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  • Serpico
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Florida's a weird place. In Tampa / St. Petersburg, if you have a full C license, the police will leave you alone the moment you identify yourself. They know that your doing a job, that your agency can sue the police department for jeapordising the investigation, and a whole bunch of other nastiness + professional courtsey = Oh, have a nice day.
    I was in Miami Beach for almost a week and never had a problem down there. I had a uniformed SWAT officer pull up and check me out but he was cool about everything and went on his way. Hell, he even apologized for breaking my cover. But, for some reason, the day I got into with the K9, dispatch didn't notify the cops in that district and I was parked near a school. Didn't help that an out of town idiot decided to shoot one of their officers a few days prior to the incident.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Serpico
    Thanks for the info. In regard to 800 hours of experience, I've got 2000 hours of field surveillance and about 1500 worth of retail LP investigations. I'd be able to pass theit 2 year intership if I get that fine debacle squared away?

    To be honest, I'd be happy if I never had to enter Florida again. After doing cases in Little Havana and Little Haiti and getting physically threatened by a K9 OFC in Miami Beach, I think staying away from Florida might be a good idea.
    Florida's a weird place. In Tampa / St. Petersburg, if you have a full C license, the police will leave you alone the moment you identify yourself. They know that your doing a job, that your agency can sue the police department for jeapordising the investigation, and a whole bunch of other nastiness + professional courtsey = Oh, have a nice day.

    Leave a comment:


  • Serpico
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    You won't be able to operate a PI company in Florida without 2 years of internship in a Florida PI firm as an intern (CC license), unless you meet their requirements for 800 hours of experience as an investigator.

    If you were fined by the Division, you should contact the Division and ask them when you'll be granted a CC permit, or if your disqualified.

    You have "extenuating circumstances," as an individual, but the company you worked for does not.
    Thanks for the info. In regard to 800 hours of experience, I've got 2000 hours of field surveillance and about 1500 worth of retail LP investigations. I'd be able to pass theit 2 year intership if I get that fine debacle squared away?

    To be honest, I'd be happy if I never had to enter Florida again. After doing cases in Little Havana and Little Haiti and getting physically threatened by a K9 OFC in Miami Beach, I think staying away from Florida might be a good idea.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Serpico
    I've got a question about Florida licensing. A year ago I was working as a field investigator doing insurance claims investigations for a company out of Illinois. They sent me to Florida 3 times in 2 weeks. I ended up getting a $300 fine ($100 for each case) because although my company was licensed to operate in Florida, I wasn't. My company never told me about the fact I needed to be licensed and I had already moved on to another job before I was fined. I tried to fight it, but the State wasn't exactly sympathetic to my plea. Question is, will this bar me from getting licensed to operate a PI company in FL?
    You won't be able to operate a PI company in Florida without 2 years of internship in a Florida PI firm as an intern (CC license), unless you meet their requirements for 800 hours of experience as an investigator.

    If you were fined by the Division, you should contact the Division and ask them when you'll be granted a CC permit, or if your disqualified.

    You have "extenuating circumstances," as an individual, but the company you worked for does not.

    Leave a comment:


  • Serpico
    replied
    I've got a question about Florida licensing. A year ago I was working as a field investigator doing insurance claims investigations for a company out of Illinois. They sent me to Florida 3 times in 2 weeks. I ended up getting a $300 fine ($100 for each case) because although my company was licensed to operate in Florida, I wasn't. My company never told me about the fact I needed to be licensed and I had already moved on to another job before I was fined. I tried to fight it, but the State wasn't exactly sympathetic to my plea. Question is, will this bar me from getting licensed to operate a PI company in FL?

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    The only reason they regulate us is because we look like police, and people think we're in a position of trust. Till 1997, Wisconsin didn't even regulate security guards. Armed or unarmed. Since it was the right of every citizen to strap on a gun - why regulate it?

    Its definately a money racket - like any other license is. But, then, look at most of the laws. If you work for the US Government, you don't need state licensing - your not working on the state's property. If your a police officer, you don't need regulating because your accountable to your city/county/state through the department.

    That's the whole thing. The industry as a whole has made very little attempt to be accountable to anything but the allmighty dollar, so the states stepped in. You see this in the IT industry with Sarbane-Oxley, which is designed to maintain data security and accountability to prevent another Enron. When private industry screws up, the states will go, "Fine, we'll tell you exactly how and when you can play."

    Take a look at the materials your given by the state when licensed. They tell you how and what not to do. They attempt to regulate under penalty of disqualification. "Do this or don't work in this industry anymore."

