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  • Hotel Security/LP in Southern CA?

    I am presently about to move to the San Diego area, and forced to live the job I love at my local police department. Because of how quickly I really need to get down there, I don't have time to presently apply to the local PD's and wait 3-5 months to pass all the necessary hiring steps. I was thinking about finding a luxury hotel (in hopes they pay the best?) and try to get on with them for a few months while I find a new PD or possibly the probation department or something to get hired on to. I don't think finding work would be a problem due to my 2+ years of non-sworn law enforcement experience working in fingerprinting, evidence, and the jail, plus college, and CA POST narcotics training courses, CPR, etc. My question is for you guys though, the security experts, as I don't really have any experience with the private sector.

    How much money am I looking to be making? Obviously I'm not interested in taking a huge pay cut here coming from the city government side of things? I would hope something around $14 an hour at least wouldn't be too much to ask? I've heard horror stories of LP guys making like $9 an hour or something, I hope that isn't true? Anyway, I greatly appreciate any information you can give me about how hotel security is, and how it pays, etc. Thanks again guys, the sooner I can find something, the sooner I can get down there and eventually back into the swing of things!

  • #2
    Having worked LP in San Diego I can't speak to the hotel side of the industry, but can to the LP side. Your background, as you list it, would not be a benefit to you in LP. You would be looking at enrty level positions in. Sorry if that hurts, but that's reality. The starting pay is about $9.00-$10.00/hr.

    Don't forget you will need to go through LE certification school again. California accepts few, if any, other certification programs. I looked into it...years ago. This may of changed since my inquirys. I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong.

    Good luck. I hope you find what you're looking for.
    Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
    Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

    Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

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    • #3
      Wow that's a shock to me. It just seems weird to me that law enforcement training wouldn't hold up well when applying for private sector positions. I'm by no means arguing what you say, just sort of shocked, you know ? Probably in my interest to bite the bullet and sit back and wait for those 3-5 month long hiring processes it sounds like. Quick question though, when you said LE certification school, what did you mean by that? The only certification accepted in CA is POST, which is the state law enforcement command. I may have just interpreted what you were saying wrong though. . .

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      • #4
        I think he misunderstood and thought you were moving to SD from out of state.

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        • #5
          Ohhh I see, thanks for clearing that up for me. Yeah I'm just moving down from the Santa Barbara county area, about 300 miles north of SD. . .

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Beach Bum
            Wow that's a shock to me. It just seems weird to me that law enforcement training wouldn't hold up well when applying for private sector positions.
            It really depends on what you're getting into. A law enforcement background would relate well to uniformed security positions or similiar types of security (including hotel security, I'm guessing).

            However, loss prevention (retail security) is really an entirely different type of work. Law enforcement training will certainly aid you in certain aspects, such as apprehensions, handcuffing, defensive tactics, etc. But the majority of the job is conducting surveillances, shopping, and trying not to have that "observant security/cop" look--you're doing a lot of acting.

            Your background will definately be a bonus when you're applying somewhere. But at least in LP, you'd still be going in entry level, because there's a ton of new stuff that you'd have to learn.

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            • #7
              In terms of pay, I would look into some other security positions that probably pay better than the typical LP or hotel security position. In my experience, those tend to be school districts, community colleges, universities, or armed uniformed positions at federal buildings, courthouses, etc.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by GCMC Security
                I think he misunderstood and thought you were moving to SD from out of state.
                You're correct. I thought he was coming from out of state. I didn't think the law had changed.
                Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

                Comment


                • #9
                  Beach Bum - You may want to look at the San Diego Padres organization.
                  Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                  Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                  Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Beach Bum
                    I am presently about to move to the San Diego area, and forced to live the job I love at my local police department. Because of how quickly I really need to get down there, I don't have time to presently apply to the local PD's and wait 3-5 months to pass all the necessary hiring steps. I was thinking about finding a luxury hotel (in hopes they pay the best?) and try to get on with them for a few months while I find a new PD or possibly the probation department or something to get hired on to. I don't think finding work would be a problem due to my 2+ years of non-sworn law enforcement experience working in fingerprinting, evidence, and the jail, plus college, and CA POST narcotics training courses, CPR, etc. My question is for you guys though, the security experts, as I don't really have any experience with the private sector.

                    How much money am I looking to be making? Obviously I'm not interested in taking a huge pay cut here coming from the city government side of things? I would hope something around $14 an hour at least wouldn't be too much to ask? I've heard horror stories of LP guys making like $9 an hour or something, I hope that isn't true? Anyway, I greatly appreciate any information you can give me about how hotel security is, and how it pays, etc. Thanks again guys, the sooner I can find something, the sooner I can get down there and eventually back into the swing of things!
                    If you are younger than 35-years old and have a college degree, give some consideration to becoming a Deputy US Marshal. If there is not an immediate opening, see if there is an opening for a WAE (when actually employed) as a stepping stone.
                    If you are older than 35-years old and have at least three years of sworn duty and a graduate of a recognized LE academy or a military service, give consideration to becoming a court security officer or CSO.
                    Either way, visit the US Marshal, in SD and find out.
                    Enjoy the day,
                    Bill

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                    • #11
                      Look into securitas, the last time I lived in SD county they were paying well.

                      11$ per hour to watch a parking lot in Oceanside.
                      Todd

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                      • #12
                        I don't know about where you are moving to but in Montreal there are only about 25 hotels that have full time security departments. *Even some of them don't have it 24 hours a day). many of the hotels only have 1 man on duty. This does not make for many jobs. (Probably a reason why there are very few hotel security people on this forum).
                        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                          If you are younger than 35-years old and have a college degree, give some consideration to becoming a Deputy US Marshal. If there is not an immediate opening, see if there is an opening for a WAE (when actually employed) as a stepping stone.
                          If you are older than 35-years old and have at least three years of sworn duty and a graduate of a recognized LE academy or a military service, give consideration to becoming a court security officer or CSO.
                          Either way, visit the US Marshal, in SD and find out.
                          Enjoy the day,
                          Bill
                          I have a son that spent some time in the Army as a 96B (counter intelligence). His goal was to come out of the Army and go to the US Marshalls office or the FBI. He chose instead to work for a private contractor (state side) doing exactly what he did in the Army and for 90K to start. Neither the US Marshall or the FBI are a option anymore.
                          Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                          Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                          Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            As far as uniformed security, if he applies to a "warm body" company, since he's fresh out a police department, they may not look at him as a viable candidate. After all, he's still trained as a police officer, and it takes a long time to ensure he doesn't create liability through action or confrontation.

                            Even then, it takes time to deprogram police officers who are used to acting with the full weight of law behind them.
                            Some Kind of Commando Leader

                            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                            • #15
                              Guys slow down. Re read his post. He worked for the PD in non-sworn position. Fingerprinting, evidence and as a jail bunny.

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