Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Fuel Saving measures?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fuel Saving measures?

    My company is looking for silly ways to save fuel.

    Right now, we have a 2002 Ford Explorer XLS and 2002 Chevrolet Blazer. You would think they would be useful for 4WD but since the Blazer is the only one with 4WD for the winter, I guess it doesnt matter. I was told they got the SUV's for high visibility. That makes no sense if you read further on what they have been sending us to demo lately. So right now we have a couple of gas hogs for no real reason.

    First they wanted us to get a John Deere Gator. I mentioned that we had one of those at my old job and it did not work out well due to engine noise (couldnt hear the 2-way radio), it was cold in the winter time, and generally unsafe if someone were to get into an accident. Its meant for off-road use, not in a busy parking lot for general patrol and not really visible. They ended up getting one for Housekeeping so they can clean the lots in the morning.

    Next they brought this Tiger Truck. This was worse! The thing looks like a 3rd grade project. The governor would kick in at 20 MPH and slow you down, without warning you or other drivers behind you, it was plauged with issues (linkage came apart from throttle, reverse lights did not work) for the week we had it for demo. Again, not meant for regular patrol and if someone were to get hit, they would be hurt or killed. Their response to what if someone got into an accident and hurt/killed was, "how often does that happen?"

    I say they go to the State of Ohio Vehicle Auction and snag a couple of retired Crown Victoria Police Interceptors formerly used by the State of Ohio for a fraction of the price. They have enough trunk space to store our gear and can be upfitted really nicely. They can also get the CVPI's or 9C1 Impalas (I am not a fan of the Impalas) elsewhere for still a fraction of the price. I get my CVPI through Ford and can trade it in so I get some kind of return. Putting a retired cruiser out there can be deter a potential crime if the car is spotted, and still gives us the stealthy advantage since it doesnt sit high and we would not need to refuel as much. Right now we refuel every other day. The Explorer goes to our special duty detail on the other side Columbus (about 25 miles away, each way) and the Blazer stays on property but the fuel guage is messed up so people think its almost on empty when its probably at half a tank. Our policy states we dont refuel until we are at 1/4 tank.

    How does my idea sound? Any ideas on anything better?
    Last edited by FireEMSPolice; 05-03-2007, 10:25 AM.
    "I am not a hero. I am a silent guardian, a watchful protector"

  • #2
    A few questions:

    1) Are you a contract company working for a mall property management group

    2) Do you work directly for the mall management group (inhouse)

    3) Is your mall owned by a national, regional or local group?

    How do you pay for fuel, on the company fleet card at any fuel station?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by FireEMSPolice
      My company is looking for silly ways to save fuel.

      Right now, we have a 2002 Ford Explorer XLS and 2002 Chevrolet Blazer. You would think they would be useful for 4WD but since the Blazer is the only one with 4WD for the winter, I guess it doesnt matter. I was told they got the SUV's for high visibility. That makes no sense if you read further on what they have been sending us to demo lately. So right now we have a couple of gas hogs for no real reason.

      First they wanted us to get a John Deere Gator. I mentioned that we had one of those at my old job and it did not work out well due to engine noise (couldnt hear the 2-way radio), it was cold in the winter time, and generally unsafe if someone were to get into an accident. Its meant for off-road use, not in a busy parking lot for general patrol and not really visible. They ended up getting one for Housekeeping so they can clean the lots in the morning.

      Next they brought this Tiger Truck. This was worse! The thing looks like a 3rd grade project. The governor would kick in at 20 MPH and slow you down, without warning you or other drivers behind you, it was plauged with issues (linkage came apart from throttle, reverse lights did not work) for the week we had it for demo. Again, not meant for regular patrol and if someone were to get hit, they would be hurt or killed. Their response to what if someone got into an accident and hurt/killed was, "how often does that happen?"

