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  • Hospital Security Question

    Hey. 1st of all, I found my log in info (keep losing it).

    I am leaving an Industrial Fire / Security job in favor of a 3rd Shift Hospital spot. The Hospital will be a new environment, I've never worked in one before. Any suggestions / advice / warnings? Thanks a bunch!

    P.S. Unarmed except for Baton, Spray, and cuffs....
    "What if this is as good as it gets?" ~ Melvin Udall

  • #2
    Hospital Security Question

    http://www.iahss.org/Certification/Default.asp

    You could take a look at the URL above and see if it is anything that might be worthwhile for you. I haven't taken it, so I really can't comment one way or the other. I would find out what your policies are, so you know what is expected of you. Get to know staff and offer to escort staff to their vehicles, if this is permitted. Carry a cell phone with you as a back up to the radio system. Carry a pocket notebook and pen. Again, if this is permitted, some hospital security departments will monitor local public safety radio communications so they have a certain level of situational awareness. Say, for example, there is an incident nearby that will likely result in activity for your hospital. It can be helpful to know this ahead of time to alert staff and prepare. If they allow you to take First Responder or Emergency Medical Technician training, it might be worth checking out. Get ALL of your shots, like Hepatitis B, etc. Learn as much as you can about Blood Borne Pathogens. Glove up early and often. There are different sizes and specialities of hospitals, so learn as much as you can about what goes in in the different wards. If they have a psychiatric unit, be particularly careful around patients that are alleged to be mentally ill and/or chemicially dependent. Actually, even if you don't have a psychiatric unit, you will probably still deal with those types of patients. HIPAA is a huge deal, so find out how it will affect you.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Jim. They have already told me the job will require hands-on with Mental Evaluations / Intoxicated patients. I am scheduled to get the Hep vaccine soon. I learned a lot regarding blood borne hazards while working in Corrections. Gloves, gloves, gloves. lol. I'm looking forward to the position. 3rd shift should be interesting.
      "What if this is as good as it gets?" ~ Melvin Udall

      Comment


      • #4
        I've worked in Hospital Security for 4 years now. You will spend a good amount of time in the ER with the psych/drunk patients.

        Comment


        • #5
          I've grown so used to guarding Netflix at a "don't let let the place burn down" site. I'm really looking forward to being active again, but have got to get in better shape.
          "What if this is as good as it gets?" ~ Melvin Udall

          Comment


          • #6
            There are several posts on this forum about hospital security.

            I've worked hospital security for a few years, and the above posting about dealing with mentally disturbed and intoxicated people holds true. If your hospital has a chapel in it, you will get transients that think they can sleep in the chapel.

            My one piece of advice is don't believe what staff will tell you about someone being on a two-physician hold. Make sure to always see the paperwork before doing anything. I've seen former security officers get in serious trouble for simply taking the word of a front desk clerk or a nurse.
            sigpic

            "Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil" - Doug Patton

            Comment


            • #7
              Tanko is referring to a hold a physician can place on a patient if they feel the patient is a threat to themselves or others. Basically if a physician feels a patient is not able to make good decisions the patient will be held against their will in the hospital or transferred to a psych hospital until they are deemed fit to be released. Here in GA it's called a 10-13 in CA I believe it's a 5150.

              These patients also must have someone outside their room 24/7. At my hospital we are used as sitters and a good deal of our time is used watching these patients.

              So even when they are not violent or aggressive we spend a lot of time with these patients.

              But we do other things besides working with psych patients.

              Like:

              Secure patient valuables.
              Relieve the operator as needed.
              Transport deceased patients to the morgue.

              And the usual Security stuff like patrols, escorts, and unlocks.

              Comment


              • #8
                No Charges In Death Of Buffalo Hospital Patient

                Ironically, one of my local TV stations just did a segment last night about a patient that died at the hospital while being restrained! If I recall correctly from the news segment, the security guard was fired, but he was not charged criminally by the Wright County Attorneys Office.

                http://www.kare11.com/news/article/9...spital-patient

                BUFFALO, Minn. - Mary Zirbes never went a day without hugging her son. But on the night of October 2nd, 2011, she did it for the last time.

                "I gave him a hug and he left with the sheriff and that was the last time I saw him alive," said Zirbes.

                Her son, 23-year old Nicholas Zirbes died at the Buffalo Hospital after investigators say employees restrained him to the ground and he went into cardiac arrest.

