Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What Are The Minimum Requirement To Get Hired By Your Employer?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What Are The Minimum Requirement To Get Hired By Your Employer?

    http://forums.securityinfowatch.com/...or-Emergencies

    The above referenced thread made me wonder, what are the minimum requirement to get hired by your employer? And, perhaps more importantly, does your employer hire people that just meet the minimum or do they typically hire folks that have qualification well beyond the minimum? Also, what sort of turn over do you have? Do you have folks there for 10, 20, 30 years or is a seasoned veteran at your place have a mere year or two on?

  • #2
    Minimum requirements is 18 years of age and no felony convictions. Thats for uniform positions, detective positions they want past LP experience as well as the above. All of us (detectives) have experience, theres more than a few entry level in the uniform positions. As for turnover, out of almost 20 employees im #5 with seniority at 9 months.
    Sergeant Phil Esterhaus: "Hey, let's be careful out there.."

    THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Jim1348 View Post
      http://forums.securityinfowatch.com/...or-Emergencies

      The above referenced thread made me wonder, what are the minimum requirement to get hired by your employer? And, perhaps more importantly, does your employer hire people that just meet the minimum or do they typically hire folks that have qualification well beyond the minimum? Also, what sort of turn over do you have? Do you have folks there for 10, 20, 30 years or is a seasoned veteran at your place have a mere year or two on?
      Went in, got hired and went to work that same night. Management were all there 5+ years but for everybody else I worked with they were there a year or less . The minimal requirements were that you needed to be 18 or older and have a diploma or GED . The company I was applying for asked can you stand for 6 or more hours and lift more then 50 lbs continuously . I replied are we moving the companies we are securing and everybody laughed then I was hired. I was given a uniform. The shirt was 3 sizes too big and the pants were 4 inches too short .
      Confronted with the choice, the American people would choose the policeman's truncheon over the anarchist's bomb.
      Spiro Agnew

      Why yes I am a glorified babysitter , I am here to politely ask you to follow the rules , if not daddy comes to spank you and put you in time out its your choice - Me

      Luck is a red hair woman , if you ever dated one you know there remarkably dangerous , my personal preference is to be competent and let luck join the ride if she so chooses .- Clint Smith

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Jim1348 View Post
        Do you have folks there for 10, 20, 30 years or is a seasoned veteran at your place have a mere year or two on?
        We have a high turn-over rate in this sector throughout the country, mostly because a lot of people just work before their conscript service or during their studies before moving along to their "actual" career. I remember seeing a statistic once that the average career of a security officer lasts two or so years around here.

        The legal requirements in a nutshell:Pass a 40h course to gain a temporary license permitting work for four months each year, then a 60h course for the actual five-year license. In accounts where you work as a "crowd controller" (mostly malls, hospitals and public transit), which is a distinct legal status, you'll also need the 32h course for a crowd controller license. You'll more or less pass all of the above if you have a clean criminal record, can read and write and have functional hands and feet. The written and practical exams are ridiculously easy.

        When I was recruited to my first company I was twenty with no prior security experience or licensing. It's still more or less the same in case of bigger companies, they're all so short on staff that more or less anyone can get in and the company will pay for their training, at least for entry-level tasks. I have experience in two security companies and know people in each company of the "Big Four" (Securitas, G4S, ISS and a certain locally owned firm) and this is almost universal in the capital region.

        Companies might have stricter criteria for more demanding accounts, such as mall security and transit. My current employer requires a year of experience in crowd controller accounts for our remaining malls, and another company I worked for had a requirement of two years experience for the mall account I worked at. The company handling the Helsinki commuter train system requires a minimum of two years in that account, to provide another example.

        Comment


        • #5
          You just have to be breathing.

          As for most, security license, valid drivers license, drug free, and complete pre assignment training.

          At my site we have several with more than 20 years. Our turn over rate seems to be low and I attribute that to our security director/client who looks out for his people.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Security_K9_Guy View Post
            You just have to be breathing.

            As for most, security license, valid drivers license, drug free, and complete pre assignment training.