      I say they go to the State of Ohio Vehicle Auction and snag a couple of retired Crown Victoria Police Interceptors formerly used by the State of Ohio for a fraction of the price. They have enough trunk space to store our gear and can be upfitted really nicely. They can also get the CVPI's or 9C1 Impalas (I am not a fan of the Impalas) elsewhere for still a fraction of the price. I get my CVPI through Ford and can trade it in so I get some kind of return. Putting a retired cruiser out there can be deter a potential crime if the car is spotted, and still gives us the stealthy advantage since it doesnt sit high and we would not need to refuel as much. Right now we refuel every other day. The Explorer goes to our special duty detail on the other side Columbus (about 25 miles away, each way) and the Blazer stays on property but the fuel guage is messed up so people think its almost on empty when its probably at half a tank. Our policy states we dont refuel until we are at 1/4 tank.

      How does my idea sound? Any ideas on anything better?
      To directly answer your question - I think the State of Ohio auction in an excellent idea. The OSP vehicles are maintained well and have many years of service left in them. Many police agencies in Ohio buy these vehicles and use them for road duty.
      Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
      Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

      Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

      Comment


      • #4
        This is going to be a rambling post, so please bear with me.

        I have yet to do a real, detailed introduction post, so let me give you a little of my background. I double majored in college, studying Law Enforcement and Security Management. While attending college I started working security for an automobile manufacturer plant that was under construction. As the plant was being built our security department started taking EMS calls. As construction finished and production began we began taking on fire protection roles as well. It turned out that I enjoyed EMS/Fire (and security for that matter) more than police work. Not wanting to get involved with public law enforcement, I stuck with private services for the next eight years, taking on leadership and training roles at the few different places I've worked.

        Through my experiences I've learned a lot about security. I've learned what I saw as an officer, what I saw as management, and then when I left security, what I saw as a citizen. I can quickly tell you what departments are professional, and which ones are not. I can quickly tell which is a warm-body-site, and which one isn't.

        As I have traveled, for business and for pleasure, one of the things I have always sought out was the local malls. Malls are usually the safe place to go to get a feel for the community, a way to spend some time and sometimes grab something good to eat. With my experiences I'm always interested in checking out the security. There are three things that I always look at:
        • The age and health of the officers patrolling
        • The uniforms they are wearing
        • The type of vehicles they are patrolling in

        For now I'll stick with the last bullet point.

        At the automobile plant we drove trucks and SUVs. We were fortunate to be driving top of the line models. Most were the limited addition versions with leather, heated seats, sunroofs, power everything, you name it, it came with it. These not only provided comfort for those patrolling, but also hauled all of our gear and looked professional. They were also very safe and gave us great visibility when we were patrolling.

        When I see security patrolling in small, single cab pickups, some with flashing amber lights on top, some with nothing, I think they were purchased because they were the cheapest thing money could buy. When I see security patrolling in golf carts, Gators, or something else small and ridiculous, I think that management doesn't care about their officers. Now, don't get me wrong. Golf carts and Gators serve their purpose. They can get in and out off small areas quicker, are much easier to drive around parking garages, or if there is grass or dirt, a Gator is the way to go. But if that's the only vehicle a department is providing their officers (no real vehicle), then I feel real sorry for them. They are not protected from the elements and are not driving a safe vehicle.

        Say some teenager driving recklessly comes around the corner, maybe not in their own lane, hits an officer in a cart or buggy or something else. How injured will the officer be? So you say there has never been an accident on your site so that's not a good justification for a full size vehicle. How about this:

        How often is security going to go and patrol if it's raining like a siv, maybe storming out, or for our northern officers, snowing an inch an hour, driving a golf cart or Gator? Or a mini-truck with no heat? Probably not very much. And that's what they're paying officers for. Patrolling, being proactive, and responding to the needs of your clients, guests and customers.

