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battery on a florida licensed security officer is now felony

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  • battery on a florida licensed security officer is now felony

    In a law signed by the governor effective july 1st battery is elevated to felony of the third degree if commited on a florida licensed security officer. The industry has been fighting for this for ten yrs. This shows the bad guys attacking a security officer will not be tolerated.
    Last edited by bigdog; 06-12-2006, 10:01 PM.
    "Get yourself a shovel cause your in deep Sh*t"

  • #2
    Originally posted by bigdog
    In a law signed by the governor effective july 1st battery is elevated to felony of the third degree if commited on a florida licensed security officer. The industry has been fighting for this for ten yrs. This shows the bad guys attacking a security officer will not be tolerated.

    Its about time that y'all had a law like that there.

    In Michigan assulting a security officer/guard is the same thing as assulting a police officer. The penalties are the same instant felony
    http://img363.imageshack.us/img363/3203/darrell29jc.gif

    The FUTURE is MSP...

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    • #3
      That is wonderful. Now the next battle is getting all the law enforcement jurisdictions and local prosecutors to be aware of and enforce said law.
      "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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      • #4
        No, the next battle is getting all the companies to buy new patches that meet the elements of the crime.

        Your patch must have the company name on it, and it must say "Licensed Security Officer" in mainly readable format.
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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        • #5
          Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
          No, the next battle is getting all the companies to buy new patches that meet the elements of the crime.

          Your patch must have the company name on it, and it must say "Licensed Security Officer" in mainly readable format.

          You only need that if that is specificly spelled out in the state law. If not then you don't need it.


          You don't need that here because assulting any guard in the performance of his/her duties is a felony. Irregardless of the patch or what it says.

          I have never heard a law written that way where your patch must say licensed in order for the charge to stick.
          http://img363.imageshack.us/img363/3203/darrell29jc.gif

          The FUTURE is MSP...

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          • #6
            What is battery, exactly? There's no such act in New York.

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            • #7
              I posted about this about a month ago. Here is the thread.

              http://forums.securityinfowatch.com/...hlight=battery
              My views, opinions and statements are my own. They are not of my company, affiliates or coworkers.

              -Being bagger at Publix has more respect these days

              -It's just a job kid deal with it

              -The industry needs to do one of two things; stop fiddling with the thin line and go forward or go back to that way it was. A flashlight in one hand and your set of keys in the other

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              • #8
                In states where the statutes are assault and battery in simple terms:

                assault is the threat, battery is when they actually touch you.

                In Colorado we also don't have battery. Assault covers it all.
                "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by aka Bull
                  In states where the statutes are assault and battery in simple terms:

                  assault is the threat, battery is when they actually touch you.

                  In Colorado we also don't have battery. Assault covers it all.
                  I understand now. The threat here could possibly be menacing, but probably nothing. The actual touch would be harassment or assault.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by darrell
                    You only need that if that is specificly spelled out in the state law. If not then you don't need it.


                    You don't need that here because assulting any guard in the performance of his/her duties is a felony. Irregardless of the patch or what it says.

                    I have never heard a law written that way where your patch must say licensed in order for the charge to stick.
                    Its specifically spelled out. Florida Statute 493 also requires that every licensed security officer have a patch or emblem visible at all times that indicates the agency they work for.

                    "Security" patches are illegal in this state if you're a contract agency. It must say who you work for.
                    Some Kind of Commando Leader

                    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by darrell
                      You only need that if that is specificly spelled out in the state law. If not then you don't need it.


                      You don't need that here because assulting any guard in the performance of his/her duties is a felony. Irregardless of the patch or what it says.

                      I have never heard a law written that way where your patch must say licensed in order for the charge to stick.
                      Its specifically spelled out. Florida Statute 493 also requires that every licensed security officer have a patch or emblem visible at all times that indicates the agency they work for.

                      "Security" patches are illegal in this state if you're a contract agency. It must say who you work for.

                      This also covers contract and proprietary armed security officers who posess a Class D license. Not a Class D officer? You are not a licensed security officer, and are a simple citizen.
                      Some Kind of Commando Leader

                      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                        Its specifically spelled out. Florida Statute 493 also requires that every licensed security officer have a patch or emblem visible at all times that indicates the agency they work for.

                        "Security" patches are illegal in this state if you're a contract agency. It must say who you work for.

                        This also covers contract and proprietary armed security officers who posess a Class D license. Not a Class D officer? You are not a licensed security officer, and are a simple citizen.
                        Texas also has a similar issue with certain requirements. In order for an assault (same as battery here) to be an enhanceable offense, it has to be committed on a security officer wearing a distinctive uniform, whether licensed to be armed or not. There is a requirement that we have a patch on the left sleeve of the uniform shirt that has the company's registered name and logo and somewhere on the uniform the word "security" must be clearly printed. A violation of the patch is an administrative violation. I don't think a patch violation would nullify an enhanced assault charge, as long as the suspect was aware of the complainant's status as security. Generally our companies do comply with that standard though.
                        "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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