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  • #16
    I wasn't really planning on going into security full time but I was looking to leave the Fire Department and was going to submit applications to a couple of EMS agencies. When I contacted a supervisor who I had worked Security with a couple of years back he said that one of the EMTs working nights had fallen asleep on duty needed to be replaced. I only need a job reference but he convinced me to come to work for him for more money than I'd make riding an ambulance.
    Now I sit in the guard shack with the security officer and work security until someone gets hurt then I switch into EMT mode. What's hard to understand is that the security company we work for doesn't really have ranks. It uses job titles based on pay. So unarmed SOs are usually out ranked by armed SOs. EMTs out rank unarmed or unarmed SOs. The senior EMT at the jobsite is the supervisor of all the security company employees. He's the one who does our time sheets and adjusts the schedules so the client always has one SO and one EMT/SO on duty. When I work my shift with my SO partner I'm technically in charge even though the SO may have worked there much longer than me.
    Last edited by EMTGuard; 12-02-2005, 11:11 PM.
    Hospital Security Officer

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    • #17
      It's what I did in the military and it seemed a natural progression to go from one uniform to another.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by EMTGuard
        I wasn't really planning on going into security full time but I was looking to leave the Fire Department and was going to submit applications to a couple of EMS agencies. When I contacted a supervisor who I had worked Security with a couple of years back he said that one of the EMTs working nights had fallen asleep on duty needed to be replaced. I only need a job reference but he convinced me to come to work for him for more money than I'd make riding an ambulance.
        Now I sit in the guard shack with the security officer and work security until someone gets hurt then I switch into EMT mode. What's hard to understand is that the security company we work for doesn't really have ranks. It uses job titles based on pay. So unarmed SOs are usually out ranked by armed SOs. EMTs out rank unarmed or unarmed SOs. The senior EMT at the jobsite is the supervisor of all the security company employees. He's the one who does our time sheets and adjusts the schedules so the client always has one SO and one EMT/SO on duty. When I work my shift with my SO partner I'm technically in charge even though the SO may have worked there much longer than me.
        I worked for a company, long ago, that gave every armed officer the rank of Private First Class, right off the bat. Corporals were required to be armed. This meant that an armed PFC had rank authority over an unarmed post supervisor. Since I was an unarmed post supervisor, I would constantly have to call a corporal to have the PFC who didn't want to do things according to company rules (BlameTheGuard knows what I'm talking about, they were from South St. Pete, I was a North St. Pete FTO and Site Super), and remind them that they're not on an armed post.

        I somewhat like the concept of that, but I believe in a more sane chain of command. Every employee should be able to instantly identify any other employee on the chain of command, up to the owner of the company.

        But, then again, I believe in using MPO/PFCs as "corporal helpers," with the corporals being assigned the beginning of NCO/Super duties. MPO/PFC would show that your exceptional at what your doing. Corporal would show that your a supervisor of men, and Sergeant would show that your a supervisor of men and an extension of company management.
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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        • #19
          Why?

          I love standing around in all sorts of weather making sure doors are locked. It's a rush and I can't believe I get paid to do this. High speed, low drag!
          ‎"If you can't tolerate humor directed at you, you do not deserve to be taken seriously"

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          • #20
            I'm another one who did not switch. I've been doing it since the 70's.

            I was in the Boy Scouts. I liked the emergency services types of things we did, the junior firefighter, forst aid etc. This got me involved in the local Civil Defense group where I became a auxilary frefighter & started taken EMT courses. As a Scout I had also worked at the Man & His World site in 1968 (the fair that continued on the site of Expo 67). Part of our dutes there were security related, keeping people from going to areas they were not supposed to go to.

            I took a 3 year college course in Police Technology. Around that time Quebec's language law changed. To be a Police Officer you had to be fluent in French. I wasn't & unlike a lot of my Anglophone friends I did not want to move from Montreal to an "English" part of Canada. I also was just a little short for the height standards that existed in those days & wore glasses.

            I looked around for some tyoe of work that was "similar" to police work & where I could also use my firefighting & EMT skills. Hotels were described as being cities within a city. They did not have height & glasses restrictions & most tourists were from outside of Quebec, mostly English speaking. So I started in hotel security in 1977 & have been doing it ever since!!
            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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            • #21
              Why I made the jump...

              For me, it was because of traditional customer service positions. I was

              no longer able to tolerate customers' constant browbeating and attempted

              intimidation tactics. After a couple of incidents that involved me losing my

              temper at irate customers, I realized that the time had come for me to make

              a change.
              "The price of freedom is eternal vigilance."
              - Thomas Jefferson

              “Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence.”
              — Vince Lombardi

              "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

              IX. Strive to attain professional competence.

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              • #22
                I'm so completely by what I'm reading.

                Summarizing: "I work in security because there is no boss watching over my shoulder, able to read the newspaper/magazine, like telling people what to do..."

                I... I ... I just don't know what to say. All I want to do is rant and rave right now.

                :throws up hands and walks out of the room:

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Chimpie
                  I'm so completely by what I'm reading.

                  Summarizing: "I work in security because there is no boss watching over my shoulder, able to read the newspaper/magazine, like telling people what to do..."

                  I... I ... I just don't know what to say. All I want to do is rant and rave right now.

                  :throws up hands and walks out of the room:
                  I think a couple of the responses, at least, were bogus.
                  "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                  "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                  "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                  "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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                  • #24
                    I started at 19 years old. I had wanted to be a cop and I figured that it would be at least something related to the career field.