                That night, Zirbes who lived with his mother had been drinking and was having suicidal thoughts, according to his mom.

                So they called the sheriff's department who took him to the hospital for observation.

                "The one time we called for help and it ended so horrible," she said.

                Zirbes wants the hospital employees held criminally responsible, but that will not happen.

                That's because Wright County Attorney Tom Kelly decided not to file criminal charges last week against the security guard or the male nurse who he says restrained Zirbes with his stomach facing down after he became agitated and angry.

                He says the death should never have happened and employees could have used other ways to subdue Zirbes.

                But Kelly says he watched the 30-minute surveillance video of the incident, which he believes doesn't prove the hospital employees knowingly committed a crime.

                "I never once saw any gratuitous use of excessive force," he said.

                But according to an Allina Hospital document obtained by KARE 11, the hospital fired the security guard shortly after the October incident because he used, "excessive force" that "directly contradicts (his) training".

                "What they have to prove to discharge an employee and what I have to do to prove in order charge a citizen are apples and oranges," said Kelly.

                But Zirbes wonders why Kelly didn't file criminal charges when the medical examiner ruled the death a homicide, stating the cause was "cardiopulmonary arrest complicating restraint and subdual."

                The medical examiner, however also listed Zerbis' enlarged heart and the fact he was overweight as contributing factors which is why Kelly says the word "homicide" is misleading.

                "What I've learned from all of this is just prepare for the worst," said Zirbes.

                Despite that, Zirbes will continue to speak out for her son, hoping someone will be held accountable.

                "It was a senseless passing that should not have happened to anybody," she said.

                Although the security guard is no longer employed at the Buffalo Hospital, officials say the nurse is still employed there.

                Allina Hospital and Clinics spokesperson David Kanihan would not comment about that, only releasing this statement:

                "While state and federal laws prevent us from publicly discussing the specifics of this case, we have reached out to the family to express our sympathies for their loss. We will continue to communicate privately with the family in a compassionate and forthright manner."

                We are not naming the security guard because he was not charged with a crime.

                Through his attorney, he released this statement:

                "The death of the patient was a needless tragedy that occurred despite the care (my client) took to protect hospital staff and the patient from himself. The Wright County Attorney and Sheriff conducted a thorough investigation into the case including interviewing numerous witnesses, reviewing the hospital videotape of the episode, and reviewing medical records. Their conclusion was that (my client) did not violate the law but relied upon the medical staff (including a physician) who were present the entire time "to look after the well-being" of the patient. The County Attorney further concluded that restraint was but one of "several significant conditions" that played a part in the cardiopulmonary arrest of the patient including cardiomegaly, arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease, obesity, and acute alcohol intoxication."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Another thing I forgot to add is be really careful about watching any patient without medical staff present. The last thing you need is to be watching a patient that has a medical condition that wasn't communicated to you, and require immediate medical attention that you're not qualified to treat. Just make sure to fall back on your hospital policies, document everything, and make sure others know if you're instructed by hospital staff.
                  sigpic

                  "Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil" - Doug Patton

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    While I know everyone winds up watching a patient at one time or another, it's definitely not a good idea.

                    The limit of a security guard's capability with potentially psychotic patients ends literally at calling to a specialist (nurse, doctor, etc) if anything happens. Even through conversation, a security guard is not a psychiatric nurse or a psychologist; even regular conversation could be harmful to some patients.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've worked security at a level 1 trauma center for 10 years, and I've been a trainer there for 7 years.

                      Originally posted by tanko View Post
                      There are several posts on this forum about hospital security.

                      I've worked hospital security for a few years, and the above posting about dealing with mentally disturbed and intoxicated people holds true. If your hospital has a chapel in it, you will get transients that think they can sleep in the chapel.

                      My one piece of advice is don't believe what staff will tell you about someone being on a two-physician hold. Make sure to always see the paperwork before doing anything. I've seen former security officers get in serious trouble for simply taking the word of a front desk clerk or a nurse.
                      I would argue to do whatever the nurse tells you to do, just articulate it well in your report. But only do what a nurse or doctor tell you. Never a HUC or nursing assistant. But also go with what your policies state. I rarely see the paper holds. I don't need to. As long as the nurse or doctor say they are on a hold, that's good enough, like I said though, just articulate it.


                      Originally posted by Nauticus View Post
                      While I know everyone winds up watching a patient at one time or another, it's definitely not a good idea.

