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  • Plain clothes Security

    Does anyone know th answer to this question. If provide security and your security officers are undercover, how do you confront a violator, without having to be in uniform, as per California statue.

    RPS

  • #2
    We were always told to verbally indentify ourselves and if challanged show our badge and ID card. I was rarely challanged

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    • #3
      Originally posted by RPS
      Does anyone know th answer to this question. If provide security and your security officers are undercover, how do you confront a violator, without having to be in uniform, as per California statue.

      RPS
      California law allows citizen's arrests for all crimes witnessed. You do not need a uniform.

      As for the practical aspect of doing it safely, well that is a much longer discussion. There are some articles on My LP Space (www.mylpspaceonline.com) that cover the subject of shoplift apprehensions.
      www.plsolutions.net
      www.customerloyaltysolutions.com

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Lynch Mob
        California law allows citizen's arrests for all crimes witnessed. You do not need a uniform.

        As for the practical aspect of doing it safely, well that is a much longer discussion. There are some articles on My LP Space (www.mylpspaceonline.com) that cover the subject of shoplift apprehensions.

        I work for a retailer and know that we don't have to wear uniforms and we don't. But as a private patrol operator, working for a retailer, does the private patrol operator's guards have to wear a uniform. Or because they are undercover only have to show a badge when they are asked?

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        • #5
          I would think you would have to show your guard card to an BSIS inspector or police officer. No one else needs to see your credentials.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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          • #6
            Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
            I would think you would have to show your guard card to an BSIS inspector or police officer. No one else needs to see your credentials.
            If anyone without credentials tried stopping me (not that they would ever have reason to) I am going to be extremely skeptical and cautious and probably won't listen if they can't produce proof of identity. Badges and ID tags are important to show authority and intimidate the lifter. Then again anyone can buy a badge online, so ultimately showing a badge isn't necessarily proof, but most people don't know that.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by OscarMike View Post
              If anyone without credentials tried stopping me (not that they would ever have reason to) I am going to be extremely skeptical and cautious and probably won't listen if they can't produce proof of identity. Badges and ID tags are important to show authority and intimidate the lifter. Then again anyone can buy a badge online, so ultimately showing a badge isn't necessarily proof, but most people don't know that.
              I could see showing a badge (unfortunately, in BC, security having badges is illegal), but I would never even consider showing my security license. I use verbal identification.

              Fact is, any private citizen can arrest for crimes witnessed, so it really doesn't matter who I am that I'm arresting them.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Lynch Mob View Post
                California law allows citizen's arrests for all crimes witnessed. You do not need a uniform.

                As for the practical aspect of doing it safely, well that is a much longer discussion. There are some articles on My LP Space (www.mylpspaceonline.com) that cover the subject of shoplift apprehensions.
                Hey it's good to see your still part of the forum aspect. I hope things are going well for you .

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                • #9
                  His post was from 3/2007
                  Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                  Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                  Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

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                  • #10
                    Oh I guess I should have looked at the date .

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Nauticus View Post
                      I could see showing a badge (unfortunately, in BC, security having badges is illegal), but I would never even consider showing my security license. I use verbal identification.

                      Fact is, any private citizen can arrest for crimes witnessed, so it really doesn't matter who I am that I'm arresting them.
                      In BC, as it also is here in Ontario, you must produce your security guard license upon request to anybody who asks for it when you're working in that capacity. If they don't ask, no worries, but if you're working and they demand to see your ID, you have a legal obligation to show it.

                      http://www.pssg.gov.bc.ca/securityin...r/licensed.htm

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