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  • Equipment And Resources

    Ok heres something that i wanna know,

    What equipment do u carry:

    asp,OC,Taser,Cuffs etc.

    Do you have a car with warning lights if so what,

    Can you take your car home and can you have lights on your POV if applicable.

    Also what does your county say about using ure lights and sirens on public roads if you gotta get into work quickly

  • #2
    And, along the same lines, anyone equipped with night vision devices? (I already know their $$$$$$, but still...)
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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    • #3
      When I worked for a private security company in Florida:


      Everything on my duty rig was purchased by the employee. Armed employees may, depending on personnel jacket, be loaned a duty weapon for a period of up to 60 days. After the 60th day, they must provide their own authorized duty weapon, or forfeit armed status.

      Authorized equipment included handcuffs, ASP, PR-24, Straight Stick, Flashlight, Revolver, Speedloaders, Pepper Spray or OC/CS (not exceeding 10% OC concentration), duty utility knife or leatherman tool, and flexible restraints.

      The company maintained a patrol division consisting of one vehicle, which was operated by the patrol supervisor (highest or second highest ranking uniform in the field). At times, the company maintained one or two patrol accounts where officers would drive on property, or multiple properties. Most times, the client was required to furnish a vehicle if the account required one - not the company.

      Security companies in Florida are restricted by FSS 493 in light color. They may display amber only. Sirens are authorized for emergency vehicles only, putting one in a security company car is tantamount to impersonating law enforcement, a felony. Poesssion of a siren is illegal, on or off city roads. Only law enforcement, EMS, and Fire have a need, legally, to respond to a scene with due urgency.

      There is no difference between a company vehicle and a personally owned vehicle. Both are private individual's vehicles, and can have an amber light. It is considered a flasher, basically, like your hazard signals. They may only be run on private property, except when patrolling public roads on residential complexes. Anywhere else, its a traffic ticket unless warning of a hazard.

      Some companies give out take home cars. Most do not, as the more its driven, the more likely it gets into an accident, and the insurance carrier usually will NOT cover the incident - because its not being used on company business (To and from work is not company business to an insurance company). This means you have to get a blanket policy, which increases the cost of the insurance.

      Just about every state says that there is no reason that you should get into or out of "work" quickly, unless you are a public authority, such as a police officer. DC, Maryland, and Virginia excluded.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Mr. Security
        And, along the same lines, anyone equipped with night vision devices? (I already know their $$$$$$, but still...)
        Older night vision isn't that expensive, actually, considering. If you can make enough clients cough up the cash, you can give people anything you want.
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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        • #5
          cool and thanks for the reply any other items you lot carry?

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          • #6
            N.A. pretty much covered the sum of it... but I'll give you my list as well....

            Starting on the front, going counter-clockwise..

            ASP expandable baton (Held horizontally)
            Silent key holder
            Radio holder
            Stinger XT Flashlight

            (Backside)
            Single cuffs
            Latex gloves/small medkit
            Single cuffs

            Leatherman multitool
            *When armed: Walther P99 in Uncle Mikes Pro-3 holster
            Punch II OC Spray Mk3 size
            *When armed: Double mag pouch

            When armed I carry my cell/pager in a pocket... when unarmed, I carry it on the front right where my mag pouch normally sits...

            Hope this helps!
            Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
            Originally posted by ValleyOne
            BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
            Shoulda called in sick.
            Be safe!

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            • #7
              You know, it may be in the forum archives now, but I had a listing of everything on my duty rig, left to right (I'm left handed).
              Some Kind of Commando Leader

              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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              • #8
                Company provides 2 pants, 2 shirts, badge, ball style cap and jacket. Armed officers are additionally issed a leather holster and when they gwt on post and make releif they are issued the company owned .38 special revolver from the officer going off duty. EMTs are required to provide their own blood pressure cuff and stethoscope. No OC, batons or cuffs here.
                Yes I have an old set of Russian made Gen 1 night vision binos I bought years ago but have never used them on the job.
                Hospital Security Officer

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by EMTGuard
                  Company provides 2 pants, 2 shirts, badge, ball style cap and jacket. Armed officers are additionally issed a leather holster and when they gwt on post and make releif they are issued the company owned .38 special revolver from the officer going off duty. EMTs are required to provide their own blood pressure cuff and stethoscope. No OC, batons or cuffs here.
                  Yes I have an old set of Russian made Gen 1 night vision binos I bought years ago but have never used them on the job.
                  Wait. "You" have a gun, a holster, and that's it? Does the holster fit onto your trouser belt, or do they provide a 2 inch or 2 1/4 inch duty belt to fit the holster on?

                  I've heard about things like this before. This means that the armed guard has two force options. Verbal, and lethal.

                  Silly question: Are the guns loaded? (I'm serious.) Has it been verified they're loaded with actual ammunition with actual primers in them? Do the pistols have firing pins in the hammers? Have the firing pins been shaved off to prevent a discharge?

                  All of the above things have happened in states, which required the states to make legislation preventing these things. Toy guns because "guns are expensive, and just a visual deterrant," unloaded / demilitarized guns to give "visual deterrance, without liability," etc.