        Do full size pickups and SUVs cost more money? Sure. Do they use more gas? Yep. Do they need more, regular preventive maintenance? Uh huh. Should that keep management from purchasing them? In my opinion, no. It's the cost of doing business. They provide better protection for the officers, usually make the officers feel better about themselves because they know management cares, and from my point a view, as a potential client or customer, something more pleasing on the eye. And I'd probably take the officer more seriously if I see them climb out of a clean, nice looking SUV than if they stepped out of a golf cart with rust covering the back and half the letters of 'SECURITY' either scratched or missing.

        Sorry for the long post, but vehicles are something I take very seriously.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by FireEMSPolice
          Our policy states we dont refuel until we are at 1/4 tank.
          Use caution, that'll bite you in the aft end at some point in time. Been there, done that.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Chimpie
            This is going to be a rambling post, so please bear with me.

            <snip>

            When I see security patrolling in small, single cab pickups, some with flashing amber lights on top, some with nothing, I think they were purchased because they were the cheapest thing money could buy. When I see security patrolling in golf carts, Gators, or something else small and ridiculous, I think that management doesn't care about their officers.
            1) This was not a rambling post by a long shot.

            2) It's not that they don't care, it's a money issue. Let's say you're mall management. Every store in the mall pays tribut, er, rent. Likewise with all the kiosks and other vendors. All the carnivals and assorted junk that sets up in the parking lots pay cashola for the privilege. Along comes security. Much like the janitorial staff, they need to be paid, and don't bring any money in. Why spend more money equipping them with a nice new CVPI or something, when you can cut your losses and get them a golf cart?

            Sure, you have to pay for janitorial staff, parking lot cleaning, etc. But they pretty much stay the same week in and week out. You KNOW what they're going to take off your bottom line. But those damn guards? Fuel costs differ every week...They could screw up and injure someone, causing a suit to be filed...They always whine about "training" for which you have to pay for an instructor...Screw them.

            Pay them as little as the law allows, grudgingly fork out a little money for a used golf cart, round file the "training" notion, and set them to work doing management's job, i.e. enforcing signage rules and gathering paperwork from vendors.

            The almighty dollar speaks louder than some outdated notion of "safety" these days, especially when the local cops are more likely than not to set up a substation of some sorts- free protection!

            I am compressing this heavily, but you get the general idea.
            Last edited by OccamsRazor; 05-03-2007, 01:20 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Having worked in a shopping mall, where they issued us a golf cart, I can give you a little insight on this from my perspective.

              Simply put, if they don't like the gas-hog SUVs, then they need to look at smaller cars. I personally don't like using foreign vehicles for law enforcement duties, (call me old-skool, or whatever.. lol), but something like a Subaru Forester would give you better mileage while still offering room for equipment. The golf carts/gators/etc. are accidents waiting to happen. And they DO. We had a couple incidents involving the cart while I worked for them.

              Something that hasn't been mentioned yet, that's especially effective with Summer coming up, is has the mall considered bike patrol? I convinced management at our mall to purchase a bike for us for the summer months. It's faster than a golf cart, can get into even smaller areas, and costs absolutely $0 for fuel. (Basically, I convinced them that the benefits FAR outweighed the cost of the bike and additional training)

              If you want any more info, let me know. I'll be glad to offer assistance if I can.
              Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
              Originally posted by ValleyOne
              BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
              Shoulda called in sick.
              Be safe!

              Comment


              • #8
                One CVPI and two bikes would be an excellent idea. The CVPI can be used as both patrol vehicle for inclement weather, and as a bike tender (rack on back) and carry-all.

                Do not forget that in addition to the substation, its reatively easy to hire off duty police officers who will bring their qualified immunity with them. Let the off-duty cop hurt people, its not like the mall can be sued! (Yes, it can...)

                I see many malls going with "two cops, eight guards." Where the security staff's sole purpose is to summon the mall's contract police force (off-duty local police), who will then use their police powers to enforce whatever law is being broken. (Usually trespassing, since the unarmed guards told the person to leave.)

