is administered by a private contracting company.

    Good luck!
    sigpic

    "Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil" - Doug Patton

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    • #3
      Originally posted by tanko View Post
      What kind of security jobs have you found that are unarmed overseas?

      Yes it's possible, but it's becoming more and very competitive due to the fact the gold rush in Iraq has ended and you have several experienced guys competing against you. Not only that, but lots of jobs overseas sometimes pay less than what you can make domestically.

      To increase your odds of getting a job overseas, and a good paying one, I would suggest that you get a top secret clearance with a polygraph and your paramedic license. Take lots of training courses from reputable training facilities, and do some executive protection stateside. Another option you have is to go into law enforcement with a large department for five years, and apply for the CivPol criminal justice mentor program which is administered by a private contracting company.

      Good luck!
      http://www.dyncorprecruiting.com/ext...?dynBLUFN64261

      I also found a armed job, but It requires 3 years of experience in the private sector +personal protection (1 year) which I don't have.
      Last edited by Gshock; 03-29-2012, 02:15 AM.

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      • #4
        Serve as a deterrent unarmed, in Afghanistan....
        Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

        THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Gshock View Post
          http://www.dyncorprecruiting.com/ext...?dynBLUFN64261

          I also found a armed job, but It requires 3 years of experience in the private sector +personal protection (1 year) which I don't have.
          This job mentions nothing about three years of experience in the private sector, but does mention you need two years experience as a military police officer. If you have enough experience, a security clearance, overseas experience it's easy to get these jobs if you can play the waiting game and take a pay hit.

          Some of their security jobs, like in Kosovo pay $38,000 a year working 8 hour days, 6 six days a week. The only thing that makes it attractive is being tax free and your expenses are covered. Just be careful, because some of these companies at certain sites will really screw you over - if you don't believe me research Dyncorp in Qatar.

          Originally posted by zm88 View Post
          Serve as a deterrent unarmed, in Afghanistan....
          These jobs are usually to enforce the rules in the camps, generally you're looking for contraband in the trailers (alcohol and adult literature [the system banned a certain word]), and escorting people inside the base that are uncleared. Generally, you're escorting local workers to prevent them from stealing classified documents or sabotage.

          I agree with you, unarmed work in a war zone is not to great. A couple of years ago I was offered an unarmed job to monitor construction work outside a secured area in Afghanistan for $16.00. I thought it was a sick joke at first when they were interviewing me on the phone.
          sigpic

          "Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil" - Doug Patton

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          • #6
            Then there's the other end of the spectrum. I have a relative who worked for a year in Iraq, doing unarmed security, for $280K for the year - housing and meals paid for.
            Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
            CoAuthor - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Curtis Baillie View Post
              Then there's the other end of the spectrum. I have a relative who worked for a year in Iraq, doing unarmed security, for $280K for the year - housing and meals paid for.
              Lucky, but then again he probably was more than qualified.

              Was this at the height of the contracting period? What kind of a security position was it, management, logistics, recruiting, training?
              sigpic

              "Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil" - Doug Patton

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tanko View Post
                This job mentions nothing about three years of experience in the private sector, but does mention you need two years experience as a military police officer. If you have enough experience, a security clearance, overseas experience it's easy to get these jobs if you can play the waiting game and take a pay hit.

                Some of their security jobs, like in Kosovo pay $38,000 a year working 8 hour days, 6 six days a week. The only thing that makes it attractive is being tax free and your expenses are covered. Just be careful, because some of these companies at certain sites will really screw you over - if you don't believe me research Dyncorp in Qatar.



                These jobs are usually to enforce the rules in the camps, generally you're looking for contraband in the trailers (alcohol and adult literature [the system banned a certain word]), and escorting people inside the base that are uncleared. Generally, you're escorting local workers to prevent them from stealing classified documents or sabotage.