                    I was working a very physical job at the time with 10 hour shifts. I would come home sore and dirty. After my first few days working security I literally could not believe what they were paying me to do. They had no problem with me doing homework or reading magazines or listening to the radio as long as 3 rounds were done a shift. I would sit in a nice air conditioned office and shoot the breeze with the factory workers that went out to smoke.

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                    • #25
                      Even as a kid I knew justice services of some type was my fate. In 1992 I began looking around. The Canadian Security Intelligence Service (Canada's FBI / CIA / whatever) was considered useless by some (until 9/11, that is) and was not hiring, the Army - is there any other branch? - was in the midst of a big, big mess involving prisoner torture and they were'nt hiring. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police I wasn't interested in, and our provincial police the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary was in the middle of a decade long hiring freeze.

                      What was left? Security, of course.
                      People now tell me I do the same work as the police, why don't I join. I tell them the money would be much better, but there's a reason for that: media on one shoulder, whore lawyers on another, the un/misinformed public on your head, all conspiring to push you down into the crap.
                      I don't have to deal with that. I just do my job really damn well, get recognized for it, and nobody important is looking to get me.


                      I love security. I am a security guard.

                      JohnC
                      Rule #1: Go home at the end of the day in an upright position, with everything attached, and with peace of mind for having done the job well.
                      "I won't be wronged. I won't be insulted. I won't be laid a-hand on. I don't do these things to other people, and I require the same from them." - John Wayne (in his last movie 'The Shootist')

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                      • #26
                        For me,it was another uniform after retiring from the USAF. My first security job was with a Sacramento Company named Vanguard Security. First assignment was at Sacramento Utility District Headquarters, then at Birdcage Walk Shopping Center. After 6+ years, I went to work as an Officer at Pelican Bay State Prison (a different uniform) Today, I work at the college in my home town in Illinois. been ther for one year and look forward to next fall. Great job!!
                        Murphy was an optomist.

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                        • #27
                          I started at 19 years old. I had wanted to be a cop and I figured that it would be at least something related to the career field.

                          I got into security while going to school for Admin. of Justice and then realized how much goes on in the mall. I decided to cool my heels where I am because if this much s**t happens in the mall, I really don't want to deal with the rest of the city. That theory may change at some point, but I figure don't fix it if it ain't broken . . .
                          The law is reason free from passion." -- Aristotle

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                          • #28
                            Why I'm here

                            My name pretty much says it all....

                            As a Security Officer, I make nearly three times what I made as a Police Officer and no one’s pointed a gun at me since I started here.

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                            • #29
                              My Kung Fu teacher used to be a bouncer and hooked me up with a job. I did that on the weekends and soon after quite my day job as a cook. Now I do security for the place I used to cook at, and bounce on the weekends.
                              Police Officer

                              Experience: Bouncer, EMT, Theme Park Security, Money Transport, Armed Guard

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                              • #30
                                After doing a wide variety of jobs prior to my 22nd birthday, which included: Movie Theatre Usher, Lawn Care Worker, Martial Arts Studio Caretaker, Courier, Exotic Club Bouncer (2 different clubs on that note) and a few other **** details I'd rather forget... I went to work for Burns/Pinkerton in 2001 [now Securitas] and didn't do much really except for work in a high rise office building on Dog Watch/3rd Shift. I was non commissioned at that time and really didn't think much of it to be honest, but I had pride in the fact I've always been a super observant person, I wanted to do more but there was a lot of family issues that superceeded it.

                                Finally around 2005 I went to work for a small local PSC (Private Security Contractor) and found my niche. Taking that same super observant gift I've always had, I was thrown out to the dogs so to speak. I honestly thought the company was going to field me out to a business centre or more high rise offices... instead, they gave me a radio, and umm... A RADIO and out I went still non commissioned to conduct CRE (Contract Regulation Enforcement) in some truly rowdy/violent section 8 government housing complexes. Now I grew up in a pretty crappy enviorment and could walk the walk as well as talk the talk, but I didn't know "Security" of that kind existed, figured it was all O&R (Observe & Report). Over the course of 2 months I held down some seriously messed up posts that even the local police avoided if they didn't need to roll out on, and got my commission. It was then I realized I wanted to look into Law Enforcement work since I more or less was doing everything shy of actual arrests. But as fate would have it, my grandmother fell ill at age 90, and I left the work force for a year to take care of her with my parents until she passed on.

                                NOW I'm doing Mall Security while I go to school for my Peace Officer's certification, still commissioned but not allowed to carry, after working for (2) other PSCs of which did not have many CRE posts, I left them for the one I work for now. Sadly I can never work any post where you basically get paid to be a hot body and can read books or watch DVDs all night as long as an hourly patrol is done... Naaah, something in me changed while I was on those HUD complexes and later guarding a bank. I realized I have to be where I can not only FEEL but KNOW that I'm making a difference. Detering would be crime, and regulating on the stuff as it happens, then handing over the DBs (Dirtbags) to the responding LEOs. So I'm still in the "security" business because I believe in what the mission of *Security* ultimately is. It's just difficult having to work with other PSOs who don't give a damn about anything, and run the seriousness of the profession into the ground. Since transferring over from CRE construction sites [commissioned], the mall gig is a nice change, but only because the security unit I'm apart of are all top notch guys, mostly ex military and ex LEOs who also want to get the job done right. Sadly though, citizens still look down their noses at us, but they never hesistate to yell for us Rent-A-Cops when the chips are down either. It's a great profession for those who "love" what they do despite the lackluster $Money situation.

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