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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Maybe they think the insurance will cover reparing the sign. Maybe they just don't care.
    They think it won't happen. Maybe it will, maybe it won't. Not my problem anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Maybe they think the insurance will cover reparing the sign. Maybe they just don't care.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Proactive Security? What's That?

    I made a suggestion that another camera be installed near the road where the sites expensive sign is located to catch any youths who might paintball it. (That's the latest mischief in this area)

    Idea rejected; too expensive. Tell me, what costs more? Replacing/repairing a huge fancy sign or installing another camera? Good Grief.

    Leave a comment:


  • boes1970
    replied
    Yes Sir

    No 1 is for the client

    No 2 is for our headoffice

    And a copie is saved in our files at the securityroom where we work.

    greets Maikel

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Do you keep your own copies of things you have reported to your company?

    Leave a comment:


  • boes1970
    replied
    I have to agree with the sgt.

    We have a companypolicy that every security-suggestion or problem is reported on paper. Not only to the company where we preform our duty but olso to our headoffice.

    It happened to often that the blame was on us when things went wrong. Even now, they try it. We put a warning on paper about a view missing emerency-signals. And nobody took care of it. A view days later we had a fire and people afterwards complained that they wheren't able to locate the escaperoute properly.

    Thank God everybody came out without any harm and the officer on duty managed to keep the fire under control till the firedept. arrivered.

    And a couple of days later there was a complain from the client. We didn't report to him about the missing signals...........

    May I present to you the report we had send to you.........

    So please mister client, be so kind and take the heat yourself!

    And now, everythings, how minor the matter.........written on paper!

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    One of the biggest things I was taught was: If you make a claim, know how to back it up, in writing. If the client does not wish those services performed, then they put that in their contract. That's great, we said we'd do it for any client, and they refused.

    "Waah, you didn't deploy a K-9 like your site said you could and the bad guy who killed my hot secretary got away."

    Well, while we do have detection dogs available to selected patrol and static clients, you did choose the option of "I do not want NAPSOA PSG to bring to or use on my properties a detection or protection animal." So, you're out of luck there, skippy.

    Leave a comment:


  • hrdickinson
    replied
    Cheap Clients

    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    How many times have you made a simple, inexpensive suggestion to a client to improve safety and/or security, only to have them reject the recommendation?

    Recently, I pointed out to a client that the facility lacks no trespassing signs which means that if someone is injured while bicycle riding, etc., they could try to sue because they believed that it was OK to be on the property. The client, who doesn't think twice about spending $$$$ on painting and other cosmetic improvements, didn't want to bother.

    The underlying message: They don't seem to care, so why should I risk a complaint by asking a trespasser to leave?
    I agree with SGTUSMC8541, keep a written record. What differentiates our industry from the staffing industry, is that a contract security company is charging for a service. It may be charged on an hourly basis in most cases, but it is a service nonetheless, not just providing warm bodies. If your company is asked to take on a new contract, say to secure a parking lot at a huge plant site, and you/your company believes that a 168 won't cut it, that it should be 336 or 504, you need to advise that in writing. Either in your proposal, risk assessment, site evaluation, etc.

    If the client rejects your suggestions, then at least you have given them your professional advise. If they go with the 168, and there is a problem on the other side of the property, your general liability carrier will be forever gratefull that you can produce your recommendation. I have seen my own clients fill their proposals with statements like "we will be your loss prevention department" and never provide a single recommendation.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Wackenhut Lawson
    .......
    I wrote a formal suggestion to my supervisor and Assets protection saying ... if the load.... falls out..... It could lead to hospitalization or even death.

    I never heard any feedback.....it makes me feel like the client is thinking, "Yeah, whatever."
    One security company that I worked for put out a memo to all the sites that we would be paid x amount of money if we made a safety suggestion and the client agreed to implement it.

    I pointed out that a telephone pole on the property is leaning precariously, is not lit at night, and has already been hit once by a truck. My second suggestion was to put bollards in front of the guard shack because the access road that leads right up to the shack has a steep grade to it and vehicles (including trucks) speed right towards the guardhouse. One error in judgment or a mechanical/medical problem and the guard is "toast."

    Result: Nothing, zip, nadda, no dice, etc., etc. What a JOKE.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Not really. Training equates to action, and action equates to liability. One of the reasons off duty police officers are so attractive to private business is that most states have a blanket immunity for negligence, no duty to provide aid, and broad immunity against claims arising for lawful duties performed.

    For example. You remove patrons, by asking them to leave or having to escort them out. Down here, the insurance companies usually freak, and demand a special rider because general liability insurance will not cover "intentional acts." Your removal of someone is not covered because your use of force is intentional. Same for less lethals and firearms. Your intentionally shooting at people? Nope, not covering that unless you have a acts and omissions for use of firearms rider.

    Insurance companies love to skew the odds in their favor. If your company is not doing things that incur liability, then your not going to get claims, and they're not going to have to claim out.

    Providing first aid? That had best be a personal decision, because if its part of your duties, the company is liable as a professional rescuer.

    Another thing that the larger companies love to do is downscale their employee's duties to the point that any potential liability is minimized. This protects them against worker's compensation claims (employee acted outside of scope of duties, and is not entitled to worker's compensation for injuries derived from those activities) and general liability insurance claims (employee acted outside scope of duties, was attacked, can't sue).

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Basically, they only hire us because their insurance company requires it.
    For those of us on this forum who are here because we really want to see our profession become a profession, I think this is who we should be pestering to get on our side, the insurance industry. In business money talks. Insurance costs a lot. (My hotels have a $10,000 deductable for any case). It should be the insurance industry that sets the standards for security. Companies that hire the best trained staff that meet the highest standards would pay a lower premimum & have less of a deductable. Those that didn't want security or hired watchman types would pay the highest permimum & have the highest deducatable.

    Leave a comment:


  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Basically, they only hire us because their insurance company requires it.
    I get the feeling that we are only here because the Coast Guard requires it for Homeland Security. If the Coasties weren't always dropping by for inspections we'd probably been run off by now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Wackenhut Lawson
    .... But it makes me feel like the client is thinking, "Yeah, whatever."
    Ain't that the truth.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lawson
    replied
    Recently working at a warehouse for a large retail company, I was watching the CCTV cameras, and I noticed, every once in a while, in our truck yard, when a "Hostler" (Someone who drives a small semi-truck like cab called a "GOAT" they move trailers between the yard and the building) opens the doors to an inbound trailer, part of the load falls out because it was not properly secured. Well, a lot of our Hostlers are so non-chalant about it, they just pull the door open like a refrigerator, leaving themselves suseptable (sp?) to whatever may fall out of the back.

    I wrote a formal suggestion to my supervisor and Assets protection saying that I felt it would be in the best interest to have them walk the door open, keeping it between them and the load until they are out of harms way. This way, if the load (which commonly consists of items of 50+lbs stacked over 10ft high) falls out, it will strike the metal door and at worst, knock them over, out of the way of the load. This would be much better than a group of boxes falling directly down onto the hostler. It could lead to hospitalization or even death.

    I dont know what they did about this, I never heard any feedback, Ive only seen a couple hostlers actually start doing this, but they may have been those who do it anyway. But it makes me feel like the client is thinking, "Yeah, whatever."

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Basically, they only hire us because their insurance company requires it.

    Leave a comment:

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