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  • Flashlight options

    Hi folks. I work as an unarmed security officer at a biotech facility in Maryland. I have thought about replacing my AA mini Mag Lite with something a little more powerful. My current idea is to get a Streamlight Stinger.

    Anybody have experience with this flashlight or have a personal preference?

  • #2
    That is a very good choice.
    I really wish you would get that light if no other.
    Otherwise, go check out www.candlepowerforums.com to learn even more about making your job really fun with flashlights.

    By the way, i have worked as an armed guard and still relied heavily on a good-a$$ flashlight.
    Observe and report what you saw with a good flashlight.
    Bedtime at sunrise

    Comment


    • #3
      If you want stock, I suggest a Streamlight Strion over the Stinger. Why? Because I need a ginnea pig... I mean, um, its smaller than the stinger, and therefore weighs less and works on a belt better.

      Due note, if you go packing a 9 inch flashlight on your regular trouser belt, you will quickly note it slides around, jabs into you, etc. I always suggest buying a Uncle Mikes or DutyPro (www.qmuniforms.com) 2 1/2 nylon duty belt to carry a belt mounted flashlight on. You may already have one, working biotech, for a radio and/or gloves.

      Wearing duty rig accessories on a trouser belt not only looks stupid, IMHO, it will definately eat your belt into shreds.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll take a look at it

        I'll take a look at the Strion. Didn't really consider it. I have to agree with you that it looks silly to have 20 equipment pouches on a regular trouser belt. Fortunately, I don't need to wear a duty rig...so the compact powerful light idea might work well.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by wvd1979
          I'll take a look at the Strion. Didn't really consider it. I have to agree with you that it looks silly to have 20 equipment pouches on a regular trouser belt. Fortunately, I don't need to wear a duty rig...so the compact powerful light idea might work well.
          When carrying my Stinger (Original) outside of work, I'd back pocket it. I liked it because its a good light, its considered a "workmans light," so its not weird for a private citizen to carry one, and it also came in handy as an impact weapon/control tool if needs be, like a super kubaton.

          But, generally, when your going to stick a 9 inch light on your waist, you need a case for it. And unless you use a RippOff case, or find a regular case, they're all made for duty and/or contractor belts, at 2 inches wide.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

          Comment


          • #6
            ASP holder works well with Stingers

            Actually, when I worked security at a college one of the campus safety guys carried his Stinger in an ASP baton holder. They're about the same diameter so it worked pretty well for him.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by wvd1979
              Actually, when I worked security at a college one of the campus safety guys carried his Stinger in an ASP baton holder. They're about the same diameter so it worked pretty well for him.
              Awhile back, ASP made the original Sidebreak Scabbard. This is the one that didn't rotate, and the polymer was more pliable.

              What alot of us, and by us, I mean security, police, and deputies, would do was hit a store, buy ALL their sidebreak scabbards, and then use them for both baton and Stinger holder. The gun stores in the area couldn't keep up.

              Now, here's the reason why. You put your baton behind your gun, and your stinger behind your radio. Both of em are perfectly situated to draw using the "That's so not covered by your warranty" method.

              Grap your baton, or the head of your stinger, and pull it sharply down and sideways. The sidebreak scabbard will let the baton or flashlight body through the center opening, creating this very loud "SNAP" sound. This was extremely quick, usually extended the baton rigid when drawn as such, and made this horrible snapping sound that intimidated people.

              I understand the new rotational scabbards have a denser polymer that will rip the grip right off an ASP Federal baton.
              Some Kind of Commando Leader

              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

              Comment


              • #8
                To be honest i find that the maglite 4D cell works fine, lights up the area quicky and brightly so i use that, on my rig belt from left i have radio, speedcuffs, phone holder,rigid tri hinged cuffs (middle back rear) then at ma right aiming towards ma left as i am left handed asp 21" extenable

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by aaron
                  To be honest i find that the maglite 4D cell works fine, lights up the area quicky and brightly so i use that, on my rig belt from left i have radio, speedcuffs, phone holder,rigid tri hinged cuffs (middle back rear) then at ma right aiming towards ma left as i am left handed asp 21" extenable
                  The idea is not to spend hundreds of dollars on D cell batteries. And yet, again, more with the illegal offensive weapon. And a small one, at that.
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I carry a Stinger myself, and swear by it for duty work... I haven't tried the Strion or any of the other new lights yet, but when I was shopping for a light a few years ago everyone I talked to said that the best ones out there were Stingers and the line of tactical lights made by Surefire.... You might wanna look into those, because a lot of them are smaller than the Stinger, and might work better for you...

