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"Other" weapons legal, bows&arrows, knives, etc?

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  • "Other" weapons legal, bows&arrows, knives, etc?

    What about that Medieval stuff that sell at the mall? "mace"(ball w/spike-chain-handle)?

    Not asking if it is a good idea, just what the legal issues are for 'carrying' and also for 'use' against another person as 'defense'.


    No need to say "you should stick to weapons you have official approved SO training with", or other obvious helpful comments.

    Looking for legal nitty-gritty.

    On more likely note, what about 'impromptu weapons' use by SOs for defense? lumber, trash cans, lamps, 'heavy objects' like stones?

  • #2
    "Other" weapons legal, bows&arrows, knives, etc?

    I guess that depends on what part of the world you are interested in. Are you concerned about Mogadishu or the south side of Chicago? Laws do vary from place to place you know.

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    • #3
      Read your state statutes in regards to defense of self, defense of others, and defense of property.

      Then, read your state statute governing possession, import, or selling of melee weapons. I think you're in CA, which means that a lot of items are illegal to possess without "good reason," like martial arts weapons, or just plain illegal to possess.

      There you will find your answers. Most states don't care what you use to defend yourself, as long as the force is reasonable. You picked up a samurai sword because someone's invading your home and ran them through? The law doesn't see that act any different than shooting them down.

      The problems come from "how did you get close enough," "is it legal to even have one of those," and "you should have fled your home and called 911."
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #4
        Are you wanting to know if you can carry a crossbow while working? I think it depends on if your wearing a suit of armor or not... Because if you are than I believe you can but if not than it is not allowed.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
          Read your state statutes in regards to defense of self, defense of others, and defense of property.

          Then, read your state statute governing possession, import, or selling of melee weapons. I think you're in CA, which means that a lot of items are illegal to possess without "good reason," like martial arts weapons, or just plain illegal to possess.

          There you will find your answers. Most states don't care what you use to defend yourself, as long as the force is reasonable. You picked up a samurai sword because someone's invading your home and ran them through? The law doesn't see that act any different than shooting them down.

          The problems come from "how did you get close enough," "is it legal to even have one of those," and "you should have fled your home and called 911."
          The "duty to retreat" is an old common law concept that has faded over the years in favor of a "stand your ground" principle, especially in the United States. Even where a "duty to retreat" is still recognized, it is very narrowly construed. For instance, it is generally NOT applied to a person who is repelling an attack within his own dwelling (the "castle doctrine" overrides any duty to retreat), or "where the individual has a right to exercise exclusive occupancy and control". Washington State's Supreme Court put it even more broadly: "There is no duty to retreat when a person is assaulted in any place where he or she has a right to be" - in other words, anywhere that you are not trespassing, such as in any public place, a place of business, etc. It is also usually applied very rarely to an individual who is otherwise blameless in an attack (did not initiate or provoke the attack).

          The "stand your ground" principle is also recognized by Federal courts in cases where self-defense is asserted against a charge of criminal homicide, which further weakens the "duty to retreat" doctrine. Almost all states recognize the castle doctrine, either expressly in statute, in well-established case law, or tacitly as a matter of prosecutorial policy. Somewhat fewer states have actually passed "stand your ground" statutes, but a number are considering doing so.

          Fear not the "duty to retreat" gremlin, especially in defending your home, unless you live in one of the very few states where it may be applied.
          Last edited by SecTrainer; 09-18-2011, 11:54 PM.
          "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

          "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

          "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

          "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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          • #6
            This kinda makes me want to bring a bow and arrow to work...
            "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
            "The Curve" 1998

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            • #7
              Come on my US friends. Admit it. A bow & arrow is not going to cut it. You need a semi-automatic bow & arrow at the minimum
              I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
              Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Lawson View Post
                This kinda makes me want to bring a bow and arrow to work...
                Seems like some would agree with you, Lawson.

                http://news.yahoo.com/san-diego-boy-...004828380.html
                "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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                • #9
                  Any of those items used on someone here in MA will have a "to wit" in front of it for a ab/dw and depending on damage/maim a mayhem charge.
                  Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

                  THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
                    Come on my US friends. Admit it. A bow & arrow is not going to cut it. You need a semi-automatic bow & arrow at the minimum
                    For the most part, your right. But again, it depends on the laws of the individual state; some states outlaw "high-capacity quivers", limiting quiver capacity to a maximum of ten rounds. CA even requires that the quivers of some specified bows (so-called "assault bows") be sporterized or demilitarized; among other specifications, requiring be "fixed" to the weapon, regardless of quiver capacity.

                    All this, of course, can serve to limit the effectiveness of a semi-automatic bow, and render the comparative advantages of semi-auto bows somewhat moot.


                    (Satire, folks; just satire. Don't bother googling "high capacity quivers" in the CA Municipal Codes.)
                    Last edited by 5423; 09-19-2011, 12:19 PM.
                    "I'll defend with my life your right to disagree with me" - anonymous

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                    • #11
                      I would not trust any of the "weapons" sold at our local mall.

                      There is something to be said for a bola.
                      Attached Files
                      "A good deed’s like pissing yourself in dark pants. Warm feeling but no one notices." - Jacob Taylor

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 5423 View Post
                        For the most part, your right. But again, it depends on the laws of the individual state; some states outlaw "high-capacity quivers", limiting quiver capacity to a maximum of ten rounds. CA even requires that the quivers of some specified bows (so-called "assault bows") be sporterized or demilitarized; among other specifications, requiring be "fixed" to the weapon, regardless of quiver capacity.

                        All this, of course, can serve to limit the effectiveness of a semi-automatic bow, and render the comparative advantages of semi-auto bows somewhat moot.
                        I've always enjoyed archery demonstrations, although some are more, umm....shall we say interesting than others.

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9M1P1...eature=related

                        (What's that, dear? Don't be silly. I'm merely admiring her skill....)
                        Last edited by SecTrainer; 09-19-2011, 11:12 AM.
                        "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                        "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                        "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                        "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Huh. The one time I convinced The Bride to try archery, she was doing some similar manuevers... but it was unintentional.

                          Fortunately, I set the target up in front of a sheet of plywood, with the garage behind. She managed to not miss the garage, and didn't lose any arrows.
                          "I'll defend with my life your right to disagree with me" - anonymous

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by zm88 View Post
                            Any of those items used on someone here in MA will have a "to wit" in front of it for a ab/dw and depending on damage/maim a mayhem charge.
                            But if I roll a 12d and hit +10 for damage, then I get to keep my Boots of Levitation and regail full health, right?









                            “Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left”
                            "I swear to God, I'm going to pistol whip the next guy that says 'Shenanigans' "... Capt. O'Hagan, "Super Troopers"

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                            • #15
                              RE: "duty to retreat", I was asked in interview for Armed position

                              if someone was coming at me with a knife(deadly threat) and I shot them what would I say in court when asked "Why didn't you run away instead of shooting?"

                              I said "I'm not a fast runner and if I turned by back to run I would be much more vulnerable to knife attack", he said "good answer" and offered me the job.

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