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  • #46
    I have seen security companies that KNOW that a guard is sleeping and they look the other way simply because they need a body to fill the shift.
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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    • #47
      EMTGuard: That's the kind of person who will tell you that "I ain't supposed to do s--t here, and you can't make me. I'm a security guard. That other guard can do work it he wants, cause he's a wannabe cop."

      It would be hilarious to activate a fire alarm, a duress alarm, or some other type of alarm which requires her to run very fast out of the building. Ensure that there's a camera, and a supervisor, waiting outside.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #48
        You have to wonder, just where is the supervision? If supervision is aware of sleeping on the job and something bad happens, I'd recommend closing up the business. There is a difference between a body on site and one who if functioning.
        If you just want a body, think cadaver.
        Maybe the client is also asleep. The client also has some responsibility.
        Enjoy the day,
        Bill

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Bill Warnock
          ..... The client also has some responsibility.
          Enjoy the day,
          Bill
          Ideally, they do. Unfortunately, clients seem to think that security is just something that they need to meet insurance underwriting requirements. If the security company is guilty of negligence, they (security co.) have to pay for any claims out of their multi-million dollar insurance coverage.
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Mr. Security
            I have seen security companies that KNOW that a guard is sleeping and they look the other way simply because they need a body to fill the shift.
            That's a MAJOR problem. What amazes me is the attitude most of my fellow officers have regarding sleeping or anything else brought up recently at work.
            I worked more than 6 years in a Prison. I was NEVER allowed to bring in a cellphone, DVD player or am/fm stereo to listen to while on shift. I was expected to put all my attention on my duties.
            Since the banning of these things in our building I've watched SOs and plant employees go into some type of withdrawls.
            While I'm enjoying the peace and quiet of a night on shift they are fidgeting and going nuts saying they "have to have some noise". WTF?
            I've watched a plant employee working in the scale house part of our building so desparate for something to hear that they turn on an intercom next to a set of scales near a side entrance of the plant. All night she listened to the traffic outside and the traffic going by around that scale. When making rounds that evening I made sure to tap my horn on the van as I drove past the intercoms. SShe probably jumped out of her chair.
            In the same scale house they have a CB radio for talking to customer trucks who come to the plant to deliver or pick up product. For some reason the supervisor who bought it got a model which can pick up NOAA weather channels. This week one scale operator was so desparate for "some noise" he put the CB on a weather channel and we spent about 10 hours listening to the same weather forecast looped over and over every 15 minutes.
            My SO work partner has rediscovered the portable Marine Band radio we have in our guard shack. He keeps it on the desk scanning the Marine channels listening to tugs and barges out on the Mississippi River. If I've learned one thing this week it's that "tighten that line" and "keep the line tight" is about 50% of everything said when it comes to working on the river. When he's out on patrols he's rediscovered the joy of radio thanks to his bringing a fuse for the radio in the patrol car. I've learned the joys of turning the damn Marine radio off.
            On the other hand, the building where the guard shack and scale house sits has started getting cleaner. One of the SOs on day shift told me that without a radio to listen to all day they get bored and so sooner or later someone picks up a broom or mop and cleans up some. What a concept.
            I don't really understand the "need to have noise" that some people have. Hell, the main reason to work nights is for the peace and quiet.
            I asked our supervisor about reading materials and have been told that most of the problems were with employees wanting to "blast" music or listen to "adult" type programs like Chris Rock DVDs which were offending others. My type of reading material was never really an issue as long as patrols were being made and the phones/switchboard duties were being done. So I can still bring my copies of Journal of Emergency Medical Services magazine in to read or even a copy of a Dean Kootz novel.
            The problem was the SOs who brought in Fredrics of Hollywood or Victorias Secret catalogs or were flipping through Adam and Eve catalogs looking for vibrators to buy while working in the same building with the lady who spent half her shift with her nose buried in the King James Bible and listening to gospel music on the radio. About the only thing I miss is not listening to the local public safety channels on my scanner. That was my entertainment but I can live without it.
            Look, I'm sorry some people can't stay awake on shift. I am sorry some people have to have "some nioise" or they go crazy. But I LIKE it dark and quiet. In the Army I drove tanks. I liked driving because I was in my own separate compartment of the tank, by myself, instead of up in the turret with the rest of the crew. I liked working nights as a Corrections Officer and I liked working the prison dorms at night. Pass out mail, TVs off and lights out at 11pm, then sit and watch or walk up and down the isles of sleeping inmates all night. About the time the lights were coming on and the inmates were headed to the door for breakfast my shift was almost over. EASY MONEY.
            I don't need external noise to stay awake or music to keep me from being bored. I have enough internal noise thank you very much. I made peace with my demons years ago so we are cool. The voices inside are not very chatty but they keep me awake. They don't tell me to kill or burn stuff but they let me know when it's time to do laundry or wash the car so they are OK. I can listen to them when I want to and I usually have a soundtrack of my own playing in my head around the clock. When driving around town my Lady will ask what song is playing in my "head radio" at the moment and the variety will astound her since it can be anything from Rolling Stones to Uncle Cracker to Debbie Gibson. I swear the DJ voice in my mind has got to be the most diversified talent around but no radio station in the world would hire him. I guess it's a good thing I'm the only one he talks to. If anything, the gospel, pop or country music that was played in the building at work was distracting to me and I couldn't hear my own internal music or conversations.
            Oh man. Sorry about the rant. I'm sick of the BS job and am looking for another job, probably with an ambulance company closer to home. We havn't had anyone leave the Guard job in a long time. I'm the new guy and I've been at this guard shack for over 13 months. The problems lately have changed things though. Already this week I've spoken to 2 other SOs who are close to getting or have already gotten other jobs and will be leaving soon. I won't be far behind.
            Last edited by EMTGuard; 04-08-2006, 08:44 PM.
            Hospital Security Officer

