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DOE Nuclear Security: Who Can Take These Contracts?

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  • DOE Nuclear Security: Who Can Take These Contracts?

    SIW recently ran an article on how the DOE audit showed a defficiency in DOE Nuclear Security. One of the companies mentioned was Wackenhut Government Services, which provides private federal law enforcement officers for government contracts such as DOE, DOD, US Army, etc.

    With DOE contracts so specialized, with such logistical issues as having limited law enforcement powers, responsibity for security of sterile areas, automatic weapons, and the rest of it...

    How many contractors in the nation can successfully qualify and compete for these contracts? And, of those, how many can provide the calibre, for lack of a better term, of employee to work these sites?

    The work is monotnous, just like other security work. The only difference is that there are red and blue lights on your truck, you have some federal arrest powers, and you carry an M4A3 when at work.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

  • #2
    Well, I don't know if it's the same way across the nation, but in my area (Pacific NW) it's actually the SMALLER companies that handle these accounts. Wackenhut, Securitas, etc have lost these, because they simply don't have the stringent requirements of their Officers, to put people mature and qualified enough in these posts. The local nuclear plant is patrolled by a company that's local just to this area, and the same goes for a lot of the local govt. contracts.
    When I was a patrol supervisor, our manager had a theory on security companies, that sure seems to hold true, in our area at least: Keep the company small, so you can personally be involved in the hiring of each and every Officer. Once you expand to the point where you can't do that, you're forced to accept new hires based on other people's opinions, who don't necessarily have the same views/ideas as you. It's my opinion that this has been the downfall of larger companies like the ones I mentioned.
    Granted, this means the owner doesn't necessariily become a multi-millionaire via the company's profits, but at least the company stays professional, and keeps it's image/reputation.

    //.02 cents
    Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
    Originally posted by ValleyOne
    BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
    Shoulda called in sick.
    Be safe!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Bridgegate
      Well, I don't know if it's the same way across the nation, but in my area (Pacific NW) it's actually the SMALLER companies that handle these accounts. Wackenhut, Securitas, etc have lost these, because they simply don't have the stringent requirements of their Officers, to put people mature and qualified enough in these posts. The local nuclear plant is patrolled by a company that's local just to this area, and the same goes for a lot of the local govt. contracts.
      When I was a patrol supervisor, our manager had a theory on security companies, that sure seems to hold true, in our area at least: Keep the company small, so you can personally be involved in the hiring of each and every Officer. Once you expand to the point where you can't do that, you're forced to accept new hires based on other people's opinions, who don't necessarily have the same views/ideas as you. It's my opinion that this has been the downfall of larger companies like the ones I mentioned.
      Granted, this means the owner doesn't necessariily become a multi-millionaire via the company's profits, but at least the company stays professional, and keeps it's image/reputation.

      //.02 cents
      I'd rather be small, have one or two trusted office staff and field supervisors, and have my reputation, than be big, and known by all as the head of a company full of idiots.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

      Comment


      • #4
        Nuclear Security

        It's interesting to note that in the UK, Nuclear Security is the responsibility of a Police Force.

        http://www.cnc.police.uk

        Comment


        • #5
          DOE Nuclear Security

          Commissionaire put his finger on a solution that was discussed in the USA. It was dismissed as we do not want a national police force. The closest thing we have to that is FBI, for federal crimes and when assistance is sought and approved by the AG. In the UK, all police forces report to one central head in London.
          The primary problem as I see it is not so much the personnel as it is the equipment they have in place, its old and needs to be upgraded. Leadership is clearly lacking in this arena, report after report is filed and only lip service is done to the problem. If ever we can end the turf wars and a clear mandate and is enforced, then, and only then, will there be a solution.
          As for the equipment, when there is a thunderstorm, is there some unwritten law, rule or regulation that mandates all the alarm lights on a console go into hard alarm? In many instances they do just that. Wiring at some facilities will support a linear world, the light bulb, electric motor or electric coil heater. All of those devices have a power factor of 1. In a non-linear world we deal with switch mode or switching power supplies. Electrical systems must be upgraded to ensure such equipment operates in a satisfactory manner, simply it operates as designed. By their own admission, power-factor correction has not been achieved.
          Enjoy the day,
          Bill

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Bill Warnock
            Commissionaire put his finger on a solution that was discussed in the USA. It was dismissed as we do not want a national police force. The closest thing we have to that is FBI, for federal crimes and when assistance is sought and approved by the AG. In the UK, all police forces report to one central head in London.
            The primary problem as I see it is not so much the personnel as it is the equipment they have in place, its old and needs to be upgraded. Leadership is clearly lacking in this arena, report after report is filed and only lip service is done to the problem. If ever we can end the turf wars and a clear mandate and is enforced, then, and only then, will there be a solution.
            As for the equipment, when there is a thunderstorm, is there some unwritten law, rule or regulation that mandates all the alarm lights on a console go into hard alarm? In many instances they do just that. Wiring at some facilities will support a linear world, the light bulb, electric motor or electric coil heater. All of those devices have a power factor of 1. In a non-linear world we deal with switch mode or switching power supplies. Electrical systems must be upgraded to ensure such equipment operates in a satisfactory manner, simply it operates as designed. By their own admission, power-factor correction has not been achieved.
            Enjoy the day,
            Bill
            Yes, yes there is. Its called the Law of Liability Gamble. The law states that you weigh the liability of having the problem uncorrected, vs. the amount of money that it costs to correct the problem. If the liability settlement is less, then don't do it.
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

            Comment


            • #7
              DOE Nuclear Security

              N.
              That sounds fine if one is starting from scratch, but what about the millions of dollars that have been given to DOE to correct these problems? The money disappeared and Congress asked where it went, and thus far DOE has not responded to the request. The most recent answer was the money may have been diverted to more pressing priorities. That answer will not wash because the money was "fenced" funding, lawfully used only for the purpose intended unless Congress grants a waiver. No waiver was given.
              Enjoy the day,
              Bill

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                N.
                That sounds fine if one is starting from scratch, but what about the millions of dollars that have been given to DOE to correct these problems? The money disappeared and Congress asked where it went, and thus far DOE has not responded to the request. The most recent answer was the money may have been diverted to more pressing priorities. That answer will not wash because the money was "fenced" funding, lawfully used only for the purpose intended unless Congress grants a waiver. No waiver was given.
                Enjoy the day,
                Bill
                Heh. You KNOW they'd flip out if we used a Homeland Security Grant for biometrics to buy body armor. (Yes, private contractors can apply for HSGs. Source: DOJ Grant Website, Chief Supply) I have a feeling they'll do some shuffling at DOE HR, then keep doing it with different names.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                Comment

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