                I agree with you, unarmed work in a war zone is not to great. A couple of years ago I was offered an unarmed job to monitor construction work outside a secured area in Afghanistan for $16.00. I thought it was a sick joke at first when they were interviewing me on the phone.
                If it unarmed like you say and more regulation enforcement, I can deal with that. But if it would be foolish from security/operation standpoint to pull gate duty without a weapon. Some people say going there is suicide without a weapon, what they fail to realize is there's plenty of non combat troops at these bases who never use their weapons the whole deployment.

                My friend in the Army told me that they use Ugandans pull gate duty on some posts in Afghanistan, I wonder their training and experience is? He told he's always iffy about their capabilities.




                I have heard of the Camp Bondsteel in Kosovo like you said. And Qatar those are older contracts from a few years back, not sure which remain active. Hell, I was looking into CSA Kuwait,until I found out that got charged with embezzlement and fraud charges and Triple Canopy took over. I heard of Dyncorp holding passports and not allowing you to leave etc..

                That being said the security industry in California, has taken a major hit. Not in the executive protection sector, but patrol and other contracts like transit. Everyone is becoming cutthroat and underbidding making the wages unbearable, which is why I am considering overseas work.
                Last edited by Gshock; 03-29-2012, 03:50 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tanko View Post
                  Lucky, but then again he probably was more than qualified.

                  Was this at the height of the contracting period? What kind of a security position was it, management, logistics, recruiting, training?
                  It was a management position.
                  Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                  CoAuthor - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

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                  • #10
                    Generally unarmed (from what I've seen) is, as stated, monitoring. One guy I knew was a cook in the kitchen, his real job I inferred was to make sure the locals didn't add anything to the food. They preferred ex-military, probably because they know the routines on a base, have already had a clearance before, etc.

                    I knew of one position where you were the guard (for 80K a year) at a food depot in Afghanistan. The job did not specifically require military experience, however, you had to have a current M-60 rating. Fortunately (or unfortunately) I've never had a security position requiring me to carry or man something that big. Oh well...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Gshock View Post
                      If it unarmed like you say and more regulation enforcement, I can deal with that. But if it would be foolish from security/operation standpoint to pull gate duty without a weapon. Some people say going there is suicide without a weapon, what they fail to realize is there's plenty of non combat troops at these bases who never use their weapons the whole deployment.
                      Generally, it's enforcing regulations and has nothing to do with armed protection. It wouldn't be a bad job if you could move up but as previously stated, it's going to be difficult considering the large amounts of former contractors who've already established a reputation. I would agree with you about doing something high risk unarmed is not smart.

                      Originally posted by Gshock View Post
                      My friend in the Army told me that they use Ugandans pull gate duty on some posts in Afghanistan, I wonder their training and experience is? He told he's always iffy about their capabilities.
                      Those third country contractors work for a company called SOC-SMG. Obviously they are hired to save money by paying more than their local economy pays, but it's still cheaper for the United States. They are suppose to be ex-military but that doesn't always hold true. There have been some incidents where they fall asleep, steal or lie but that can happen regardless of what nationality they are. When they are caught, there is either a reduce in pay or they're sent home and blacklisted from contract work and SOC-SMG doesn't screw around.

                      Originally posted by Gshock View Post
                      I have heard of the Camp Bondsteel in Kosovo like you said. And Qatar those are older contracts from a few years back, not sure which remain active. Hell, I was looking into CSA Kuwait,until I found out that got charged with embezzlement and fraud charges and Triple Canopy took over. I heard of Dyncorp holding passports and not allowing you to leave etc..
                      Camp Bondsteel is still active, but just changed from ITT Systems providing the security to Dyncorp. Dyncorp won the contract because they're paying $38,000 vs. $65,000. Just be careful and go with both or your eyes open for the long haul with a backup plan.

                      Originally posted by Gshock View Post
                      That being said the security industry in California, has taken a major hit. Not in the executive protection sector, but patrol and other contracts like transit. Everyone is becoming cutthroat and underbidding making the wages unbearable, which is why I am considering overseas work.
                      Maybe you should try executive protection? It may be something that can pay well, and give you the experience to get into overseas work. Is there a lot of entry level work in California for executive protection after some training? Just curious.
                      sigpic

                      "Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil" - Doug Patton

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