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  • fortsmithman
    replied
    Looks like my uniform at the hotel In work is changing from a tan shirt in summer, and white shirt in winter to a year round dark navy shirt with Security epaulet slipons. It still won’t have any other patches saying security. Up here the police which is the RCMP wear a silver grey uniform shirt so the shirt colour will not be the same as the police.
    Last edited by fortsmithman; 12-20-2017, 08:39 AM.

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  • fortsmithman
    replied
    My uniform for my as and when needed job at the Govt run hospital is a dark navy uniform shirt with security patches on both sleeves with either dark navy cargo pants, or dark navy patrol shorts.

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  • Consolewatcher
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    Yeah, I know. The fact is, though, that security is an enforcement position that we presume must sometimes need to take enforcement actions (enforcing "rules" rather than "laws" but still enforcement).

    People should never be confused by the way security is dressed as to who the hell this person is that's telling them what to do (or not do). You don't have to "look like law enforcement" to be clearly identified as a security officer, nor is there any good reason for an organization that uses UNIFORMED security officers to wish for them to look like UPS drivers or janitors. It only detracts from their effectiveness. (Not talking here about venues that use plain-clothes folks, in which case their dress makes sense.)

    It's like the doctor gives you a prescription for sleeping pills. You're supposed to take 2 pills at night, but you take only 1, and then you lie awake bitching that the medicine isn't strong enough.

    If you use uniformed security, let the uniform in some way clearly identify them AS security, whether by patch, badge or whatever. Or else why don't you just go ahead put them in white aprons with a chef's hat so people can mistake them for the Pillsbury Dough Boy. Or how about a cleric's collar? Or scrubs?

    Geesh!

    And that's the end of my song.
    Fair enough, though it could be argued that all is required is for the person to be identifiable as someone who works at the building. After all, generally speaking a security guard's authority to enforce rules comes from the fact that he or she is acting on behalf of the owner ("security" is a job title, not a legal status). People who aren't security enforce rules all the time.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Yeah, I know. The fact is, though, that security is an enforcement position that we presume must sometimes need to take enforcement actions (enforcing "rules" rather than "laws" but still enforcement).

    People should never be confused by the way security is dressed as to who the hell this person is that's telling them what to do (or not do). You don't have to "look like law enforcement" to be clearly identified as a security officer, nor is there any good reason for an organization that uses UNIFORMED security officers to wish for them to look like UPS drivers or janitors. It only detracts from their effectiveness. (Not talking here about venues that use plain-clothes folks, in which case their dress makes sense.)

    It's like the doctor gives you a prescription for sleeping pills. You're supposed to take 2 pills at night, but you take only 1, and then you lie awake bitching that the medicine isn't strong enough.

    If you use uniformed security, let the uniform in some way clearly identify them AS security, whether by patch, badge or whatever. Or else why don't you just go ahead put them in white aprons with a chef's hat so people can mistake them for the Pillsbury Dough Boy. Or how about a cleric's collar? Or scrubs?

    Geesh!

    And that's the end of my song.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 09-29-2017, 02:11 PM.

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  • Consolewatcher
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post

    No name tag, no identifying patch. If not for those epaulets you'd look like a delivery driver.

    Just sayin'...
    I've seen plenty of sites where the client doesn't want their guard to look like security guards (or law enforcement). They want a more "generic uniformed company representative" type of uniform. One site I saw had their guards wearing white military-style shirts with black uniform pants. The shirts had only the name of the site on it and black shoulderboards with the name of the site on them. I would have mistaken them for maintenance people if I didn't know that maintenance people wouldn't wear white for practical reasons (dirt, grime, etc...)

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  • Ingio Montoya
    replied
    The best uniform I ever wore who's won at work for HSS. I was at a propane storage facility so everything had to be all cotton. We had tan 5.11 pants and royal blue 511 Polo. It was the most comfortable uniform I ever wore.

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  • Condo Guard
    replied
    I've never liked the epaulets - they just never looked right to me. Hardway, I agree with your opinion on the blue line flag - probably good intentions, but as a civilian I would think, "Wannabe." (I don't mind the black bands on security badges when a local police officer is lost - it is a sign of respect.)

    We recently had a contract security co. at one of the high end shops on the property where I work, and they never got it right. First guy sent out was in the hard uniform, sitting on a folding chair - he lasted a day. Second guy sent out was at least in a polo shirt and slacks, but he's a wearing a different color long sleeve shirt underneath and a cap inside the store. Seriously?

    If I'm putting a guard in a store that sells $300 beauty products, he's going to be in a suit and tie, or a low key polo and slacks that looks professional.

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  • fortsmithman
    replied
    This is a picture of what I wore about 3 years ago. The only thing that indicated me being security is the security guard badge clipped to my belt.

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  • fortsmithman
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post

    No name tag, no identifying patch. If not for those epaulets you'd look like a delivery driver.

    Just sayin'...
    I wish I was a delivery driver i would be making more money if I was. That's is my spring/summer uniform. My fall/winter uniform is dark blue cargo pants, white uniform shirt with the same security epaulette slip ons, with clip on neck tie. No patches or name plate.
    Last edited by fortsmithman; 09-29-2017, 09:44 PM.

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  • Hardway
    replied
    The contract firm I'm with part-time has added the 'Thin Blue Line' flag to its issued polo and Class A shirts since I started there.

    The stuff I was issued came from old stock and carries a standard, full-color flag patch, which I'm glad about.

    I'm uncomfortable with the altered/politicized flag itself, and the adoption of a police-identity emblem on a security uniform. I suppose it's meant by the owner as a gesture of support, but it comes off to me as something on the spectrum between ingratiation and impersonation/stolen valor.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by fortsmithman View Post
    Here is me in my uniform at work.
    No name tag, no identifying patch. If not for those epaulets you'd look like a delivery driver.

    Just sayin'...

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post
    For general security work I'd say a black polo shirt with tan cargo pants. For formal uniform work (say, office building day shift) navy blue or black suit, black tie, white "civilian" type shirt.
    Can't agree with the suit except perhaps in certain "special" venues (such as security for a house of worship, perhaps a society wedding or other formal event, etc).

    Usually, it's more desirable for the security uniform to be distinctive and recognizable as such, and to be appropriate for the job in terms of durability, comfort, maintenance, etc. If a situation calls for something less casual than polos/slacks, less "military" than BDUs, etc., - for instance, security at an art museum - rather than a suit I'd go with something like a navy blazer with grey slacks - and a small discreet patch on the blazer breast pocket or a lanyard ID that clearly identifies the security officer as such.

    If a security officer is interfacing with the public, the public shouldn't wonder who he is. In an office building such as you mention, a security officer in a suit and tie would just look like lots of other people who work in the building.

    The other reason for security to be recognizable is so that people can easily obtain assistance, directions, etc. And on a practical note, suits are expensive to buy and both expensive and inconvenient to maintain. Blazer/slacks much less so, and more versatile.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 09-11-2017, 09:52 AM.

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  • Consolewatcher
    replied
    For general security work I'd say a black polo shirt with tan cargo pants. For formal uniform work (say, office building day shift) navy blue or black suit, black tie, white "civilian" type shirt.

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  • fortsmithman
    replied
    Here is my uniform again except it needs to be ironed.

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  • fortsmithman
    replied
    Here is me in my uniform at work.

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