Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I should know this, but...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I think the burning the tin thing is to remove the wax, leaving you with a paste. Alternately, some just buy the paste.

    As far as the candle warmer, this is better than how it was explained to me. In "my" method, you put it on with your hands, and your body heat melted the polish into the boot's leather.

    I would prefer having something else melt it, obviously.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

    Comment


    • #17
      I should know this, but...

      I hear wax, ways heat wax up and what way to put on. But i don't hear any thing about cleaning it first. I use saddle soap get my boots clean first then i wax and polish them.
      CAPTAIN KOOLAID 9594


      oh ya

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
        I think the burning the tin thing is to remove the wax, leaving you with a paste. Alternately, some just buy the paste.

        As far as the candle warmer, this is better than how it was explained to me. In "my" method, you put it on with your hands, and your body heat melted the polish into the boot's leather.

        I would prefer having something else melt it, obviously.
        My method is simple, but certianly not the only way to do it.

        Materials:
        KIWI shoe polish
        Candle warmer
        Saddle Soap
        Foam Paint brushes (gazillion of em for a buck at most craft stores)
        old t-shirts to ruin (or go to the local auto parts store and get a pack of diaper cloths)
        Glass of water
        Horsehair shoe polishing brush

        1. Get the polish on the candle warmer and get that going.

        2. Take the laces out of the boots and spend some time with an old toothbrush and the saddle soap and a little bit of water to make the saddle soap suds, going through the tread of the boots, toe and heels getting all the loose dirt etc off the boots. Saddle soap also takes off any old polish/foriegn substance on the boot. Make sure you dry the boots after cleaning them.

        3. By now the polish should be well melted, so take your foam brush and lightly dip the brush into the polish and start brushing it on lightly over the toe until it is all coated nicely. You will notice that the polish runs a bit and makes lines of polish on the toe. This is where your water comes in.

        4. Take the tshirt or diaper cloth and dip it into the polish (just a touch, maybe the size of a dime), then dip it into the water. Then start going in a circular motion over the streaks of polish. The water will make the polish more shiny and the cloth will act as an abrasive to smooth out where the polish ran.

        5. Once everything is smoothed out, if it's not shiny enough for ya or a spot got rubbed free of polish, apply another coat and repeat the process as nessassary.

        Remember, the polish is shiny, but the water is what really brings out the shine. Some guys use spit or beer in place of water, but that sounds like a perfectly good waste of both if you ask me.

        It is time consuming, but your boots are where the rubber meets the road, take care of them.
        Last edited by Contact; 11-06-2007, 02:37 PM.
        Anything that hits the fan,
        Will not be evenly distributed.

        Comment


        • #19
          Well...

          Here is what I have learned to do:

          Pants: When you first get them, go to a dry-cleaner and get the pressed w/ extra-havy starch. Costs a little bit, but they will usually hold the creases better for you down the road. Also, having the creases sewn in is worth the money.

          Boots: Strip the boots w/ alcohol. Leather condition with a low-pH saddle soap/conditioner. The lower pH is closer to that of the leather, so it doesn't stain it or eat the stitching up like Kiwi products will. I am trying to find my bottle to get you the brand name, but it is from a chemist out of Louisiana. Then, buff in a decent black polish. I usually cheat and slick on the liquid polish with the built-in spnge from Kiwi. Use Armor All wipes for a quick touch-up when needed. It helps keep the shine up for a while.

          Comment


          • #20
            WOW! No wonder I don't know the "right" way to polish my shoes - my rough count from the posts so far is that there are about 13 gazillion ways! Thanks for the many suggestions. I will try them and see what works best.
            That's a direct quote. Not word for word, but the gist of it.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by officerchick View Post
              WOW! No wonder I don't know the "right" way to polish my shoes - my rough count from the posts so far is that there are about 13 gazillion ways! Thanks for the many suggestions. I will try them and see what works best.
              Exactly, more important than that, none is better than the others. Some work best for some people, some work best for others. As long as you and your supervisors are happy with them, you're golden.
              Anything that hits the fan,
              Will not be evenly distributed.

