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Internal Theft/Fraud Research Question

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  • #16
    Originally posted by LPCap
    Catching the ones that are vocal about their dislike for their boss, job, company are the easy ones to catch. The ones who are quietly sulking and pissed off at whatever in life are the hard ones.

    Theives are manipulators too, they can con many LP and Managers into believing that they are the company man, while they bilk thousands from right under their noses.

    I would say that each segment of retail, whether it be department store, big box, discounter, fast food, restaraunt or grocer has their own unique theft "hot spots". I would say that more night shift and front end, cash office associates steal more in the grocery enviroment, while it would be spread evenly through a department store.
    LPCap, the disgruntled IT employee is the one who can really do your business great harm. To destroy and mangle IT is the greatest theft from an employer and others such malevolence can wrought.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Bill Warnock
      LPCap, the disgruntled IT employee is the one who can really do your business great harm. To destroy and mangle IT is the greatest theft from an employer and others such malevolence can wrought.
      Enjoy the day,
      Bill
      Absolutely - which is why the best policy when terminating these people is to conduct the exit interview without prior notice, during which their system accounts are being disabled, and then you take their keys/cards and escort them immediately from the interview out of the building.

      You will then need to exercise extremely close monitoring of your systems for a period of time in the event that they have created "back doors" or left "time bombs". One such "bomb" that an IT employee left behind was one that checked the payroll detail list each payday and, if it did not find that employee on the list (which meant he had been fired, of course), it was programmed to begin deleting highly valuable information from the system. Another bomb had a somewhat similar "trigger" but was programmed to email highly confidential engineering files to company competitors (who were not complicit in this scheme).
      Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-03-2007, 02:21 AM.
      "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

      "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

      "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

      "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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      • #18
        Its always been a game to me with the disgruntled IT worker. You know that they can do interesting (but highly damaging) things to the servers, and you get to determine what they are and stop them. There is always a physical security aspect to terminating an IT worker, especially since he could have buddies or those he's blackmailing to physically start the "meltdown" process. There's also the network aspect, isolating the servers from the network and monitoring what traffic is going in and out (looking for that accomplice at the time), and later on (looking for that login from home, which will come)...
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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        • #19
          Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
          Its always been a game to me with the disgruntled IT worker. You know that they can do interesting (but highly damaging) things to the servers, and you get to determine what they are and stop them. There is always a physical security aspect to terminating an IT worker, especially since he could have buddies or those he's blackmailing to physically start the "meltdown" process. There's also the network aspect, isolating the servers from the network and monitoring what traffic is going in and out (looking for that accomplice at the time), and later on (looking for that login from home, which will come)...
          Nathan, SecTrainer in my years as an security specialist/inspector, 1971 onward, I have preached as an article of faith the ability of programers or others to insert subroutines into their work for no apparent or logical reason that at a date certain will come together, create an unauthorized routine and wipe out or modify certain critical files or safeguards and then disappear as instructed. The answers I get from managers, then as now, gives me pause. So-an-so is creative and I don't want to dampen a creative spirit. Sure there is unnecessary things in the code he writes but that is his flair. What rubbish! That will be the free spirit who will do you in. Individualism has its place but at what price?
          Excellent comments gentlemen.
          What say the rest of you?
          Enjoy the day,
          Bill

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          • #20
            Oh, individualism is fine. So is code checking.

            Usually when I see something like that, its long after the fact and its not the person writing programs, its the IT manager in the mom-and-pop who's a friend of a friend. When its time to let him go because his friend's sister is no longer a friend and he's disliking the company... Backdoors suddenly appear.
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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