Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Blackhawk Gladius

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Blackhawk Gladius

    I received the Blackhawk Gadius flashlight for Christmas. One of it's advertised uses is it's strobe function which apparently is designed to be used as a defensive weapon. As most know, being Canadian I am VERY limited in what kind of weapon I am allowed. (No sprays, Tasers etc). Does anyone have experience with using a high intensity flashlight as a weapon?
    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

  • #2
    That is a great light, I love the strobe function. As far as using it for a weapon, try this, fresh batteries in the light, start the strobe and point it in your eyes. should give you a good idea of what it does as a weapon. the light is great to distract your advisary. especially in close quarters. if you are hands on, up close and personal and you can blast the bad guy in the eye from a few inches away, wether strobing or not you have taken away someting very important - vision - be it niight or day, inside or out if you can't see you cannot fight as effectively.

    you could always roll it up in your hand and pop em' in a soft spot to, but that is anoter story
    Wisdom - Having a lot to say, but knowing when to keep it to yourself.

    Comment


    • #3
      There is or was a light called "the Dazzler" that was supposed to use a strobing function to cause disorientation. Don't know exactly what's happening with that. I know this has been an area of research for the military.
      "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

      "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

      "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

      "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by LiveNlearn View Post
        That is a great light, I love the strobe function. As far as using it for a weapon, try this, fresh batteries in the light, start the strobe and point it in your eyes. should give you a good idea of what it does as a weapon. the light is great to distract your advisary. especially in close quarters. if you are hands on, up close and personal and you can blast the bad guy in the eye from a few inches away, wether strobing or not you have taken away someting very important - vision - be it niight or day, inside or out if you can't see you cannot fight as effectively.

        you could always roll it up in your hand and pop em' in a soft spot to, but that is anoter story
        Hotel hallways are close quarters! New Years Eve & the night before & after are always wild in my downtown hotel. (To give an example we usually have 1 Officer on the overnight shift - this Sunday & Monday I have 2 or 3 of my staff & 15 from an outside Agency). Will probably be able to let you know how it worked on Tuesday
        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm sorry but.....

          A bright light is a great tool, for lighting things up that is, but when you have to consider that as a weapon, your government is basically showing its' distrust of the average citizen, and leaving the criminal element the definate advantage.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by bpdblue View Post
            A bright light is a great tool, for lighting things up that is, but when you have to consider that as a weapon, your government is basically showing its' distrust of the average citizen, and leaving the criminal element the definate advantage.
            Agreed my country is too strict on allowing ordinary citizens to have weapons but some of your ststes (I believe unlioke Canada where the Federal Government regulates it in the US it is the State), there is not enough control.
            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

            Comment


            • #7
              Actually the federal government has regulations regarding weapons. States can institute further things if they so desire, but they take on the costs and problem associated with it.

              Considering where I live, my state's regulations are just fine by me and I find it suprising that people can stand regulations like in california or other severely restricted states... doesn't seem to lower crime stats any.

              Pulling a gun on someone in Alaska is foolhardy Statewide, no licence required, concealed carry. You can get a license if you want reciprocity with other states, but for carry in-state it is not required... and lots of people carry

              Allowing citizens to carry the means to defend themselves is something that should never go away, considering law enforcement is always going to be reactive in 99% of cases... You don't often see a cop walking into a bank just as it's getting held up... or strolling up to a mugging.

              Committing a crime in a state with "lax" gun control is basically creating a russian roulette situation for a criminal... are the cylinders actually loaded, or are they empty? Most probably won't want to find out...

              Oh, and if they come to my house or my family.. it's like playing russian roulette with a 1911 NOT a good idea.
              Overmotivated and Underpaid... I'm a Security supervisors wet dream...

              Comment


              • #8
                In the U.S. it is a combination of federal and state laws that cover weapon possession and usage.

                Some states do allow a lot more weaponry than others, regulating their possession and usage.

                But it seems that it is often areas that have the most severe gun control laws that have the most crime, including our Capital, Washington D.C.

                The opposite of that, meaning the lower usage of weapons in criminal use, often occurs in areas where concealed carry laws are in place.

                So, it is hard to state that the laws forbidding weapons are keeping people more secure, than laws stating GOOD persons can have weapons to protect themselves. I tend to believe that weapons in the hands of good people, who know how to use the weapon, more often than not, put the fear of harm into the mind of the bad guys, and possibly, make the bad guys move on to more peaceful areas.

                But, at least in the U.S., one does have the ability (in most places) to have a weapon to defend themself from the uglyness out in the world, of which there is plenty in this country to contend with.

                Comment


                • #9
                  In researching this I read about this place: Pennsylvania State University's Institute for Non-lethal Defense Technologies. Apparently they are in the process of developing an LED light that can be used as a defense weapon. (Shhh.. keep this to ourselves, if the politicians in Canada hear about it they will probably ban them too )
                  I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                  Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yep, its called a 4 D cell Maglite LED model.

                    *THWACK*
                    Overmotivated and Underpaid... I'm a Security supervisors wet dream...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Alaska Security View Post
                      Yep, its called a 4 D cell Maglite LED model.

                      *THWACK*
                      It's not a baton, but it is effective! Unless Canada bans them too! LOL!

                      Be Safe,

                      Hank
                      " We are determined that before the sun sets on this terrible struggle, our flag will be recognized throughout the world as a symbol of freedom on one hand and of overwhelming force on the other" - General George C. Marshall

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you have one of the bright lights, it is a useful technique while you are field interviewing at night to occasionally "sweep" your light across the subject's eyes, perhaps every 20-30 seconds. This doesn't harm them in any way, and they only notice occasional "glares" from your light, but it reduces their night vision briefly, and provides you with one more slight advantage.
                        "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                        "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                        "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                        "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Alaska Security View Post
                          Yep, its called a 4 D cell Maglite LED model.

                          *THWACK*
                          Ah! that torch/flashlight became an impact weapon the moment you intended to strike with it... to be honest I wasn't all to impressed with the magLED technology in terms of output versus the Terralux TLE-6EX-B

                          Strobe function a weapon? more like a safety feature I'd proclaim! and yes I've used a high output LED torch to disorient an individual before... totally destroyed their night vision! highly recommended


                          BTW excellent gift HotelSecurity!
                          "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give" - Winston Churchill

                          Comment

                          Leaderboard

                          Collapse
                          Working...
                          X