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  • Shotgun Qualifying Tips.

    I have a question for everyone. I will need to qualify with a 12 Gauge Shotgun, with #8 Buckshot. 5 Shoulder, 5 Hip, firing for ricochet. My question is, what are the best ways to minimize recoil, or "kick".

    Not a huge shotgun fan, and not a big recoil fan... any suggestions are greatly appreciated.
    "What if this is as good as it gets?" ~ Melvin Udall

  • #2
    Don't know what options you have to practice, or choice of shotguns you have.

    Practice is really the biggest thing for reducing recoil aversion. The recoil problem can really only be conquered by becoming aclimatized or accustomed to it and being taught proper technique. These things reduce both the surprise and the needless "punch" from recoil that make the problem worse than it needs to be. Hopefully, you might be able to accustom yourself to the shotgun in a "graduated" way, but in any case the more time you get to shoot, the better.

    By "graduated" practice, I mean that I've trained people who are particularly "recoil-averse", including kids and women, to handle the 12-ga by starting them on the 20-ga first, and then after 100 rounds or so moving them to very light 12-ga loads, etc. Of course, this takes a little time and money, but it's quite effective. A range near you might be able to let you shoot a 20-ga if you don't own one or have a friend who does.

    Choice of shotgun also matters, as do some possible gun mods like recoil pads (Pachmayr Decelerator, Kick-Eeze, LimbSavr, etc.)...and there are slip-on versions of some of these pads if you can't or don't want to install one. Gas-operated shotguns like the Remington 1100 or Beretta Xtrema 2 (which also has an effective gel antirecoil pad) would certainly be recommended over fixed-breech. There are many gas-operated guns other than those mentioned above, of course. Finally, the heavier the gun the better, everything else being equal.

    Some other gun features that are touted to reduce recoil, such as porting, are much less effective, if at all.

    The big thing, as I said before, is time with the gun. You'll find that the problem diminishes inversely with the number of shots you fire, more than anything else. You'll probably never relish the shotgun due to the recoil - and I have strong opinions about whether it is really a good option for a patrol weapon except in certain very limited situations anyway (an argument for another time), but qualifying with the shotgun will probably never go away.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 12-31-2006, 06:48 AM.
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    • #3
      know the weapon

      SecTrainer hit it on the mark. Really is no way to elminate practice. Like real estate says location, location. location. Quals need practice, practice, practice. Also learn your weapon inside and out, be able to work it blindfolded. Become the weapon.

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      • #4
        Just a couple of quick points.
        Hold the buttstock firmly against your shoulder.
        Weak arm elbow is pointing down.
        Front knee is bent, rear leg straight, and lean your body slightly foward. This will absorb some of the recoil.
        Make pulling the trigger and pumping another round all one motion keeping the gun "hot".

        Don't let the firearms instructor see your pain.
        Last edited by T202; 12-31-2006, 12:46 PM.

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        • #5
          you can look for an knoxx specops adjustable stock, they run about $130 bucks but eliminate a great deal of recoil, i have one on my mossberg 500

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          • #6
            Well, if it's of any help to know.....

            #8 Buckshot is actually NOT buckshot. It's birdshot, used mostly for small game such as squirrels, and dove. It has very little recoil. It also spreads "like a bastard" and you should have no problem hitting anything with it, even with a full choke. I'm curious, why are you qualifying with such a light load? Is this more of a "familiarization"? If you intend to shoot a bad guy with it, I would seriously consider using 00 buck, 000 buck, or even slugs. Just my worthless opinion. Hope it helps.

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            • #7
              I am qualifying for the Department of Corrections. I was told it will be #8... may be heavier, I don't know for sure. From what I am told... we fire for Ricochet instead of direct hit.. so... who knows.
              "What if this is as good as it gets?" ~ Melvin Udall

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              • #8
                I'll bet its Tac 8 rounds.

                http://www.remingtonle.com/ammo/ss_tac8.htm

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SecureTN
                  I am qualifying for the Department of Corrections. I was told it will be #8... may be heavier, I don't know for sure. From what I am told... we fire for Ricochet instead of direct hit.. so... who knows.
                  Too bad you can't use rock-salt. Burns really bad, but it usually isn't lethal. Farmers used it (old days) on vagrants and others who pilfered their fruits/vegetables. It would certainly break-up an exercise area fight/attack.
                  Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                  • #10
                    For 12 yrs I qualified annually with the 870 Remington. If you do as instructed, the recoil will not be a great bother, even with slugs. I have seen many people struggle with this, but like others said practice and become very familiar with the shotgun. I am not a large person at all, and was never bothered, in fact the 870 was my favorite weapon.
                    Murphy was an optomist.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jeff194307
                      For 12 yrs I qualified annually with the 870 Remington. If you do as instructed, the recoil will not be a great bother, even with slugs. I have seen many people struggle with this, but like others said practice and become very familiar with the shotgun. I am not a large person at all, and was never bothered, in fact the 870 was my favorite weapon.
                      The 870 is what we use, with buckshot police rounds (reduced powder charge but good for 30 yards). In some of my assignments, like night time in the middle of nowhere, I would prefer the 870 over a handgun.

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