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  • Qarlo X64
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer
    If indeed this officer does indeed conduct himself and approach his job in the serious, thoughtful manner he describes here, he is not only to be commended...he is to be emulated, and I'd take a dozen just like him.
    Yeah I do indeed conduct myself as described, and thanks for the compliments BTW. I honestly must say that it has more to do with the fact I was raised old school military and of a very law abiding family, with (2) uncles that are State Troopers. One deceased as of 1990 who was CHIP, and another still alive who runs all of the state of Ohio. I only wish there were more people in positions of authority (or clients even) that would have the same positive attitude towards me and others like me in the Private Security field and pay me at the rate of pay respectively, as well as trust me enough to have full range of "operations". But that usually isn't the case at all, I dunno... sometimes I think it's the state of Texas that might be the problem but I could be wrong. Hopefully all will go well with me getting into a Police department in the near future though, as that's what I'm pushing for. But a lot of the guys I'm friends with locally who are LEOs all state that a lot of deparments don't always know how to deal with a pro-active individual (which is not the same as a hot dog/glory boy) who's every fiber to the core is devoted to crime prevention, security implementations and truely serving and protecting the community at large.

    Again thanks for the compliment, I'm far from an expert (and any good PSO, LEO or Soldier who understands what there is to understand, knows that they'll never be a master of anything, everyday you walk the thousand mile road indeed.) but I do strive for excellence.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer
    This quote deserves special comment because to me it characterizes the three traits that comprise the core difference between a professional security officer and someone who isn't - these three traits are:

    1. Mental preparedness.
    2. Mental alertness/situational awareness
    3. Mental toughness/prior resolve.

    Please note, everyone reading this, that this officer is describing the fact that he has already thought out potential situations that he might encounter...he has already thought out potential responses he might make...and he has already come to terms in his own mind with what might be required of him. Perhaps he has already "practiced" scenarios in his mind.

    When I hear officers talk about their jobs being "boring", I know I'm listening to an officer who is totally clueless about the security environment, and the very real possibility of different contingencies that can occur ANYWHERE. He thinks his written job description defines his duties, when in fact situations can easily overtake job descriptions. He has no appreciation of the value of constant preparedness, or the life-saving value of not having to hesitate about "what action is appropriate" when ACTION, not equivocation, is called for. Prior resolve is wonderful and your chances of coming home after your shift each night are enhanced by 1000% if you already know "what I'll do IF <whatever>".

    Ditto with respect to officers who talk about how wonderful it is that they get paid for "doing their homework", watching TV or otherwise goofing off on duty. That episode of CSI you're watching while on duty might be just your last episode. A security officer is always a prime target...and the bad guys don't know that you're just a do-nothing TV-watcher, do they?

    If indeed this officer does indeed conduct himself and approach his job in the serious, thoughtful manner he describes here, he is not only to be commended...he is to be emulated, and I'd take a dozen just like him.
    SecTrainer, excellent motif. I know from experience there are two types in this field and another field of your choosing, the doer and the slacker. In the security and police fields, if you are bored you are simply not doing your job, you're not looking and listening. Some folks are self starters and those who have to be pushed. Security requires people who have both an inquisitive and wary minds. Dont't wait to be told to do something, do it on your own. If your leadership doesn't like that, look for more verdant pastures.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • 3rd_shift
    replied
    I'm sure glad to see this read come back to life with some of the better posts I have read anywhere on the internet.

    Confession:
    I stopped working security 15 months ago in favor of becoming a contract driver.
    I cover nearly 600 miles a day, 5 days a week driving all over Texas delivering auto parts.

    However;
    I have my security experience to thank for it.
    I treat my Sprinter Van is my rolling guard post, and that has made a difference with these long and often, boring runs.

    I do plan on returning to working security when I get too old to drive.
    Out of over a dozen job changes I have made in my lifetime, security is still king for me overall.
    I look forward to working this line of work again when I retire.
    Until then, I have a couple million miles to cover.
    Over 150,000 were covered over the last 15 months.