                  Without handcuffs, mace, batons, or other weapons, basically, you can ignore them, yell at them, or kill them. Those are your options. Sounds like the armored car industry.
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                  • #10
                    Not me personally. I'm unarmed for the time being. But yes, the armed guys get a holster and gun loaded with 6 .38 special lead nose ball type bullets. I've spoken with a couple of the armed guys and they all tell me that's how it works. Yes the guns fire and have live ammo so that's not a problem.
                    I sometimes work with an unarmed officer who used to be armed but isn't anymore. He doesn't see much point in having the gun because of the way company policy and the laws are set up. There's very little you can legally use the gun for including preventing a deadly assault. He tells me of the time he worked with an armed officer who was working a post when a couple of truck drivers started fighting. One driver got a crowbar and was smashing away at the other driver and the Security Officer tryied to intervine by giving verbal orders to "STOP". When he kept swinging away the Officer shot the assailant to keep him from killing the other driver. The Security Officer ended up killing the guy and going to prison for manslaugther. So after that my partner realized that there's to much liability and not enough legal protection, at least in this state, to be working for this company and being armed. I can see his point.
                    Hospital Security Officer

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by EMTGuard
                      Not me personally. I'm unarmed for the time being. But yes, the armed guys get a holster and gun loaded with 6 .38 special lead nose ball type bullets. I've spoken with a couple of the armed guys and they all tell me that's how it works. Yes the guns fire and have live ammo so that's not a problem.
                      I sometimes work with an unarmed officer who used to be armed but isn't anymore. He doesn't see much point in having the gun because of the way company policy and the laws are set up. There's very little you can legally use the gun for including preventing a deadly assault. He tells me of the time he worked with an armed officer who was working a post when a couple of truck drivers started fighting. One driver got a crowbar and was smashing away at the other driver and the Security Officer tryied to intervine by giving verbal orders to "STOP". When he kept swinging away the Officer shot the assailant to keep him from killing the other driver. The Security Officer ended up killing the guy and going to prison for manslaugther. So after that my partner realized that there's to much liability and not enough legal protection, at least in this state, to be working for this company and being armed. I can see his point.
                      Like I said. You have three options: Ignore, Talk, and Kill. Security guards are held by the legal professional to about the same use of force standards that law enforcement officers are. LEOs require to have multiple levels of force so that they can articulate that they tried to use various methods of non-lethal force, if possible, before they shoot someone.

                      In that case, I'm surprised it wasn't brought up that the guard didn't have any other methods of force available to him. But, the way it sounds down there, he was probally told "you should of called the police, that isn't a security guard's place to stop attack," and hit with the charge.
                      Some Kind of Commando Leader

                      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        oh my god

                        Ok i suggest you speak to ure emplyer and get them to get you a 21" asp, OC or Mace, Taser, and couple of pairs of cuffs that way if you feel that a situation is escalating then you will be able to decide on the best method possible to de-escalate the situation.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by aaron
                          oh my god

                          Ok i suggest you speak to ure emplyer and get them to get you a 21" asp, OC or Mace, Taser, and couple of pairs of cuffs that way if you feel that a situation is escalating then you will be able to decide on the best method possible to de-escalate the situation.

                          You missed the point where in Lousiana, where the man works, they're not allowed to carry any of those things, did you not?
                          Some Kind of Commando Leader

                          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Again, from the official regulations at http://www.state.la.us/osr/lac/46v59/46v59.pdf -
                            E. Authorized Weapons. The following weapons are the
                            only weapons authorized and approved by the board:
                            1. straight baton or PR-24 baton;
                            2. .357 caliber revolver, minimum four inch barrel
                            with .357 or .38 caliber ammunition or .38 caliber revolver,
                            minimum four inch barrel with .38 caliber ammunition only;
                            3. 9mm semiautomatic, minimum four inch barrel,
                            double action; and
                            4. shotgun;
                            5. 40 caliber weapon, minimum 4-inch barrel.

                            There's no mention of OC, Tazers or ASPs. None needed where I am either. I answer phones, Sign weight tickets of trucks coming across our scales into the plant, sign in contracters, do piss tests when someone damages something or someone, splint fingers, arms and legs, transport the occasional injury to the hospital and hopefully get through the shift without getting a flat tire on the Medical Van.
                            Hospital Security Officer

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                            • #15
                              Interesting. It was either in Security Dealer, Security Design and Technology, or SecurityInfoWatch, but someone was noting that in the era of "do it yourself" urinalysis and breathalizer testing for non-LE incidents, the human resources department would be extremely well off by having a security officer either present during the testing to maintain order, or have the security department do all the testing.

                              This allows a designated shift point of contact for all HIPPA/Chain of Custody/EEOC laws, maintains order when people "don't like" the results of their positive test, and preserves the safety of the employee and samples from attack or adulteration.

                              The article, I did note, suggests less of an "observe and report," and more of a "protect life and property" concept. Just having the security officer stand there and call 911 when the HR person is being attacked is no better than having another HR associate standing there.
                              Some Kind of Commando Leader

                              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                              Comment

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