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  • #61
    I simply think that if police officers have problems with security in their area then they should sit down with them and have a discussion. I am not saying we need a bunch of private police running around, but in this post 9/11 era we will be much better off if we communicate and work as a team than a "every man for himself" mentality. Cooperation and teamwork goes a long way in accomplishing our goals.

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    • #62
      I've asked cops about this, both in real life and on officer.com.

      Universally, the answer was:

      It isn't my f-ing job to babysit your pathetic guards.

      Add, "We should be there," or "They shouldn't allow uniformed guards," or all sorts of other things to that conversation, as well.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #63
        It doesn't seem to be that way in my area. I think most police officers (all area PD's) respect security officers. We seem to have a good working relationship with most security companies. My PD has a security divison and we all work together very well. We have roll call together, got to meal break, etc.
        I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
        -Lieutenant Commander Data
        sigpic

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        • #64
          Rant...

          What alot of Police Officers seem to be unable to understand is that there are different levels of Security, in other words the Security Guard in the shack at the local mill is not the same Security Professional doing convoy work in Iraq.

          I think alot of the problem comes from 1) the media...they always show Cops in shootouts and flipping cars and doing jui jitsu when the reality for most Police Officers is quit the opposite, and 2) the Police Academy's because they drill into the heads of all young recruits that their lives are on the line every second of every day...and don't get me wrong this is a good thing to teach but alot of these guys and girls really believe it, again because of media.

          And think about this...do you know of any other profession that tells people how dangerous their job is more than the Police? It seems every other word out of their mouth is danger...when you are out to lunch and the local construction workers come in to eat do they constantly talk about how much danger they are in? No! But the local yokal Police Officers can't seem to tell you enough.

          I know that alot of this is bravado but come on enough is enough already, I like to impress girls as much as anyone but you know I don't tell war stories to just anyone I only tell them when I'm with a group of guys that know where I'm coming from and not the local frycook.

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          • #65
            I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
            -Lieutenant Commander Data
            sigpic

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            • #66
              I always found it strange that BLS and OSHA noted that "security guards and survelience operators" have the highest rate of job-related homicide, yet the industry refuses to address it.

              Yet, OSHA and BLS require police departments to address it.
              Some Kind of Commando Leader

              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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              • #67
                What really kills me is when the locals complain about responding to your location, they forget that even though the business hired extra eyes and ears that they are still paid by that same property owner through taxes, and it's their "JOB". If you don't like it... quit!!! But don't whine about it.

                Don't get me wrong, the Security industry holds alot of responsability for the problems...but we are not responsable for "everything". The industry as a whole needs to step up to the plate but if the Locals won't play ball whats the point.

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                • #68
                  Someday, maybe we will all be treated with mutual respect. I for one cannot understand that police officers have against security. There is no harm in the police who complain about doing stupid calls that waste their time training security to handle those calls. People need to get it through their heads, we need to communicate and cooperate in this day and age. A few suggestions; assist your local security company, if they don't want it well at least the offer was made. When a threat is recieved or a suspect on the loose, share the info with security in your area. At the very least this info might prevent a security officer inadvertantly contacting a bad guy and getting killed. Offer to screen recruits. Police depts. can search any criminal database for free yet it costs private citizens money. People complain becuase of felons working security, but often times the databases companies go through don't show the information.
                  In most cases the city cop doesn't do anything for anti-terrorism. I don't see too many cops working airports or marinas or inspecting cargo (yes I know there are some who do it). The vast majority though is a private security officer that is often undertrained and underpaid. Mr. Chertoff (I think is his name) director of Homeland Security says agencies need to communicate better, yet the largest and most populated entity, security, is ignored. I know there are a lot of bad apples in our field and we need to weed them out. Hopefully our industry will change for the better and not the worse.

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Tennsix
                    While most police casualties are caused by accidental assaults, law enforcement is one of the few professions where people are purposely targeted for felonious assault. That is why we academy instructors emphasize the dangerous element of the profession....
                    There is NO WAY I would want to take on the risks that police officers do, especially when it comes to traffic stops. Not only do you have to worry about getting shot by the occupants in the vehicle, but you also have a good chance of some idiot plowing into you while you talk to the driver. Why LEO agencies continue to use red and/or blue lights to the rear instead of white and yellow to minimize this risk, I don't know.

                    Then there's the paperwork. Unbelievable. Not to mention that it's dangerous to do paperwork while you are in your cruiser. Some gang-banger or other wacko that has a grudge against the police can walk up on you at night and assassinate you.

