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  • ACP01
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackhole
    I've heard the same thing when asking why revolvers were being used vs. semi-automatics.
    When a revolver DOES jam/malfuntion then you are in a world of trouble as most jams are jamed cylinders not un-jammable in the field.

    Most jams/malfuntions with an automatic are tho. Usually they are stove-pipes, unseated mags or slides, failure to fire, or even just the safety left on. Unless it is a double-feed they are usually easily managed via Slap-Rack_and Bang drills or variants. (or disengaging the safety) Even the double-feed can usually be remedied by ripping the mag out mag and the above drill.

    I have carried both but like autos better.

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  • dla4122
    replied
    My trusty weapon

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    The jamming issue is that the revolver may be fired on any axis at any rotation, whereas the semi-automatic generally must be fired upright.

    This is what amuses me, though, and why I think the 9mm restriction as well as the old revolver only restriction is silly:

    Critics question whether better firepower is necessary. "The guns are just too fast-acting and in the hands of people who have minimal training," said state Sen. Gwen Margolis, D-Miami Beach, who was one of only two lawmakers to oppose the bill. "It just didn't seem right to me."
    "Minimal training?" How about the Florida Concealed Weapons Permit "course" that until 2004 only required the basic study of deadly force laws, and no range time. Number of hours to complete a Florida CCW course? 4 hours. Now you have to qualify on a range, I believe, but you still may not have to, its a weapon not a pistol permit. I know people who have carried swords on their CCW permits.

    On a FL CCW, you may carry any weapon of any caliber, including fully automatic weapons if you have the proper documentation to own one, or suppressed or short-barreled.

    The "minimal training" the security "guard" gets is 28 hours worth of instruction on the firearm, a full "police-style" range qualification course of fire, and instruction on the deadly force laws of the State of Florida.

    The best example is the officer going to, being at, and coming home from work.

    A security officer has a CCW. Before going to work, the security officer may lawfully carry a Desert Eagle .50 Caliber Pistol on their person via the CCW. They may go anywhere they like that is not on the restricted list. That's usually schools, bars, etc. The moment they get to work, they have to remove the concealed .50 caliber pistol and strap on their .38 caliber revolver, wearing it openly. When they leave work, they must remove their .38 caliber weapon from plain view, and may put the .50 caliber pistol back on.

    So, why does the security officer get to carry a .50 caliber hand cannon when not at work, but only a .38 (or a 9mm pistol) while at work?
    Last edited by N. A. Corbier; 07-27-2006, 08:13 PM.

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  • T202
    replied
    A dirty firearm is the main reason for malfunctions in both revolvers and semi-autos.

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  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Some may disagree, but I have been informed that the revolver is less likely to jam as well.
    I've heard the same thing when asking why revolvers were being used vs. semi-automatics.

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  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by histfan71
    The problem I have with revolvers not with the weapon itself, but the bullets most security guards are restricted to.

    It is usually the .38, which IMHO is not an effective stopping round. However, I think that the .357 and .44 are effective, but most states will not allow you to carry those calibers. California is the only state I know of that will allow you to carry both of those calibers.
    Texas allows security to carry both of those calibers as long as the person carrying them qualified with the larger of the two calibers at the range. The commission card, however, only has SA or NSA printed on it, meaning semiautomatic or non-semiautomatic. I used to carry a .357. It had tremendous stopping power, but the problems I had with it were it was too heavy to tote around and it rusted too easily.

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  • Mall Director
    replied
    Well, I guess if you have to send alot of rounds down range, then kudos to him!

    My preferance is the automatic, as I am quite familiar with them, and reloading is champ and quick!

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    The problem I have with revolvers not with the weapon itself, but the bullets most security guards are restricted to.

    It is usually the .38, which IMHO is not an effective stopping round. However, I think that the .357 and .44 are effective, but most states will not allow you to carry those calibers. California is the only state I know of that will allow you to carry both of those calibers.

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Unless the site is a high-security/high-risk one, the revolver seems adequate to me. Some may disagree, but I have been informed that the revolver is less likely to jam as well. Having a limited number of rounds encourages accuracy and restraint too. A minority opinion perhaps. (Hey; someone has to take the minority position... )

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  • dhcp
    started a topic Old.. but interesting..

    Old.. but interesting..

    http://www.sptimes.com/2005/05/27/St...ity_offi.shtml

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