              Comment


              • #22
                Thanks Contact - next time I need to re-do my boots I will use your method.

                OC - yes some of us do it one way and some of us do it another way. It depends on WHERE you work, the requirements and if you have on BDU's or dress uniforms. As I stated, I have worn my boots with my suits for about 10 years now and keep them shiney so they do not advertise what I am wearing to everyone. I have worked on crappy building or refurb sites where the concrete dust settles into everything and a quick wipe over will clean them up nicely. Best tip ? Buy 2 pairs of boots if you can and keep one as your clean pair and the old ones as a dirty pair for those jobs that are not so clean (ie. mud and slush).

                Oh and if you really want to be a boot-aholic, strip off the polish with rubbing alcohol or methylated spirits back to the leather again - works to take out cracks, etc.
                "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

                Comment


                • #23
                  I'm surprised no one has "advocated" "spiritedly" keeping the old polish, which is British military tradition. Our military tradition, of course, is to strip the polish off between shining.

                  I remember reading somewhere that with some career enlisted, the boots would actually be thicker from every layer that was kept on.

                  I, personally, would think this would eventually crack like magic shell, but who knows?
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Oc

                    The leather treatment I was talking about is called Kali Leather Life. It works great for cleaning/conditioning. I work a few construction sites and this stuff keeps my boots looking good for when I have my meetings and such...

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Contact View Post
                      For those of you who use the heating method, I found a cool way to do it that I think works really well. It is also good because Danner reccomends you not use direct heat on their boots to protect the gore tex liner

                      I bought one of those candle warmers that instead of lighting the candle, you turn it on and set the candle on it and it melts the candle. You can get em for less than 10 bucks.

                      Throw the shoe polish tin on it, and 10 minutes later you have a full tin of liquid shoe polish ready to use! Brush the polish on with a foam paint brush, let it harden and polish like normal. When you're finished, just leave the tin on the candle warmer and turn the warmer off, and 10 minutes later your shoe polish will be hard and level again.




                      Incidentally, the hot-plate of a coffee maker works too.
                      That's a direct quote. Not word for word, but the gist of it.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Wow, never thought about using the armor all, i'll have to try that. Yeah, i have 2 pairs also. I have magnum's for my primary shiny pair, and my old Origional SWAT's for my crap job pair. Ironically, the SWAT's are holding up better than the magnums!
                        If you fail to plan, plan to fail.

                        "People look to you to dig them out of life threatening dung - that is an awesome responsibility and should be honoured with your blood and sweat in preparation for the day when you may have to work very hard to save someone you might not even know or like. If you are terrible at your job, somebody gets blinded/maimed/disfigured or killed."-Slack

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I found the Magnums soles wear out faster in foot patrols ........ but did not like the feel of the Swats. At $150.00 US a pair ........... I go through about 2 pairs a year normally and the Danners I had lasted me 5 years with 2 resoles.
                          "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I wanted to get a pair of those 8" 5.11 Strike boots. They were the tactical style, but had the high shine toe like the classic paratroopers. However, they don't make them anymore
                            If you fail to plan, plan to fail.

                            "People look to you to dig them out of life threatening dung - that is an awesome responsibility and should be honoured with your blood and sweat in preparation for the day when you may have to work very hard to save someone you might not even know or like. If you are terrible at your job, somebody gets blinded/maimed/disfigured or killed."-Slack

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              whoa, where does everyone work that their boots need to shine?

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by hkbladelawhk View Post
                                whoa, where does everyone work that their boots need to shine?
                                Boots are like the tires/wheels on your car. Your car can be cleaned inside and out. But if your tires/wheels are dirty, it simply doesn't look good. If the uniform is cleaned and ironed and the boots are dirty and scuffed, it looks like crap. Boots must be cleaned and polished per our SOPS. One could be reprimanded for failure to meet the standards.

                                Be Safe,

                                Hank
                                " We are determined that before the sun sets on this terrible struggle, our flag will be recognized throughout the world as a symbol of freedom on one hand and of overwhelming force on the other" - General George C. Marshall

                                Comment

                                Leaderboard

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X