Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

LP Education

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • LP Education

    Hello everyone!

    I'm new to Loss Prevention and was wondering if anyone can recommend any books or websites that give useful information or "tips and tricks" for Loss Prevention work. I have a BS in Criminal Justice but hardly any time was spent on LP information, theories, or techniques. Store training can only go so far in my opinion, and just a few tips from an seasoned agent can go a long way in my experience.

    So... any ideas?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Curlyarm
    Hello everyone!

    I'm new to Loss Prevention and was wondering if anyone can recommend any books or websites that give useful information or "tips and tricks" for Loss Prevention work. I have a BS in Criminal Justice but hardly any time was spent on LP information, theories, or techniques. Store training can only go so far in my opinion, and just a few tips from an seasoned agent can go a long way in my experience.

    So... any ideas?
    Here's an overview article on the Web that you might find interesting. It's a little long, so you'll probably want to print it out for reading. It's not dated and appears to have been written before the federal polygraph law was passed. Polygraphs can still be used in the investigation of demonstrated loss such as theft, sabotage, etc., but NOT for "suspected theft" or for employment screening in the retail industry as the author states.

    Loss Prevention Magazine is an obvious resource, and they've also started a certification program in loss prevention you can check out at this link. This is a brand new program and I have no information about its quality.

    On a more theoretical level, Bill Copeland wrote a book entited "Absolutely Zero Loss" that seems to be out of print now but I see that used copies are available through Amazon for as low as 50 cents.

    In "Absolutely Zero Loss", Copeland argues that it is possible to build an organizational culture that tolerates no losses and that this lofty goal (or something close to it) can actually be achieved if we raise our expectations instead of believing that loss is inevitable. A book like this would be very good reading if you plan to make a career in LP and want to move up to positions where you can really influence organizational attitudes about losses.

    NAIS (or PI Mall), where the above article comes from might also have some books, videos, etc. on retail investigations, LP, and similar topics (here's one, in fact). I'm not a particular fan of this organization because many of the publications they sell can be found cheaper elsewhere, but they also have some books that you can't get anywhere else.

    Charles Sennewald has a book out entitled "Shoplifters Vs Retailers: The Rights of Both", available through Amazon for $10. Sennewald also wrote another book about private security investigations which is more general but does cover retail and internal theft methods.

    ...and Burt Rapp wrote a dandy little book entitled "Shoplifting and Employee Theft Investigation", published by Loompanics who are out of business now. ((Loompanics was sort of "fringe", like Paladin Press, publishing stuff like "How To Hide Your Assets from the IRS" and things like that, but this book was better caliber.) I think you could find a used copy if you try.

    Last, but not least, I'm sure that if you Google this search phrase:

    "loss prevention" techniques OR strategies OR methods OR principles

    entered exactly as it's shown above (including the quotes and capital letters), you'll have plenty of reading to keep you busy, and lots of resources to follow. Try the same search with "retail theft" instead of "loss prevention", too.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-10-2007, 10:31 AM.
    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

    Comment


    • #3
      LP Websites

      For retail security/loss prevention related websites try:

      http://www.mylpspaceonline.com/

      http://www.lpinformation.com/

      http://www.rlpx.com/

      Also my website http://www.securityconsultingstrateg...s_Authors.html has an authors page which willl tell you about Sennewald's books.
      Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
      Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

      Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

      Comment


      • #4
        ....and one thing about LP Magazine you should know is that while I call it a resource, it also in my opinion has an agenda, but you can make that call.

        As an alternative to LP Magazine, find out what the trade magazines are for the type of venue where you're working (say, retail clothing, convenience stores, etc.) because they will often carry articles about LP that are specifically targeted to that specific sector of retail. Any half-decent research librarian will know how to find the publications' titles for your retail sector (or ask the manager of your store what he reads), and can also tell you how you can access at least some of them through the library system.

        If you are indeed this ambitious, here's some research hints:

        1. Don't overlook the "Letters to the Editor" section. Cutting-edge issues are often discussed here.

        2. Pay attention to the author info. People who write LP articles for one magazine often write for others and you can search on their names to extend your research. People who write articles also sometimes write books!

        3. When reading an article, look for keywords that you also might search on as another kind of research extension. "RFID" would be an example.

        4. Don't be bashful about making the research librarian your partner. She's being paid a salary to help you. However, put specific questions to her, not general questions. In other words, if what you want to know is how many shoplifting cases were successfully prosecuted in Schenectady, NY in 2003, make that your first question. Don't just assume that something that specific might not be available, and often you'll be amazed at what she'll find. Only if she can't find that specific answer, would you then generalize your question a bit - say, looking for shoplifting cases successfully prosecuted in the US by year and by region.

        5. If author information specifically includes an email address and the invitation to make comments to the author, you can also interpret that to include questions. Start conversations with these experts...they're usually only too glad to help. A good way to begin an email is: "I found your article in Shoplifter's Magazine very helpful. One question that I wonder if you might shed some light on is <whatever>" and, of course, thank them for their insights.

        6. Other "old LP salts", when you can find them, can be good resources...but they can be bad ones, too. A healthy dose of skepticism is a good idea here, but pick their brains when you can. Look for these people by doing specific blog searches on loss prevention keywords, and also searching for loss prevention groups on Yahoo!, etc.

        Best wishes!
        Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-10-2007, 10:51 AM.
        "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

        "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

        "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

        "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

        Comment


        • #5
          Wow thanks a lot guys!! great information!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by SecTrainer

            In "Absolutely Zero Loss", Copeland argues that it is possible to build an organizational culture that tolerates no losses and that this lofty goal (or something close to it) can actually be achieved if we raise our expectations instead of believing that loss is inevitable.
            This reminds me of when Kmart used to call their LP Loss Control. Hey, if you can't prevent it, might as well try to control it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Investigation
              This reminds me of when Kmart used to call their LP Loss Control. Hey, if you can't prevent it, might as well try to control it.
              When you can't meet expectations, you have two choices: Try harder, or see if you can lower the expectations. "Loss Control" certainly lowers the expectations compared to those conveyed by "Loss Prevention".

              If you lived behind a dam and asked the engineers "Will this prevent my house from flooding?" and they said "No, but it will control the flooding" - well, you'd probably move. Controlled flooding wasn't what you were hoping for.
              Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-13-2007, 01:02 AM.
              "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

              "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

              "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

              "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

              Comment

              Leaderboard

              Collapse
              Working...
              X