                Unless the officer is politically suicidal, they can't enforce the rules of the mall, only the laws of the state. That's what the unarmed guards are for, advising people of the rules, then summoning the police officer when the rules are not obeyed and the person is ordered to leave.

                If the person refuses then, ha, off to jail they go. Or they get thrown through the door and told to leave again.

                On another tangent... SUVs are visible. But, too, the striping and "vehicle graphics" have to be eye-catching or else it looks like a joke. We have a vehicle that runs around Kenosha for "Kenosha Private Police." It is some kind of Kia SUV. It is grey. It has, in blue letters that you buy at K-Mart (the stick on kind), the words "KENOSHA PRIVATE POLICE" on both doors and the back. It has a little yellow "motorist distress" light that is also bought at K-Mart with about 10 candlepower attached to the top.

                This has never inspired confidence in anyone I've asked about it. Not that it says "POLICE," but that it looks like they outfitted their vehicle at K-Mart.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Charger
                  Having worked in a shopping mall, where they issued us a golf cart, I can give you a little insight on this from my perspective.

                  Simply put, if they don't like the gas-hog SUVs, then they need to look at smaller cars. I personally don't like using foreign vehicles for law enforcement duties, (call me old-skool, or whatever.. lol), but something like a Subaru Forester would give you better mileage while still offering room for equipment. The golf carts/gators/etc. are accidents waiting to happen. And they DO. We had a couple incidents involving the cart while I worked for them.

                  Something that hasn't been mentioned yet, that's especially effective with Summer coming up, is has the mall considered bike patrol? I convinced management at our mall to purchase a bike for us for the summer months. It's faster than a golf cart, can get into even smaller areas, and costs absolutely $0 for fuel. (Basically, I convinced them that the benefits FAR outweighed the cost of the bike and additional training)

                  If you want any more info, let me know. I'll be glad to offer assistance if I can.
                  Training? What training? You put the guard on the bike, he rides around, he locks the bike up when he's done with it.

                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There's been significant criminological research about the effect that the police cruiser has had with police-community relations. Most often it is felt that the cruiser serves as a physical barrier, separating and alienating the officers from the community they were. Since security guards are often promoted as a way for citizens/property users to be able to better maintain relations with those who were ensuring their safety, companies are often reluctant to introduce physical barriers such as cruisers.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Another fuel saving idea would be to use motorcycles. I believe one contract security company in the Seattle area used a motorcycle some time back (before we had the hike in gas prices). At 45+ miles per gallon, it makes fairly good sense. Granted, you don’t have the same storage space of a sedan, but you do have the fuel economy. Officers could be issued PDA’s to keep track of their activities.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by LPCap
                        A few questions:

                        1) Are you a contract company working for a mall property management group

                        2) Do you work directly for the mall management group (inhouse)

                        3) Is your mall owned by a national, regional or local group?

                        How do you pay for fuel, on the company fleet card at any fuel station?
                        To answer the questions:

                        1) We are in-house and the company that owns the mall I work in owns 25 others and other various properties nationwide.

                        2) Again, in-house

                        3) It is owned by a local company and owns other properties nationwide.

                        4) We have a fleet card for BP. It has to be refueled & washed at BP

                        Also, motorcycles are out of the question and would not be practical. We have a couple of Smith & Wesson bikes.
                        "I am not a hero. I am a silent guardian, a watchful protector"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Get rid of BP for starters. At least in this area they are always the highest gas around by a large amount too. It's who we use as well and we've been telling management for months to change it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            This is wha the By-law enforcement people used to drive in my borough http://policecanada.policecanada.org...unQC003_PB.jpg

                            This is what they drive now in order to save money http://policecanada.policecanada.org...unQC004_NF.jpg

                            (2nd photo taken by me!)
                            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The only reason we use BP is because its on the corner. I cannot do anything to change that at all.

                              How would I go about asking for a change in vehicles? Of course I would have to present stats, etc.
                              "I am not a hero. I am a silent guardian, a watchful protector"

                              Comment

                              Leaderboard

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X