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image is it everything ?

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  • Chucky
    replied
    Interesting it was just Sundays NFL banter when the commentators were discussing how Brett Farve was about to overtake Dan Marinos record and how Dan felt about it. Dan stated something like, They (the fans) may not remember how I may have achieved this plato but will never forget how good I dressed.

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  • BadBoynMD
    replied
    You could sport a neatly-trimmed moustache if you wanted to, but no one did...except for a few of the female officers.

    ...that was a joke, son...ah say, a joke.
    OMG....SPEW ALERT please next time.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    When I was in LE, we had our uniforms tailored, including a sewn-in front crease in the slacks and "darts" (I think they were called) taken in the shirts. This was before the advent of the cheap cotton/polyester BDU uniform that (to me) looks like you've slept in it the minute you put it on.

    Oh, and we didn't wear "sneaker" style shoes, either. Shoes/boots (most wore jodphur or a western style) had to shine, as did our duty belt and brass. Shift roll calls included inspections down to sidearms. Even sideburns were regulated, and no beards. You could sport a neatly-trimmed moustache if you wanted to, but no one did...except for a few of the female officers.

    ...that was a joke, son...ah say, a joke.

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  • Eric
    replied
    Your points should be a lesson to many.
    This summer I was at an event that had both Security and Police Officer's. The Police uniforms were well fitting and pressed, the Security staff though were at the other end of the scale. They did the jobs well but the uniforms made them look sloppy and affected respect levels (mine anyway). When I was in uniform a few years back we had a tailor one day a week to help with the look, not all are as fortunate but some professional help could be worth the money.

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  • JSam21
    replied
    Remember this also...

    The uniform also instils confidence into your officers. If you make them look like "guards" they will act like guards. If you dress them up and make them look professional they will more than likely act professional.

    At my hospital the admin. is changing our uniform. We are going from the hard police style uniform to something that looks like you would wear it to church. We are going to a baby blue "satine", aka shiny-ish, dress shirt with no badge and navy pants. We will still wear our duty gear but its going to look really really bad and remove any fear from the gangbangers in the area that they are going to get arrested.

    I have a feeling that this uniform change is going to lead to more use of force incidents at the hospital because we will be getting pushed more by subjects. It's going to take an incident to get them to even reconsider the change. VA Tech almost put a stop to the uniform change.

    **End Rant**

    p.s.

    I always had a saying when I played sports. "If you look good, you will play good." Its true...at least for me.

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  • hrdickinson
    replied
    Well said, Nathan!

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  • hrdickinson
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    Appearance is certainly important. Beyond uniforms, an officer's bearing, posture, demeanor, fitness and deportment are also part of the appearance factor. You can stuff a pig into a tuxedo, but to Jimmy Dean he's still just a couple hundred pounds of breakfast links.
    My Ex had a similar saying: "You can put a saddle on a pig, but it doesn't make it a race horse".

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    I said it on Officer.com, I'll say it here...

    1. You do not need to look like the local police to do your job. In fact, if you do your job properly and the client wants actual protection, your different looking uniform and patches will be feared more than the police.

    For residential clients, the tenants who are your problems and their friends can learn a very important lesson: The police can only arrest you. Security can have you evicted.

    Police usually don't become involved in civil matters. Which is why you're there. Your clients should be hiring you to protect their interests.

    This includes the protection of residents from physical harm (includes life safety threats like fires and stuff), provide a point of contact for the management company after hours, enforce the covenant of documents and lease (a civil matter between the tenant and the landlord), and enforce the laws of the state of blah as they relate to the protection of client and tenant life and property.

    If a client doesn't want to back the security firm up, instead doing nothing on reports and incidents presented to them, then the security firm needs to delegate less resources or simply find them in material breach and break the contract.

    If a client demands to know why the property "isn't cleaned up" yet the tenants who are repeat and chronic offenders are not given notices to cure or evicted, then it should be made plain: You are part of the problem, and unless you change your business operations, you will always be at 60% occupancy with multiple lease breakers who can't stand to live in filth and violence anymore.

    A security firm does not need to emulate the local police force to get results. The bad people should learn to fear and respect the security officers assigned to that property. They should learn that if they commit violations of law, they are going to be arrested and barred from the property and they'll continue to be every time they come back. The trouble tenants should learn and fear that their illegal activities will result in their eviction for cause. The guys dealing drugs across the street should learn that they will be arrested each and every time they deal drugs on the property. They will be arrested when they get more drugs from the tenant who is their source. They will be denied entrance to the property.

    We do not need a veil of police authority to conduct operations and put true fear into the criminal element. Even in Florida, where you can't do anything remotely like most states can do, companies have cleaned up drug dens and created exclusion zones as wide as 3 blocks from their client for drugs and bangers.

    A yellow shirt with security on it may get the guys who come up and screw with your guards, but then their guards do their jobs. Everyone gets ID out. Everyone gets run. Contact cards get filled out. They have no legitimate purpose on the property, since they're sole purpose at that time is to harass the guard, so they're issued trespass warnings or arrested for trespassing.

    Simply do not let the idiots dominate the situation. Use the powers invested in citizens, or in some states security personnel, to continue to control the threat to good order and safety on your property. And they are a threat to good order and safety. Terminate it.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Appearance is certainly important. Beyond uniforms, an officer's bearing, posture, demeanor, fitness and deportment are also part of the appearance factor. You can stuff a pig into a tuxedo, but to Jimmy Dean he's still just a couple hundred pounds of breakfast links.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 09-23-2007, 12:32 AM.

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  • Chucky
    replied
    I fully agree that looks are very important. When I took this job I was giving the choice of BDUs or regular officer uniform. I went with the later. The only difference is from the local police instead of Black on Black I chose a navy blue shirt with black pants. From 30 feet away you would swear I was a local cop. I made sure to order bright gold piping around my shoulder patch. A lot of local cops are using nylon gun belts and utility packs to hold their gear. Spray, Cuffs, Mags etc.

    I am told that the older leather gear made things uncomfortable especially when in the cruiser for long periods of time. So we ware nylon gun belts. When 8 out of 10 people that you encounter ask what dept you are with then you must look like a cop. All that being said the more you look like a cop the less likely bad guys will attempt to mess with you. And your client will be impressed also. Whereas a bright blue shirt screams of security in this area and may be a come screw with me sign from a distance.

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  • Badge714
    replied
    We have one client who did say that we looked a lot better than the previous company, and it did affect her decision to hire us. She said the Securitas "uniforms" were the ugliest she had ever seen!
    Last edited by Badge714; 09-22-2007, 10:01 AM.

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  • UtahProtectionForce
    started a topic image is it everything ?

    image is it everything ?

    I know image is a big part of client retention, and aquiring new clients but should that be the soul basis of why a client chooses on service over the other ? after much thought i will be going black over black, with the uniforms, with my current patch with a few minor adjustments, but is image truely everything have you had clients pick your service because your outward image was better looking then other services ?

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