            At my site we have several with more than 20 years. Our turn over rate seems to be low and I attribute that to our security director/client who looks out for his people.
            Drug test what is that ? I have never been pissed for security except for when I had to use some of the higher levels of the force continuum. All they found was my ADD medication and still I was fired until I got an attorney pro-Bono from the ADA to get hired back. Should of gotten a pay day and run the hell away but it is what it is.
            Confronted with the choice, the American people would choose the policeman's truncheon over the anarchist's bomb.
            Spiro Agnew

            Why yes I am a glorified babysitter , I am here to politely ask you to follow the rules , if not daddy comes to spank you and put you in time out its your choice - Me

            Luck is a red hair woman , if you ever dated one you know there remarkably dangerous , my personal preference is to be competent and let luck join the ride if she so chooses .- Clint Smith

            Comment


            • #7
              They do a mouth swab and send it to a lab.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yep. My company also.

                Comment


                • #9
                  As Polar wrote earlier on, the private security business around here favors the youngest recruits but in exchange the turnover rates are high because alot of people never consider this job as something to make a career out of.. I can't really blame them, since first of all your career advancement is going to be an uphill battle no matter how much you study the security field and pass the various examinations available for the private sector. Also one shouldn't go to work for the biggest companies, since there's going to be so much competition for the better paid positions and you really won't stand out from the crowds of people all competing for the better positions like locusts.

                  The various companies also recruit all sorts of folks, it seems. You just have to have the necessary license to work as an officer and employment is pretty much guaranteed. Perhaps the more demanding accounts might be a different story.

                  When I started about four years ago I had dropped out of the university and I had my year-long conscription in the defence forces done some years before. I paid for the necessary courses myself along with the additional use-of-force courses and after a hassle I started work for my current employer. The times were much better then, since the higher-ups actually had time to handle all the little tasks and shift planning wasn't total chaos like it is nowadays.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    For my company, our frontline security officers require a provincial security license, must have a minimum of 5 years of full-time experience in the security industry or equivalent, must currently hold handcuff certification, and must have 3 solid references. Once hired, they must successfully pass any testing that is required for a particular account.

                    We are very serious about those minimum requirements - we do compensate accordingly (well above industry average), but if you fail to meet one or more, your application will not be considered. We have actually turned down new clients because we have not been able to hire the appropriate amount of new staff, but we won't relent on the minimum requirements.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Minimum qualifications for warm body accounts is 18 ged/diploma, pulse, and no record. However they allow each director to set their own minimum for accepting candidates sent by corporate so sometimes it works out. At my site the majority of us have college degrees or are working towards them, lots of prior experience, at least 25 years old. Boss is doing his best to snag all the veterans who come through the pipeline. Our turnover is semi high I started a year ago and 6 people have left, however 4 of them finally got their academy classes one got enough college credits to join the Marines with a ged and the last moved out of state to care for an aging relative.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Company: 18+, DL, Ministry-Approved Security Guard Training Course (can be obtained through company if need be), Guard Card, Standard First Aid (SG course states minimum Emergency First Aid) Clean Record.

                        Client: Advanced/Industrial First Aid, NORCAT, TDG, AED, Fitness Test, Clean Piss Test.

                        Some of us also have additional certs sought out independently.
                        World's Youngest Grumpy Old Man

                        AF&AM

                        Opinions expressed in my posts are mine alone and do not reflect those of my employer, the client, or SIW Forums (unless specifically stated for moderation purposes)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          21 years of age, some experience preferred. Clean record. 40 hours of training; we meet the state's requirements for contract guards, the rest is training on how to do things our way. (We're in house.)

                          Sadly, our retention rate has gone down, due to several factors. Night guards used to stay 2-3 years; day, swing and lead officers used to be 3-5 years. With the improving economy if we can get a night guard for 6 mos. to a year we're doing well.

                          Some of the factors include not a lot of room to move up and a push to go to P/T officers. It is a high stress site, with a lot of verbal abuse from the tenants.