    Stephen

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Qarlo X64
    I was taught to know what to look for in both Urban and Rural enviorments, to be pre-resolved of all contingencies (that anything you can think of concerning security breeches, improvised devices, booby traps, etc, is to be in mind at all times, and if you can think it ---no matter how far fetched, so will someone else eventually) and know what to do without being told what to do. Thus I'm just naturally wired to crime prevention, security implementations and how to go about engaging in combat if neccessary both armed and unarmed
    This quote deserves special comment because to me it characterizes the three traits that comprise the core difference between a professional security officer and someone who isn't - these three traits are:

    1. Mental preparedness.
    2. Mental alertness/situational awareness
    3. Mental toughness/prior resolve.

    Please note, everyone reading this, that this officer is describing the fact that he has already thought out potential situations that he might encounter...he has already thought out potential responses he might make...and he has already come to terms in his own mind with what might be required of him. Perhaps he has already "practiced" scenarios in his mind.

    When I hear officers talk about their jobs being "boring", I know I'm listening to an officer who is totally clueless about the security environment, and the very real possibility of different contingencies that can occur ANYWHERE. He thinks his written job description defines his duties, when in fact situations can easily overtake job descriptions. He has no appreciation of the value of constant preparedness, or the life-saving value of not having to hesitate about "what action is appropriate" when ACTION, not equivocation, is called for. Prior resolve is wonderful and your chances of coming home after your shift each night are enhanced by 1000% if you already know "what I'll do IF <whatever>".

    Ditto with respect to officers who talk about how wonderful it is that they get paid for "doing their homework", watching TV or otherwise goofing off on duty. That episode of CSI you're watching while on duty might be just your last episode. A security officer is always a prime target...and the bad guys don't know that you're just a do-nothing TV-watcher, do they?

    If indeed this officer does indeed conduct himself and approach his job in the serious, thoughtful manner he describes here, he is not only to be commended...he is to be emulated, and I'd take a dozen just like him.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-08-2007, 08:54 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Qarlo X64
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    I have to ask. Where did you learn the acronyms? CRE, PSC, PSO, etc. Your writing style is very unique, and I have never seen anyone write like this before.
    Well I came up "Brown Shoe" (generic slang for the old guard military, roughly the era of the 1940s - about early 1961, due to a number of things, the 1st primarily being that the Army still issued out brown service shoes and combat boots were of dark brown leather not the black or tan we see these days. The other was figurative, as that era would be considered "anachronistic and rude" and if a shoe or boot was black it get brown by applying foot to ass) with a die-hard USAF TI for a father. The man inspected my room at 0600hrs like clockwork from ages 4 to 15 respectively, put me through 60s/70s era boot camp + MCT {Military Combat Training} by a few of his brothers that served in NAM off and on from age 10 till 18, and everything was in nomenclature of some form. An example of this was that a government issued ball point pen wasn't a pen... it was "an L-2". A typewriter wasn't a typewriter... it was an MC-88, etcetera, etcetera.

    Thus in the year 2007 at age 29, my opinions and manner of looking at things is closer in age to the pious and "direct" old guard (the youngest being about 65yrs old) which is why I do believe I'm usually more on the ball in the Securities field than most of my coworkers. I was taught to know what to look for in both Urban and Rural enviorments, to be pre-resolved of all contingencies (that anything you can think of concerning security breeches, improvised devices, booby traps, etc, is to be in mind at all times, and if you can think it ---no matter how far fetched, so will someone else eventually) and know what to do without being told what to do. Thus I'm just naturally wired to crime prevention, security implementations and how to go about engaging in combat if neccessary both armed and unarmed. That said, I'm far from an expert at anything and would never claim to be, lest I would offend someone of a respective field of endeavor and/or position. I'm also a high context individual (business term here) versus a low context one, and most of America is low context... meaning explinations like this one are well elaborated on because the content is something that must be understood so that things aren't misconstrued, which can prove disasterous in our paranoid day and age.