                    I worry that the police officers in my area are too quick to cancel the second b/u unit because they don't want to make the other officer leave his sector. If you are a police officer, DON'T let your guard down. You should handle yourself like someone is trying to kill you because, sadly, they just might. You have my respect.
                    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by talon
                      What really kills me is when the locals complain about responding to your location, they forget that even though the business hired extra eyes and ears that they are still paid by that same property owner through taxes, and it's their "JOB". If you don't like it... quit!!! But don't whine about it.
                      I had no problem whatsoever when I was a cop helping a security guard when the guard really needed my help. But I'd get really annoyed if a security guard called me for some crap that he could either have handled himself or the guard caused the problem in the first place.

                      An example is when a security guard at an office building called the police to have a car towed out of the office building's parking lot. I was the lucky guy working a report car that day so I got the handle. A visitor parked in some executive's reserved parking space and the executive told the guard to have the visitor's car towed. Without making any effort to find the visitor, which wasn't difficult since the visitor signed in the visitor log with his name and the person he was there to see, and ask the visitor to move his car the guard just called the cops. The visitor's car was parked in a private parking lot, not a public roadway, so I could not have towed the car even if I wanted to. However; the security guard, acting as an agent of the property owner, could have had the car towed away. The security guard did not know he could have the car towed, he thought the cops had to do it. Not only that, it probably would not have been necessary to tow the car if the guard had sought out the visitor and told him to move his car. The thought of finding the visitor never crossed this guard's mind. I went and found the visitor (like I said it was not difficult) and told him to move his car to another space not marked "Reserved" or it would be towed. The visitor couldn't move fast enough. Problem solved, but it didn't need to be solved by me.

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by histfan71
                        I had no problem whatsoever when I was a cop helping a security guard when the guard really needed my help. But I'd get really annoyed if a security guard called me for some crap that he could either have handled himself or the guard caused the problem in the first place.

                        An example is when a security guard at an office building called the police to have a car towed out of the office building's parking lot. I was the lucky guy working a report car that day so I got the handle. A visitor parked in some executive's reserved parking space and the executive told the guard to have the visitor's car towed. Without making any effort to find the visitor, which wasn't difficult since the visitor signed in the visitor log with his name and the person he was there to see, and ask the visitor to move his car the guard just called the cops. The visitor's car was parked in a private parking lot, not a public roadway, so I could not have towed the car even if I wanted to. However; the security guard, acting as an agent of the property owner, could have had the car towed away. The security guard did not know he could have the car towed, he thought the cops had to do it. Not only that, it probably would not have been necessary to tow the car if the guard had sought out the visitor and told him to move his car. The thought of finding the visitor never crossed this guard's mind. I went and found the visitor (like I said it was not difficult) and told him to move his car to another space not marked "Reserved" or it would be towed. The visitor couldn't move fast enough. Problem solved, but it didn't need to be solved by me.
                        Of course not. Consequently, many folks simply aren't trained in that. Especially clients. I was assigned to a property for a night, and was handed the post orders. It was unarmed, and I was ordered to work it armed and "put the fear of God into them."

                        This generally means that the guys they have out there aren't working, and it needed some proactive enforcement and prevention.

                        There was nothing to indicate that there was a towing procedure. So, I contacted the resident manager and asked. He advised me that they don't tow, because the Sheriff's Office dosen't tow on private property.

                        I stayed after for an hour with the management, after putting those evil evil tickets on everything that needed to be towed out, finding a towing company that would do FSS 715 (Private Impound) tows. When I returned that night for another 12, the signs were up and I was ready to tow.

                        We towed BOATS. We towed cars, trucks, vans, motorcycles, we towed everything. After that, people started registering their cars, and the "homeowner's assocation" hated me because they were telling the members that you don't have to pay for parking permits - security never tows.

                        On the inverse, I rather dislike a police officer publically telling my trespass suspect that I don't have any authority to remove that person, and "only the police can tell you to leave." Her Corporal rewired her head to be in conformity with Florida Statute after the Corporal found out. If I call you out to my site to witness a trespass warning, its because your agency won't permit us to use our own forms and photographic evidence of the warning, not because "only the police can trespass people."
                        Some Kind of Commando Leader

                        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                        • #72
                          Wonderful. Wrote a long post, and the website gave a timeout error when I submitted it. I lost 2 pages of text.
                          Some Kind of Commando Leader

                          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Yeah, I heard stories about Dallas trying to arrest security guards for that kind of crap. Fortunately, the state police has spoken up about the issue and clarified that since the uniform is registered with the state bureau, it is an official uniform and there is not a thing they can do about it, as long as the state seal, state flag, or the word "police" or the name of any law enforcement agency is not displayed on it. Still, the pissing match continues.
                            "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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                            • #74
                              Social prejudice is very prolific isn't it?
                              "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Tennsix
                                It doesn't seem to be that way in my area. I think most police officers (all area PD's) respect security officers. We seem to have a good working relationship with most security companies. My PD has a security divison and we all work together very well. We have roll call together, got to meal break, etc.
                                My goodness, that's how it should be. That sounds wonderful.
                                "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                                Comment

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