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  • Wearable Cameras

    Just wondering whether anyone in LP is using wearable cameras to collect evidence, or sees any future in doing so. I attended a demonstration recently about the use of bodycams in LE and I have to admit I was mighty impressed with the quality of the video despite the camera size, movement etc. The camera was fairly wide-angle so the officer didn't have to be too concerned about "aiming" it, yet the resolution was very decent - certainly "evidence" quality. This was a wireless, linked back to the squad car, but the recorder could certainly be in the LP office just as easily.

    The reason I ask is that direct video evidence of a crime is marvelous for convincing perps to confess, and will often induce defense attorneys to plead out the case instead of fighting it. So, I can see the LP guy showing a shoplifter the video right there in the office and taking most of the resistance they might have to signing the forms, right from the git-go. The video would be a good wake-up call to parents when they come and pick up their precious "my-child-would-never-do-that-how-dare-you-arrest-them" darlings, too!!

    "Now right there, ma'am, you see your darling daughter stuffing five items of makeup into her purse. And right there, ma'am, you see her tearing the tag off that pair of jeans. And here she's walking out in those jeans plus a pair of Nike's that she wasn't wearing when she came into the store. In fact, she's practically had a complete change of clothes while in the store. ANY QUESTIONS, MA'AM? No? I thought perhaps not."
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 03-12-2007, 07:46 PM.
    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

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  • #2
    Originally posted by SecTrainer
    Just wondering whether anyone in LP is using wearable cameras to collect evidence, or sees any future in doing so. I attended a demonstration recently about the use of bodycams in LE and I have to admit I was mighty impressed with the quality of the video despite the camera size, movement etc. The camera was fairly wide-angle so the officer didn't have to be too concerned about "aiming" it, yet the resolution was very decent - certainly "evidence" quality. This was a wireless, linked back to the squad car, but the recorder could certainly be in the LP office just as easily.

    The reason I ask is that direct video evidence of a crime is marvelous for convincing perps to confess, and will often induce defense attorneys to plead out the case instead of fighting it. So, I can see the LP guy showing a shoplifter the video right there in the office and taking most of the resistance they might have to signing the forms, right from the git-go. The video would be a good wake-up call to parents when they come and pick up their precious "my-child-would-never-do-that-how-dare-you-arrest-them" darlings, too!!

    "Now right there, ma'am, you see your darling daughter stuffing five items of makeup into her purse. And right there, ma'am, you see her tearing the tag off that pair of jeans. And here she's walking out in those jeans plus a pair of Nike's that she wasn't wearing when she came into the store. In fact, she's practically had a complete change of clothes while in the store. ANY QUESTIONS, MA'AM? No? I thought perhaps not."
    That my friend is really slick! They had a segment on Court TV using those cameras, video as well as audio.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by SecTrainer
      Just wondering whether anyone in LP is using wearable cameras to collect evidence, or sees any future in doing so. I attended a demonstration recently about the use of bodycams in LE and I have to admit I was mighty impressed with the quality of the video despite the camera size, movement etc. The camera was fairly wide-angle so the officer didn't have to be too concerned about "aiming" it, yet the resolution was very decent - certainly "evidence" quality. This was a wireless, linked back to the squad car, but the recorder could certainly be in the LP office just as easily.

      The reason I ask is that direct video evidence of a crime is marvelous for convincing perps to confess, and will often induce defense attorneys to plead out the case instead of fighting it. So, I can see the LP guy showing a shoplifter the video right there in the office and taking most of the resistance they might have to signing the forms, right from the git-go. The video would be a good wake-up call to parents when they come and pick up their precious "my-child-would-never-do-that-how-dare-you-arrest-them" darlings, too!!

      "Now right there, ma'am, you see your darling daughter stuffing five items of makeup into her purse. And right there, ma'am, you see her tearing the tag off that pair of jeans. And here she's walking out in those jeans plus a pair of Nike's that she wasn't wearing when she came into the store. In fact, she's practically had a complete change of clothes while in the store. ANY QUESTIONS, MA'AM? No? I thought perhaps not."
      I have never shown video to a shoplifter except in court. Often just showing up with the video in hand elicits a guilty plea. I have showen video to a few dishonest employees during the interview stage. A couple have claimed it was not them stealing. Even when there is clear evidence of them doing so.
      Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
      Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

      Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Security Consultant
        I have never shown video to a shoplifter except in court. Often just showing up with the video in hand elicits a guilty plea. I have showen video to a few dishonest employees during the interview stage. A couple have claimed it was not them stealing. Even when there is clear evidence of them doing so.


        Same here not once have I shown a video to a shoplifter. the only videos I have ever shown (within store walls) is for crooked employees! that will normally stop the denying! On subject of wearable cameras I doubt many retailers will want to spend the cash on them. Loss Prevention departments are very under funded!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Security Consultant
          I have never shown video to a shoplifter except in court. Often just showing up with the video in hand elicits a guilty plea. I have showen video to a few dishonest employees during the interview stage. A couple have claimed it was not them stealing. Even when there is clear evidence of them doing so.
          Good points made by SecTrainer, but I too would never show video to a shoplifter. You don't need a shoplifter to agree with you that they are guilty--you (may) have video, you have your own witnessed statement, and you have the merchandise that you recovered.