    Thus acronymns like PSC (Private Security Contractor), PSO (Private Security Officer), CRE (Contract Regulation Enforcement) are nomenclature I came up with personally, but I feel it describes the totality of both the profession and what exactly is being conducted without having to say the whole thing. Though in this case I'm spelling it out. In time I have actually seen ppl pick up my personal nomenclature because they themsleves see why I do it. Like for example ppl use the term S/O for "Security Officer", but that doesn't say exactly of what capacity. There are S/Os within the military and other places of service in the civilian sector. When you add the "P" to S/O for PSO it states clearly that the person is in fact in the employ of a Private Security Contractor (PSC) which is what a company is for all purposes, as a "Private" Security Officer. Thus no mistake can be made for Special Police, Security of a Bouncer like capacity, Security Police, etc. much less of the civil servant capacity of Law Enforcement. It's a bit on the side of semantics, but it works for me. CRE and O&R state exactly what the capacity of deployment is for the respective officer as well. Bascially I'm professional and ramrod straight in just about everything I do. Should've been a Marine, but sadly my Diabetes II, Hyper Tension and a sleeping pill kept me out the military in spite of my decade long familiarity of MCT. I let it depress me for a spell, but took that same tenacity, professionality and pride & confidence into the private sector to make as positive a difference as I could. For me being a PSO is the spring board to being a LEO, eventually (hopefully) of a TRU (Tactical Response Unit) and/or SWAT capacity, as maybe my MCT would come full circle in life saving in high risk situations.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    I have to ask. Where did you learn the acronyms? CRE, PSC, PSO, etc. Your writing style is very unique, and I have never seen anyone write like this before.

    Leave a comment:


  • Qarlo X64
    replied
    After doing a wide variety of jobs prior to my 22nd birthday, which included: Movie Theatre Usher, Lawn Care Worker, Martial Arts Studio Caretaker, Courier, Exotic Club Bouncer (2 different clubs on that note) and a few other **** details I'd rather forget... I went to work for Burns/Pinkerton in 2001 [now Securitas] and didn't do much really except for work in a high rise office building on Dog Watch/3rd Shift. I was non commissioned at that time and really didn't think much of it to be honest, but I had pride in the fact I've always been a super observant person, I wanted to do more but there was a lot of family issues that superceeded it.

    Finally around 2005 I went to work for a small local PSC (Private Security Contractor) and found my niche. Taking that same super observant gift I've always had, I was thrown out to the dogs so to speak. I honestly thought the company was going to field me out to a business centre or more high rise offices... instead, they gave me a radio, and umm... A RADIO and out I went still non commissioned to conduct CRE (Contract Regulation Enforcement) in some truly rowdy/violent section 8 government housing complexes. Now I grew up in a pretty crappy enviorment and could walk the walk as well as talk the talk, but I didn't know "Security" of that kind existed, figured it was all O&R (Observe & Report). Over the course of 2 months I held down some seriously messed up posts that even the local police avoided if they didn't need to roll out on, and got my commission. It was then I realized I wanted to look into Law Enforcement work since I more or less was doing everything shy of actual arrests. But as fate would have it, my grandmother fell ill at age 90, and I left the work force for a year to take care of her with my parents until she passed on.

    NOW I'm doing Mall Security while I go to school for my Peace Officer's certification, still commissioned but not allowed to carry, after working for (2) other PSCs of which did not have many CRE posts, I left them for the one I work for now. Sadly I can never work any post where you basically get paid to be a hot body and can read books or watch DVDs all night as long as an hourly patrol is done... Naaah, something in me changed while I was on those HUD complexes and later guarding a bank. I realized I have to be where I can not only FEEL but KNOW that I'm making a difference. Detering would be crime, and regulating on the stuff as it happens, then handing over the DBs (Dirtbags) to the responding LEOs. So I'm still in the "security" business because I believe in what the mission of *Security* ultimately is. It's just difficult having to work with other PSOs who don't give a damn about anything, and run the seriousness of the profession into the ground. Since transferring over from CRE construction sites [commissioned], the mall gig is a nice change, but only because the security unit I'm apart of are all top notch guys, mostly ex military and ex LEOs who also want to get the job done right. Sadly though, citizens still look down their noses at us, but they never hesistate to yell for us Rent-A-Cops when the chips are down either. It's a great profession for those who "love" what they do despite the lackluster $Money situation.