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  • Echos13
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    State: How can we protect the public from security companies and security workers? I know, lets license them. We can make them undergo a background check. Optionally, give them some training so that they know what the job is, and the insurance companies like that. Write rules against things we see them doing that the public dosen't like - so we can take their license away. Make them have insurance for when they screw up, or someone thinks they have.

    I'd say that's about how states come up with security licensing.
    Indeed. I am not exactly a big on the state's laws and measures myself at times. But perhaps some kind of standard can be set by private sector nation wide? Not sure how that can be done when you have the state's nose (or fed's) sticking into it one way or another. Is it regualting. Naw. I think it's another way for states to get money out of the private worker. LEO's go to school and get a piece of paper that says they can work. We go to school and get a peice of paper that says after you buy a license you can work. But work with this and not work with that. Yea. State.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Echos13
    Seems like states vary a bit on requirements and making the costs vary as well. Interesting, I wonder "who" these people are that sit down and say; OK, this is what it costs to be a security officer and this is what it will cost to get a company license. To bad they all can't adapt to a standard like the CJSTC. If all states could do the same thing in security maybe that would help make the field more dynamic and stable. Maybe even make all the costs relatively the same all around. I know, that's really dreaming there.
    State: How can we protect the public from security companies and security workers? I know, lets license them. We can make them undergo a background check. Optionally, give them some training so that they know what the job is, and the insurance companies like that. Write rules against things we see them doing that the public dosen't like - so we can take their license away. Make them have insurance for when they screw up, or someone thinks they have.

    I'd say that's about how states come up with security licensing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Echos13
    replied
    Seems like states vary a bit on requirements and making the costs vary as well. Interesting, I wonder "who" these people are that sit down and say; OK, this is what it costs to be a security officer and this is what it will cost to get a company license. To bad they all can't adapt to a standard like the CJSTC. If all states could do the same thing in security maybe that would help make the field more dynamic and stable. Maybe even make all the costs relatively the same all around. I know, that's really dreaming there.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    I have the licensing requirements for WI PI Company (THere is no security company in WI, only PI companies) on the other computer. Basically, its 30,000 general liability, and about 250. However, add in an additional 150 because you must have a licensed PI running the security and PI operations.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Bridgegate
    Not sure on the corporate license cost in Washington, but in Oregon it's around $400 last I knew... JUST for the security license, not including insurance & all that stuff...
    License to run a company:

    -You must be at least 21 years old;
    -be a citizen or resident alien;
    -have no criminal convictions that directly relate to your capacity to perform the duties of a private security guard and/or hinders public safety;
    -possess three years compensated work experience as a supervisor, manager or administrator in a security guard business or related field;
    -or pass an examination. If applying on the basis of exam, the exam will be scheduled within three weeks of receipt of a paid application.
    -Prior to issuing the license, you must provide a certificate of insurance ($25,000 bodily injury and $25,000 property damage). The non-refundable application fee is $250.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charger
    replied
    About the same here in the PNW... Oregon and Washington are both around $90 ~ $100 with the fingerprinting & whatnot included.... then $50 to renew each year....

    In Oregon you can get the license on your own, but Washington requires a company sponsorship like N.A. Corbier mentioned...

    Not sure on the corporate license cost in Washington, but in Oregon it's around $400 last I knew... JUST for the security license, not including insurance & all that stuff...

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Echos13
    I just got a notice that the fees will be going up next year here in Florida for new and renewing services. Man, they are sticking it to us here in Florida. Gas, property tax, car/home insurance, phone, electric and now this. They have jumped around 15 to 20 dollars on some licenses. Anyone else got an increase? I am not sure what costs are in other states. But I think for the most part Florida has (aside from the liability and comp insurance) the lowest fees for various security occupations and titles. But still. Ouch!
    Have you beat. 53 for Wisconsin Private Security Person Permit, plus 20 BG/FBI Prints, 6 WICIB Background, 10 for the temp. Temp is not required to work.

    BUT, only a security company may request a permit. You must be hired and sponsored before you can get a permit to work in security in WI.

    There is no training requirement.

    FL's fee increase are statewide, all occupations under 493.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Where I live it's 1,800 for 2 years and 800 every renewal for a corporate security license.

    Leave a comment:


  • Echos13
    started a topic Fees for licensing

    Fees for licensing

    I just got a notice that the fees will be going up next year here in Florida for new and renewing services. Man, they are sticking it to us here in Florida. Gas, property tax, car/home insurance, phone, electric and now this. They have jumped around 15 to 20 dollars on some licenses. Anyone else got an increase? I am not sure what costs are in other states. But I think for the most part Florida has (aside from the liability and comp insurance) the lowest fees for various security occupations and titles. But still. Ouch!

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