                          Part timers are great from management's view because they cost less; in my view, you're getting an officer who isn't here enough of the time to get to know the place, and doesn't have 100% loyalty, because this isn't his (her) primary employer. Don't get me wrong, they do the best they can, but its not the same skill level as a guy whose done 40 hours a week for a couple of years.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
                            ...in my view, you're getting an officer who isn't here enough of the time to get to know the place, and doesn't have 100% loyalty, because this isn't his (her) primary employer. Don't get me wrong, they do the best they can, but its not the same skill level as a guy whose done 40 hours a week for a couple of years.
                            It's too bad we've never figured out a way to put a firm dollar value on the "institutional knowledge" that walks out the door when experienced people leave. We do know that it's a substantial loss, but it's a "soft asset" that's been resistant to every effort that's been made to actually quantify it. Unfortunately, provable dollar-based numbers that you can plug into a spreadsheet are the only things that the corporate bean-counters and business executives - i.e., the ones who set wages - pay any attention to, so they think it's the same thing whether a 5-year or a 5-month employee leaves. We know differently, of course, but we just can't put it into dollars and cents that forces executives to see the value they should be paying for.

                            It takes EXPERIENCE ("institutional knowledge") for an officer to know that something in the environment has changed, and to find out why. An officer who notices that Mr. Farquar has suddenly started staying after everyone leaves, when he's always been the first one out the door - and becomes curious about what Mr. Farquar's doing - just might be the most valuable asset you have at some particular moment in time. Maybe he's been given extra work - or maybe he's copying the company's customer lists to sell to a competitor. In any case, it merits some scrutiny, or perhaps just an extra notation in the duty log to the attention of the site manager for him to look into. He can find out if Mr. Farquar has a legitimate reason to be staying after hours, and bring it to the attention of his supervisor. It's a legitimate matter of concern - but not to anyone who doesn't spot that behavioral change in the first place.

                            You simply can't get that level of surveillance from short-timers, no matter how diligent they might be, because they don't have the time in grade to be able to recognize the situation. When I was a rookie cop, it simply amazed me all the things that my FTO would see that meant nothing to me - a guy on this street corner, a car parked here or there. One time it was something that WASN'T where it should be - one of those sidewalk signs that the owner always put out when he opened up his shop. We drove around back where he parked and found him in his car, having a heart attack. How could I have possibly known that I wasn't seeing something that I should be seeing - unless, like my FTO, I was that familiar with the "normal" behavior of people in the environment? To me, the empty sidewalk was just a normal, ordinary sidewalk that had no meaning at all, but to my FTO the absence of that sign was something that triggered a bell in his head and made him curious enough to find out why it wasn't there when it should have been.

                            You gotta wear out some shoe leather, talk to a lot of people, spend time watching them and soaking up their behaviors, and put in the time to develop that kind of awareness. We ought not to throw experienced people away as carelessly as we often do in this industry - especially as we are going to need that higher level of surveillance in the years to come, I'm thinking, and you can't get it from rookies.
                            Last edited by SecTrainer; 09-17-2014, 04:15 PM.
                            "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                            "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                            "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                            "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              What I notice about how most warm body companies are managed is that it is all about managing the current crisis with out looking to the future in regards to problems. It is the burning out of good guards to cover for those who will sleep, get intoxicated or generally not do rounds on site. It is the forcing thru threat of being fired to show up sick only to infect the whole entire site with what ever bug they have gotten. The long hours of being up for 36-72 hours combined with the long distances of driving that could be potentially dangerous to everyone on the road. This dollar amount for "institutional knowledge" has no value for these companies who sell faux security to clients looking for the cheapest rates to secure their site. We are pawns to be moved around at will until we either quit or are fired then a new batch of people will come in to fill the ranks. This is why the industry resistance to training,properly equipping and paying the guards they hire because they are just passing thru until they can get a better job outside the industry. Hence the race to the bottom comments I have been posting in other parts of the forum. Employee candidates used to be a zero sum game but with loosing restrictions and hiring illegals to secure sites like in California, a whole new pool of potential employees have opened up to them. This pool of cheap labor is worth more to them then "institutional knowledge" ever could be. Security for most is just a job to get off being unemployed and for the most part is not a career.
                              Confronted with the choice, the American people would choose the policeman's truncheon over the anarchist's bomb.
                              Spiro Agnew

                              Why yes I am a glorified babysitter , I am here to politely ask you to follow the rules , if not daddy comes to spank you and put you in time out its your choice - Me

                              Luck is a red hair woman , if you ever dated one you know there remarkably dangerous , my personal preference is to be competent and let luck join the ride if she so chooses .- Clint Smith

                              Comment

                              300x250

                              Collapse

                              Mid 300x250

                              Collapse

                              Taboola

                              Collapse

                              Super Leaderboard

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X