    Leave a comment:


  • BoyInBlue
    replied
    My Kung Fu teacher used to be a bouncer and hooked me up with a job. I did that on the weekends and soon after quite my day job as a cook. Now I do security for the place I used to cook at, and bounce on the weekends.

    Leave a comment:


  • Here4th$
    replied
    Why I'm here

    My name pretty much says it all....

    As a Security Officer, I make nearly three times what I made as a Police Officer and no one’s pointed a gun at me since I started here.

    Leave a comment:


  • alamedaad
    replied
    I started at 19 years old. I had wanted to be a cop and I figured that it would be at least something related to the career field.

    I got into security while going to school for Admin. of Justice and then realized how much goes on in the mall. I decided to cool my heels where I am because if this much s**t happens in the mall, I really don't want to deal with the rest of the city. That theory may change at some point, but I figure don't fix it if it ain't broken . . .

    Leave a comment:


  • jeff194307
    replied
    For me,it was another uniform after retiring from the USAF. My first security job was with a Sacramento Company named Vanguard Security. First assignment was at Sacramento Utility District Headquarters, then at Birdcage Walk Shopping Center. After 6+ years, I went to work as an Officer at Pelican Bay State Prison (a different uniform) Today, I work at the college in my home town in Illinois. been ther for one year and look forward to next fall. Great job!!

    Leave a comment:


  • wjohnc
    replied
    Even as a kid I knew justice services of some type was my fate. In 1992 I began looking around. The Canadian Security Intelligence Service (Canada's FBI / CIA / whatever) was considered useless by some (until 9/11, that is) and was not hiring, the Army - is there any other branch? - was in the midst of a big, big mess involving prisoner torture and they were'nt hiring. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police I wasn't interested in, and our provincial police the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary was in the middle of a decade long hiring freeze.

    What was left? Security, of course.
    People now tell me I do the same work as the police, why don't I join. I tell them the money would be much better, but there's a reason for that: media on one shoulder, whore lawyers on another, the un/misinformed public on your head, all conspiring to push you down into the crap.
    I don't have to deal with that. I just do my job really damn well, get recognized for it, and nobody important is looking to get me.


    I love security. I am a security guard.

    JohnC

    Leave a comment:


  • CorpSec
    replied
    I started at 19 years old. I had wanted to be a cop and I figured that it would be at least something related to the career field.

    I was working a very physical job at the time with 10 hour shifts. I would come home sore and dirty. After my first few days working security I literally could not believe what they were paying me to do. They had no problem with me doing homework or reading magazines or listening to the radio as long as 3 rounds were done a shift. I would sit in a nice air conditioned office and shoot the breeze with the factory workers that went out to smoke.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Chimpie
    I'm so completely by what I'm reading.

    Summarizing: "I work in security because there is no boss watching over my shoulder, able to read the newspaper/magazine, like telling people what to do..."

    I... I ... I just don't know what to say. All I want to do is rant and rave right now.

    :throws up hands and walks out of the room:
    I think a couple of the responses, at least, were bogus.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chimpie
    replied
    I'm so completely by what I'm reading.

    Summarizing: "I work in security because there is no boss watching over my shoulder, able to read the newspaper/magazine, like telling people what to do..."

    I... I ... I just don't know what to say. All I want to do is rant and rave right now.

    :throws up hands and walks out of the room:

    Leave a comment:

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