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            • #51
              Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
              It would be hilarious to activate a fire alarm, a duress alarm, or some other type of alarm which requires her to run very fast out of the building. Ensure that there's a camera, and a supervisor, waiting outside.
              I seriously hope that you are kidding. Do you think the client would find that funny as well? Especially if someone was injured in the panic to escape a "false" alarm.

              Are there not laws in your state that forbid pulling a fire alarm unless for a fire situation?

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              • #52
                At my site we can test the fire alarm whenever we want. Typically if a guard is sleeping it is on graveyard where no one is in the building anyway. A perfect time for a fire alarm test. All we have to do is put our panel in test then advise the Alarm Co. and the Fire Dept that we will be testing.
                "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                "The Curve" 1998

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Big Bulldog
                  I seriously hope that you are kidding. Do you think the client would find that funny as well? Especially if someone was injured in the panic to escape a "false" alarm.

                  Are there not laws in your state that forbid pulling a fire alarm unless for a fire situation?
                  Most of the contracts I have worked require frequent and random testing of the fire alarm, with little or no notification to the workers in the building. This is to ensure that the alarm is accurately responded to.
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                  • #54
                    Admittedly you can pull a fire drill but I don't think that is what you were referring to is it really?

                    Here we have to alert the site residents a week on advance that a drill will be conducted. We don't give the date or time but we're required to give that notification.

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                    • #55
                      In my hotels the fire alarm is set up in 2 stages. At the 1st stage the alarm only rings at the front desk, Engineers office & a few other non-public areas. Only if it is not aknowledged within 3 minutes or if it is manually turned on does the alarm that the guests can hear begin to ring, The proplem has been that every time the general alarm has gone off (only twice in about 20 years) guests have got hurt. (Twisted ankles etc). Hotels are not like office buildings where you can have drills.

                      Another problem in a hotel is evacuation. Montreal law says that there has to be an organized team made up of employees to evacuate large buildings. This works in an office building. In an hotel it doesn't. In the day time we have a Maid on every floor, 4 or 5 Maintenance people etc. But NO GUSETS! Guests are out sightseeing or attending business meetings in the day. At night when we could have 2000 people in the building we have at the most 5 staff on duty!

                      We do have fire drills involving the front desk staff that aknowledge the alarm at the pannel & with the "fire brigade" made up of Security & Maintenance.
                      I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                      Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                      • #56
                        If I may throw my 2 cents in. I do not tolerate sleepers on posts as virtually all of ours are a bit dangerous in location. However, if the person is slamming OT and extra shifts due to lack of pay I can understand, especially if he is the sole breadwinner of the family. This industry is sad in pay and benefit coverage in general.

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