          You have nothing to prove to the shoplifter, only to the responding police officer (to develop probable cause) and to the court (to convict). I've had shoplifters sit there and continue to argue that they are innocent. I would tell them to just tell it to the judge.

          By showing them video in the security office, you're only giving them more ammunition to argue with, plus you're showing them where your cameras are located and the angles of viewing that they have.

          Comment


          • #6
            I guess there are options for the cameras, but how long is battery life?
            Is there a time stamp that your lawyer would want to be accurate?
            Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
            Groucho Marx

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SecTrainer
              Just wondering whether anyone in LP is using wearable cameras to collect evidence, or sees any future in doing so. I attended a demonstration recently about the use of bodycams in LE and I have to admit I was mighty impressed with the quality of the video despite the camera size, movement etc. The camera was fairly wide-angle so the officer didn't have to be too concerned about "aiming" it, yet the resolution was very decent - certainly "evidence" quality. This was a wireless, linked back to the squad car, but the recorder could certainly be in the LP office just as easily.

              The reason I ask is that direct video evidence of a crime is marvelous for convincing perps to confess, and will often induce defense attorneys to plead out the case instead of fighting it. So, I can see the LP guy showing a shoplifter the video right there in the office and taking most of the resistance they might have to signing the forms, right from the git-go. The video would be a good wake-up call to parents when they come and pick up their precious "my-child-would-never-do-that-how-dare-you-arrest-them" darlings, too!!

              "Now right there, ma'am, you see your darling daughter stuffing five items of makeup into her purse. And right there, ma'am, you see her tearing the tag off that pair of jeans. And here she's walking out in those jeans plus a pair of Nike's that she wasn't wearing when she came into the store. In fact, she's practically had a complete change of clothes while in the store. ANY QUESTIONS, MA'AM? No? I thought perhaps not."
              Don't most places have cameras already? Not everywhere of course, but the majority probably does. How would the wearable cameras change anything from an evidence point of view?
              www.plsolutions.net
              www.customerloyaltysolutions.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Lynch Mob
                Don't most places have cameras already? Not everywhere of course, but the majority probably does. How would the wearable cameras change anything from an evidence point of view?
                Perhaps they'd be used to get in some of those blind spots that cameras might miss, or in single officer stores where the officer is working the floor and not CCTV.

                Comment


                • #9
                  LP's best friend

                  Miniture cameras have improved in quality by leaps and bounds and it is not too difficult to add audio.

                  Portable recorders are as small as ever and can offer anywhere up to 8 hours recording time with extended capacity batteries. The recorder can offer syncronized audio & video with option to add file date & time stamp.

                  Cameras can be incorporated in to clothing for covert operations or overtly wearable, such as on a head band

                  " Police in the UK have used a head worn camera & recorder as described above to record arrests and are used in court to backup allegations of resisting arrest, fleeing or violent disorder. In most cases when the video is shown in court the defendant pleads guilty"

                  B Kalia
                  Systems Integrator
                  Securicorp Ltd
                  www.securicorp.org

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If a person was "wearing" a camera he/she would have to get close enough to film subject. Now if that were case subject might get nervous having a person that close. I fail to see the real benefit of a camera on a LP's person would not add anything to the stop.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by LPGuy
                      Perhaps they'd be used to get in some of those blind spots that cameras might miss, or in single officer stores where the officer is working the floor and not CCTV.
                      A cell phone with video can do that. And you can poke it around a corner with less risk of being seen than a wearable camera.
                      www.plsolutions.net
                      www.customerloyaltysolutions.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Ok your putting cameras on a person. This person needs to get close enough to film. Now has a theft already taken place? If so the need for a camera on a person is zero you already have evidence. If no theft has taken place yet then you have someone "assuming" a theft is about to take place and filming said person. If thats so a simple verbal contact should suffice in stopping theft and not wasting anyones time.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Lynch Mob
                          A cell phone with video can do that. And you can poke it around a corner with less risk of being seen than a wearable camera.
                          I'm not advocating "wearable" cameras here, or even really arguing that they'd be very effective... but seriously, cell phone cameras? Low resolution 30-second clips will be real handy in court... not to mention the fact that the LP officer is holding his cell phone up and out in an obvious manner of recording instead of focusing on the floor surveillance at hand.

                          I think the point (which panther10758 missed) of such technology is not to get up close and film the subject, but rather, a hidden camera which just records everything from the officer's point of view--to back up your statement. It would do nothing more than that.

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                          • #14
                            The said camera would have same view as Officer! this means he would be required to get close enough for filming! Which takes me back to my orignal point. I missed nothing! Not to mention that any CCTV tape would also back up Officers statements
                            Last edited by panther10758; 03-13-2007, 09:36 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by panther10758
                              The said camera would have same view as Officer! this means he would be required to get close enough for filming!
                              If the camera has the same view as the officer, then the officer can go about his job doing floor surveillance normally. There would be no reason to get abnormally close to get good footage.

                              You're making it sound as if you'd need to stand right next to the shoplifter to go about filming them. Is that how you conduct your floor surveillances?
                              Last edited by LPGuy; 03-13-2007, 09:43 PM.

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