                    Another note on carrying, If you're one of those lucky guys whose department gets the trousers with the SAP pockets in the back (the little extra pockets below the regular ones) you can carry it in there... I did that alot with my previous company, and it was a LOT more comfortable than the belt holder...
                    Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
                    Originally posted by ValleyOne
                    BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
                    Shoulda called in sick.
                    Be safe!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bridgegate
                      I carry a Stinger myself, and swear by it for duty work... I haven't tried the Strion or any of the other new lights yet, but when I was shopping for a light a few years ago everyone I talked to said that the best ones out there were Stingers and the line of tactical lights made by Surefire.... You might wanna look into those, because a lot of them are smaller than the Stinger, and might work better for you...

                      Another note on carrying, If you're one of those lucky guys whose department gets the trousers with the SAP pockets in the back (the little extra pockets below the regular ones) you can carry it in there... I did that alot with my previous company, and it was a LOT more comfortable than the belt holder...
                      The problem with Surefire is that your paying hundreds of dollars for those little lithium batteries. I used to carry a surefire. 6P, I think it was. The lithium batteries DIED (They were full charge) when a freeze hit. The temp was about 25 degrees outside, and boom, turned on my surefire, and got about 2 minutes out of it.
                      Some Kind of Commando Leader

                      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Wow... wasn't aware they were that temperature sensitive... Good to know!
                        Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
                        Originally posted by ValleyOne
                        BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
                        Shoulda called in sick.
                        Be safe!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                          The problem with Surefire is that your paying hundreds of dollars for those little lithium batteries. I used to carry a surefire. 6P, I think it was. The lithium batteries DIED (They were full charge) when a freeze hit. The temp was about 25 degrees outside, and boom, turned on my surefire, and got about 2 minutes out of it.
                          I've always bought the batteries direct from Surefire's website...12 of them for $15 is a far better deal than a retail store. Never had the temp problem though, and I've used them at -60* (I don't EVEN wanna know what the windchill was).

                          Best set-up I ever used was the poly-body Streamlight (SL-20?), with the Stinger backing it up, and a Surefire G2 as a last-resort...Then I met the 'Aviator', and all was lost, heh.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you can find the right Chinese online dealer, you can even find those batteries cheaper still from where they are often made,
                            China.
                            I have yet to experience a problem with any of the lithium cr123's related to temperature.
                            Every single one I have had worked like a champ so far.

                            Where did you get those batteries from and what brand were they?

                            The Surefire brand has had a mixed reputation.
                            No plans here to buy any on my end as a result.
                            Most other major brands have usually done well.
                            Observe and report what you saw with a good flashlight.
                            Bedtime at sunrise

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              This is a piece written while federally employed. You may find it of some use.

                              ?The Common Battery?

                              Both the government and the private sector use a lot of batteries in the performance of their varied roles in providing products and services. The purpose of this article is to inform readers on the selection criteria used when buying a battery, regardless of type, i.e., primary cell (lithium, alkaline, mercury and carbon-zinc) or secondary cell, the rechargeable kind.

                              When a battery-operated device stops working properly or works sporadically, we open it up and replace the battery. If the device has fails repeatedly, we throw the device away without another thought. Simple solution, right? No, not always. In many instances, the wrong battery was used initially to power the device or a wrong replacement was chosen.

                              From flashlights to smoke detectors to whatever, circuit designers design a device to operate at special impedance or more accurately, with matched impedance from a particular power source.

                              Before we go any further ? ?What is impedance matching?? Impedance matching is the connecting across a source impedance, the battery, to another impedance, the load (hand-held metal detectors, flashlights, pagers, portable radios, and so forth), having the same magnitude and phase angle or other circuit characteristics.

                              If you notice battery usage increase for a particular device or group of devices, the suggested method to overcome this problem is correct battery replacement. Order only those batteries specified by the manufacturer as written in the device?s operating instructions. Specific instructions to the procurement or supply personnel should be: ?No substitutions allowed without the expressed WRITTEN permission from the action officer.?

                              If batteries are on sale at a remarkable price, or we?ll cut-a-deal= forgetting the pitfalls, the problem rests entirely on our shoulders.

                              When purchasing batteries, we must also consider shelf life. The correct definition of shelf life is: ?The length of time under very specific conditions at which a battery retains its suitability.? We should not be overly surprised if the label states: ?Shelf life 18 months from date of manufacture, stored at 70o Fahrenheit, with 50% humidity,? buying them two years after the date stamped on the carton.

                              To add insult to injury, we buy batteries from a store whose temperature and humidity rival a South American jungle, after six months storage in a refrigerator, one week after installation we discover the device stops working. We become upset because the battery leaked and ruined the device, or at best, made a mess hard to clean up.

                              Secondary cells, rechargeable types, require the same degree of selectivity; however, their operation and performance are different from the primary cell. Some older designed secondary cells develop memory, that is, if not totally discharged from time to time, they will not fully charge. If left in a re-charger unit and used in that same fashion, the secondary cell will not be properly exercised, deteriorate rapidly, necessitating needless replacement. The newer generations of secondary cells develop memory at a slower rate than the older ones. Rule of thumb, ?Follow the manufacturer?s instructions in all instances.?

                              Enjoy the day,
                              Bill

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