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NYPD vs NYSD

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  • SGTJosh
    replied
    you wouldnt happen to be this company http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wtBj5RzUeg

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  • ValleyOne
    replied
    I am in awe... the term Super Ninja doesn't seem to do it justice.
    Last edited by ValleyOne; 11-04-2007, 06:21 AM.

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  • Michael Ledgerwood
    replied
    Seems to me that there is something fishy going on here. 1st Surveillence is supposed to be discreet. So marking a Surveillence vehicle defeats the purpose. 2nd Me thinks that this is a bunch of wannabes who don't grasp the concept of private security. Kinda reminds me of that story a few months ago about the New York man who got arrested for impersonating a cop and they found he had a whole "precient" set up in his house.

    I go a serious problem with someone coming on to this website asking for advice and then ignorning the advice given. Sounds to me like dude might be trying to drum up some business for his illegal company. The cop in me says that the NYPD (the real boys in blue who don't need phony titles) are right when they get mad at you. Keep up this behavior and you will get to ride in a genuine, bonafide NYPD radio car down to Central Booking. Sounds like a tool to me .

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  • davis002
    replied
    Originally posted by N-TWEEZY View Post
    just because you didn't hear of it doesn't mean that it doesn't exist!!!!! you think running a business that's falling apart is easy?! HUH?
    Again, we can't slander a company that doesn't exist...

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by N-TWEEZY View Post
    just because you didn't hear of it doesn't mean that it doesn't exist!!!!! you think running a business that's falling apart is easy?! HUH?
    Right.

    Secretary of State of New York says there's only one NYCD, Inc. You can visit its website at nycd.com, and see how these Constables protect New York every day by making copies of CDs.

    Either that, or Mr. Valentino doesn't realize that calling yourself a corporation without actually registering one is a good way to get beaten down by the IRS and state tax offices.

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    I am just curious how you can get away with using the terms Constable, etc without being caught up with LE duties or some confusion. I was a Consulate Constable for a consulate for 3 days and yes I had to carry my passport with me and was sworn in as a LE for that massive (ok it was tiny office floor) area but out on the street I was just me ............ the badge did not get me a free lunch or coffee.

    Police in Australia are very very strict on people using military or police ranks which MAY confuse the general public and I recall 1 clown who ran his security company like he was in the army. My client asked me to audit their records of their performance and I had heard in the industry that they were referred to as AGENTS and had ranks of COLONEL, MAJOR and the like.

    Finding the office, I asked to see JOHN SMITH as Corporal Meathead replies "Colonel Smith is expecting you". Did he just say Col. Smith or Col. Sanders I thought to myself ? The Cpl had to salute this Smith loser which made me smile at such a pathetic and illegal operation. They also had the police visit over complaints of this rank crap ........... when the public speaks up about impersonating a police or miltary officer - our police jump on it.

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  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Originally posted by N-TWEEZY View Post
    you think running a business that's falling apart is easy?! HUH?

    Too funny.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by davis002 View Post
    We can't slander a company that doesn't actually exist...
    just because you didn't hear of it doesn't mean that it doesn't exist!!!!! you think running a business that's falling apart is easy?! HUH?

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  • davis002
    replied
    Originally posted by N-TWEEZY View Post
    I am not a felon, I have a clean record thank you very much! You do have a point about the title of the ranks, there's a lot of changes that need to be made, but slandering my name and company is not something I look forward to.
    We can't slander a company that doesn't actually exist...

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I am not a felon, I have a clean record thank you very much! You do have a point about the title of the ranks, there's a lot of changes that need to be made, but slandering my name and company is not something I look forward to.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Considering that a Constable, under New York Statute, is a NYS Certified Peace Officer who serves at the leave of a town or village...

    Mr. Valentino is most likely a felon under NYS law, in addition to having a very strange spelling of "Commander in Chief" for a title.

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  • Arff312
    replied
    Originally posted by N-TWEEZY View Post
    The word ''constable'' dates back to old english times. For example, ''lord high constable'' in old english times originally meant a high person of power if I'm not mistaken. We at NYCD, Inc. use the term constable for the high ranking officials. 1st. Commander N Chief Constable Valentino(myself), 2nd. Commander N Chief Constable Collins. There's also Assistants too, one of wich is Assistant Commander N Chief Constable Jon Butter.
    Actually this is direct from dictionary.com
    con·sta·ble /ˈkɒnstəbəl or, especially Brit., ˈkʌn-/
    Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[kon-stuh-buhl or, especially Brit., kuhn-] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
    –noun 1. an officer of the peace, having police and minor judicial functions, usually in a small town, rural district, etc.
    2. Chiefly British. a police officer.
    3. an officer of high rank in medieval monarchies, usually the commander of all armed forces, esp. in the absence of the ruler.
    4. the keeper or governor of a royal fortress or castle.

    So unless you are a Police officer ( chiefly british) , A high ranking officer in medieval monarchies or the keeper of a royal fortress, I think that the term is being used wrong. Also the definition would lead one to believe that there is no need for the commander n chief in front of the world due to the meaning of the word.\

    There is also another meanign for constable as found in the many entries on dictionary.com
    WordNet - Cite This Source - Share This constable

    noun
    1. a lawman with less authority and jurisdiction than a sheriff
    2. English landscape painter (1776-1837)
    3. a police officer of the lowest rank

    So unless you are a lawman, English painter or Police officer I think that the term is being used wrong here.
    Last edited by Arff312; 11-02-2007, 11:33 PM.

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  • Arff312
    replied
    Wow the way you word your titles sounds liek u want to be the President and police officers. Seems to me as an outsider looking in that the title is too long and can be confusing to the general public. Wouldn't chief constable or commmander constable be easier ? Plus it probably takes up most of the business card to write the title. This is not to heckle you. But if a security officer or guard introduced him self to me as commander n chief constable so and so when I am working with the sheriffs dcepartment I would be hard pressed not to laugh and walk away or even to take the guy seriously. That may be were some of the problems with the local police are coming from.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Arff312 View Post
    Sounds like you want to be a law enforement ageny. Or at least confused as one. The term constable usually refers to a law enforcement officer or person employed by the courts to do certain things. The name NYSD can also be easily confused as a law enforcement agency. You should not be mad at NYPD but your self. Change the name, change ur officers names and thatll help. Other then that time heals all wounds./ Remember you are in a city that doesnt like security officers to do much. I know this because my dad is a cop in NYC and he was shocked to hear that in AZ we can arrest and carry weapons, drive marked county cars etc.... So you will always have a hard time there.
    The word ''constable'' dates back to old english times. For example, ''lord high constable'' in old english times originally meant a high person of power if I'm not mistaken. We at NYCD, Inc. use the term constable for the high ranking officials. 1st. Commander N Chief Constable Valentino(myself), 2nd. Commander N Chief Constable Collins. There's also Assistants too, one of wich is Assistant Commander N Chief Constable Jon Butter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    People are les likely to commit a crime in the presence of a uniformed officer or a marked vehicle. Only 15 percent of the surveillance units are marked.

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