                      The limit of a security guard's capability with potentially psychotic patients ends literally at calling to a specialist (nurse, doctor, etc) if anything happens. Even through conversation, a security guard is not a psychiatric nurse or a psychologist; even regular conversation could be harmful to some patients.
                      That all depends on the individual hospitals policies. Not all are the same.
                      Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tanko View Post
                        There are several posts on this forum about hospital security.

                        I've worked hospital security for a few years, and the above posting about dealing with mentally disturbed and intoxicated people holds true. If your hospital has a chapel in it, you will get transients that think they can sleep in the chapel.

                        My one piece of advice is don't believe what staff will tell you about someone being on a two-physician hold. Make sure to always see the paperwork before doing anything. I've seen former security officers get in serious trouble for simply taking the word of a front desk clerk or a nurse.
                        10 years, and I've only found 1 transient sleeping in our chapel.
                        Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Patrickmad View Post
                          Tanko is referring to a hold a physician can place on a patient if they feel the patient is a threat to themselves or others. Basically if a physician feels a patient is not able to make good decisions the patient will be held against their will in the hospital or transferred to a psych hospital until they are deemed fit to be released. Here in GA it's called a 10-13 in CA I believe it's a 5150.

                          These patients also must have someone outside their room 24/7. At my hospital we are used as sitters and a good deal of our time is used watching these patients.

                          So even when they are not violent or aggressive we spend a lot of time with these patients.

                          But we do other things besides working with psych patients.

                          Like:

                          Secure patient valuables.
                          Relieve the operator as needed.
                          Transport deceased patients to the morgue.

                          And the usual Security stuff like patrols, escorts, and unlocks.
                          In Minnesota, it's called either a "Transportation Hold" or a "72 Hour Hold." Luckilly, at my hospital we are not used to babysit patients. If they are on a hold, in a secured area, and cooperative, we don't really have any involvement with them after searching them and their belongings.

                          If they are in an unsecured area, but cooperative, a nursing assistant will be used as a "one to one" (babysitter). Secured area or not, if they are uncooperative, threatening to leave, or combative, then security gets called to restrain them. Then we leave and the nurse has to check on them and chart on their condition every 15 minutes.
                          Last edited by sgtnewby; 03-26-2012, 02:47 PM.
                          Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sgtnewby View Post
                            I've worked security at a level 1 trauma center for 10 years, and I've been a trainer there for 7 years.

                            I would argue to do whatever the nurse tells you to do, just articulate it well in your report. But only do what a nurse or doctor tell you. Never a HUC or nursing assistant. But also go with what your policies state. I rarely see the paper holds. I don't need to. As long as the nurse or doctor say they are on a hold, that's good enough, like I said though, just articulate it.

                            That all depends on the individual hospitals policies. Not all are the same.
                            In my experience staff can be very vague in what they want, coming across as an order and not a request but when it doesn't go the way they want they blame the security officer. Depending on the state laws you could have you license revoked and charged with kidnapping if you restrict someones movement.

                            Originally posted by sgtnewby View Post
                            10 years, and I've only found 1 transient sleeping in our chapel.
                            Lucky you. I'm jealous! I was always surprised how many would come in, leave after we instructed them to leave only to return five minutes later.

                            Originally posted by sgtnewby View Post
                            In Minnesota, it's called either a "Transportation Hold" or a "72 Hour Hold." Luckilly, at my hospital we are not used to babysit patients. If they are on a hold, in a secured area, and cooperative, we don't really have any involvement with them after searching them and their belongings.

                            If they are in an unsecured area, but cooperative, a nursing assistant will be used as a "one to one" (babysitter). Secured area or not, if they are uncooperative, threatening to leave, or combative, then security gets called to restrain them. Then we leave and the nurse has to check on them and chart on their condition every 15 minutes.
                            You get paid good money, have good benefits, and a good working environment. Can I please work for you guys?
                            sigpic

                            "Great danger lies in the notion that we can reason with evil" - Doug Patton

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Congrads on the new job. Hospital Security is one of the most challenging and rewarding security positions available. One of my key pieces of advice is this: unless there is an immediate threat to someones well being there is NO REASON to ever enter a patients room without a RN present. That patient is the nurses responsibiity and they are obligated to assit you with that patients care. I learned this lesson the hard way and now I will not be left alone in a patients room with out at minimum another security officer or ideally a RN presnet. If the RN leaves the room I step outside and moniter from doorway. Just my experience, also what my Director has requested we do as well.

                              Comment

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