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Urbania Police to Liquor Store: Hire Armed Security or Else

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  • Urbania Police to Liquor Store: Hire Armed Security or Else

    Story: http://www.securityinfowatch.com/art...on=379&id=6743
    From Lexis-Nexis via SecurityInfoWatch.com
    URBANA -- The owners of the Home Run Food Mart, 1509 Washington St., have sued Urbana, seeking to overturn a city demand that the business must hire an armed, licensed security guard or face the loss of its package liquor license.

    I have seen "public nusance" issues like this before. Companies generate so many calls for police service that the city feels they are an undue strain on police resources, and require steps be taken in good faith to control the criminal element on their property.

    These usually translate, from my personal perspective, into a demand to hire off-duty police officers. Most companies, being faced with a Code hearing declaring them a public nusance if they don't hire the off-duty police officers at 40-60 dollars per hour, run to a licensed private security company for protection. The hiring of private security officers on the property is evident of the good faith attempt to control the property.

    But, in this case, we have the city demanding that the owners of the store purchase the services of an armed security officer. Note that the Chief of Police, who drafted a Security Plan for the store at city expense, and the council requires its implementation, stated one, armed, licensed security guard.

    How many companies would feel comfortable taking on that contract, with the added overhead of a pre-determined security plan from the police department as part of any post orders negotiated with the client? Especially when the client does not wish the services demanded by the police?
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

  • #2
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Story: http://www.securityinfowatch.com/art...on=379&id=6743
    From Lexis-Nexis via SecurityInfoWatch.com
    URBANA -- The owners of the Home Run Food Mart, 1509 Washington St., have sued Urbana, seeking to overturn a city demand that the business must hire an armed, licensed security guard or face the loss of its package liquor license.

    I have seen "public nusance" issues like this before. Companies generate so many calls for police service that the city feels they are an undue strain on police resources, and require steps be taken in good faith to control the criminal element on their property.

    These usually translate, from my personal perspective, into a demand to hire off-duty police officers. Most companies, being faced with a Code hearing declaring them a public nusance if they don't hire the off-duty police officers at 40-60 dollars per hour, run to a licensed private security company for protection. The hiring of private security officers on the property is evident of the good faith attempt to control the property.

    But, in this case, we have the city demanding that the owners of the store purchase the services of an armed security officer. Note that the Chief of Police, who drafted a Security Plan for the store at city expense, and the council requires its implementation, stated one, armed, licensed security guard.

    How many companies would feel comfortable taking on that contract, with the added overhead of a pre-determined security plan from the police department as part of any post orders negotiated with the client? Especially when the client does not wish the services demanded by the police?

    It would be interesting to see which type of police calls comprise the bulk of the calls. Since an armed guard is what the city wants, one gets the impression that the calls are of a serious nature and not just nuisance calls. Otherwise, why couldn't an unarmed, less expensive guard, equipped with a baton, cuffs, OC spray, etc. handle most of the problems?

    If most of the calls are serious and the business pays its taxes, then it would seem that the city is obligated to provide the same police protection it offers to any other business there. I hope the city loses on the armed part of their demand.
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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    • #3
      Remember, this is Illinois. It may be that the only licensing that you have in Illinois at the state level is for armed guards. The carrying of OC and other devices may be illegal, as well. Illinois also has a statute giving any citizen full arrest powers when arresting for a crime in their presence - same as a LEO.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
        Remember, this is Illinois. It may be that the only licensing that you have in Illinois at the state level is for armed guards. The carrying of OC and other devices may be illegal, as well. Illinois also has a statute giving any citizen full arrest powers when arresting for a crime in their presence - same as a LEO.
        Sounds complicated. It just seems strange that this business is the only liquor store in town with all the problems. Maybe their police calls are unfounded???
        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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        • #5
          The phones calls are most likely legitimate. The Urbana they speak of is none other than the home of UIUC (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Or just Univerisity of Illinois of your lazy ). Which presents a rather LARGE customer base for this particular store to deal with.

          Off the top of my head, I believe UofI is in a town that allows 19+ to get into bars (21+ to drink, of course). But I would imagine that the bulk of the complaint calls are for those who are under 21.

          I'll have to ask my brother, he's a senior at that school and bartends at a bar down there

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Will
            The phones calls are most likely legitimate. The Urbana they speak of is none other than the home of UIUC (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Or just Univerisity of Illinois of your lazy ). Which presents a rather LARGE customer base for this particular store to deal with.

            Off the top of my head, I believe UofI is in a town that allows 19+ to get into bars (21+ to drink, of course). But I would imagine that the bulk of the complaint calls are for those who are under 21.

            I'll have to ask my brother, he's a senior at that school and bartends at a bar down there
            Great. Let us know. If the majority of calls are for underage drinking, it would seem that unarmed security is all that is necessary to curb this problem. (Assuming that IL allows unarmed security. See prior post by N. A. Corbier)
            Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

            Comment


            • #7
              If the calls are for underaged drinking, and there is a propensity for violence by the teenagers, then there's still a need for armed security. Remember, that officer will be out there alone, most likely without support from the store owners who are fighting not to pay the company the officer works for, and will have arrest authority under IL Statute, which the city's proposal may require enforcement of laws.
              Some Kind of Commando Leader

              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                If the calls are for underaged drinking, and there is a propensity for violence by the teenagers, then there's still a need for armed security. Remember, that officer will be out there alone, most likely without support from the store owners who are fighting not to pay the company the officer works for, and will have arrest authority under IL Statute, which the city's proposal may require enforcement of laws.
                How about a couple of bouncers?
                Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                Comment


                • #9
                  clarification

                  I know this is an old thread but I felt it would be a good place to begin posting, as I work primarily in Urbana. First there are two levels of security license in Illinois. First is the unarmed Security officer license or PERC (permanent employee registration card). This authorizes a person to work as an employee of a licensed security contractor, locksmith, alarm technician or private investigator. It requires only that you have a clean criminal history, and a high school diploma or G.E.D. and are 18 yr.s old and legally allowed to work in the United States. You must also pass a state certified 20 hr (I know, I know) training program. The second level is the FAC (fire-arms authorization card). Which requires you to be 21 yr.s old, and possess a valid FOID (fire-arm owners identification card {Illinois answer to background checks, before Brady was passed} possess a valid PERC, take an additionally 40hrs of training and pass the same weapons qualification exams as the ISP. In Illinois you may only affect a citizen’s arrest if you personally witness and felony in progress, and my only use force to do so if it is of a violent nature. (I.e. if they are not physically attacking any one you can only "arrest them" by going Gomer Pile "Citizen’s arrest! Citizen’s arrest! Citizen’s arrest!")
                  As for the nature of the calls; the majority were from shots fired/robberies. Home Run is no where near UIUC's campus and is in fact in the worst part of Urbana. An area bad enough that they built and annex to the county jail there, and where I got my start working in central Illinois. The problem was caused by the use of Home Run's parking lot being used for dealing drugs, and the presence of security had done little to correct this as they are not there 24/7.
                  "A good deed’s like pissing yourself in dark pants. Warm feeling but no one notices." - Jacob Taylor

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